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    The “old newspaper” format is very cool and folksy and also as a partially blind person very very hard to read.

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      The repeated reflowing on load is also rather obnoxious.

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        Super annoying. Thanks for the report! https://github.com/treenotation/dumbdown/issues/8

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        also as a partially blind person very very hard to read.

        Short answer: any specific things you hate and are there reading apps you love?

        Longer answer: I designed for Scroll to be the most accessible publishing platform ever. Will pull this off by having everything be public domain and the clean Dumbdown/Tree Notation source for every article readily available.

        The design is to make it easy for readers to “take all the content with you” and consume it with their favorite reader. Think RSS but 100x better, since you actually get the full content in the simplest possible notation and can use whatever tool you want to render it just the way that works best for you.

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          Short answer: any specific things you hate and are there reading apps you love?

          Hate is way too strong a word. I have partial vision in one eye at 20/200 vision with a severe astigmatism so my eyeball jumps around a lot. Packing the text into a super dense layout like that makes it nearly impossible for me to actually attain focus on each line in the article, making the layout very hard for me to read.

          Glad to hear it’s an open platform with flexible rendering though, I’ll definitely take a more careful look, and thanks for sharing!

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            The design is to make it easy for readers to “take all the content with you” and consume it with their favorite reader.

            In that case it would be super cool if the static site itself had different viewing options for the same content that people could choose from.

            The newspaper layour is “cool” but I’d like to be able to switch to a more standard blogging layout with one article at a time, larger font, margins on desktop, table of contents, hyperlinks between related articles, perhaps search, etc. A simple cookie could track my preference for which “viewer” I prefer.

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              if the static site itself had different viewing options for the same content that people could choose from.

              I wouldn’t be opposed to this.

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            Totally agree! It would also be really cool, to only have the summary of each article shown. Sadly according to the readme the author is not interested in that…

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            Wait, so Dumbdown wasn’t a joke?

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              Please don’t get the wrong idea. Dumbdown was absolutely a joke.

              But then the joke kind of got turned around on me because it became like the most popular thing out of the Tree Notation stuff yet, even though I spent like an hour or two on it.

              So yes, now it’s real.

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              Not sure imitating a newspaper is good UX. Newspapers are the way they are due to physical end economic constraints, trying to fit as much content as possible onto low quality paper at the lowest cost. That means big sheets since cutting and binding are expensive, and a minimum of whitespace.. That in turn means lots of columns to avoid unreadably-long lines.

              Doing this on a screen is IMHO counterproductive skeumorphism. You have none of the constraints above; however you have to consider highly variable screen sizes, almost all of which are much smaller than a newspaper page. (I do most of my reading on an 11” iPad. My wife for some reason ends up reading news on her 6” phone.)

              In your layout the screen ends up being a window on a much taller layout, which means to continue to the next column you have to scroll all the way back up and then over; the same annoyance as reading multi-column PDFs. There’s no reason for that; if there are multiple columns they should be the same height as the screen, and scroll sideways.

              Presenting multiple articles this way results in a wall of text, which isn’t good navigation, especially when you can’t see much at once. Again, this is tied to constraints you no longer have on a computer; progressive disclosure would show summaries or headlines that would expand when clicked/tapped. At the very least, add some whitespace and larger/bolder text to make headlines more clear.

              I’m glad you’re experimenting! I just don’t think this is a productive direction to go in.

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                Design is based on “The New York Times Complete Front Pages: 1851-2018”. I’d highly recommend, love that book! It’s just as fun and easy to read the paper from 1851 as is it’s today’s paper.

                The public domain angle has a great way around the multiple size problem: I can focus on top 3 sizes (phone, tablet, and desktop) and then the long tail can build all sorts of readers for the rest!

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                Am I missing something or is there no way to ‘focus in’ on one particular article? I love the concept, but having all these other bright pixels dancing around in front of my eyes makes it quite hard to read a particular article comfortably.

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                  I agree. There’s a bug with reflow, but also just sort of hard to read on desktop.

                  On mobile you can double tap and article to zoom in/out.

                  Anyone know how to do something similar on desktop?

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                  Gotta admit, Dumbdown is kinda clean