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    The last few GNOME releases have been pretty nice (look-wise and performance-wise), I’ve specially liked the GNOME classic version. Sadly they’ve decided to remove the search feature for the sake of being more like GNOME 2. It really confused me, since I think that that was one of the things GNOME 3 really improved on.

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      There’s no mention of *BSD in that post. Shouldn’t this simply be tagged release?

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        Gnome is just getting better and better. I know it gets a lot of hate in the Linux world, but as a relative newbie coming from macOS it really helped me enjoy and settle into the Linux environment. I’ve tried Xfce, KDE and some of the others too but feel that Gnome is the one that will give the best first impressions to those coming from macOS and perhaps the highest chance of them sticking with Linux too.

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          Gotta say all the work being put into Gnome of late REALLY shows.

          This release FEELS snappy and is very solid, at least on X.

          Still prefer the ergonomics of Plasma, but I’m running Gnome on Ubuntu 20.04 since I think it represents the mainstream future of the UNIX desktop

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            Is there anything XFCE users like me would miss?

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              Perhaps Wayland and HiDPI display support?

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                Hype :)

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                I’m probably one of the unlucky ones. I switched my Ubuntu to Gnome from Unity and found a lot of pretty serious regressions in experience. Like:

                • There are intermittent freezes of the lock screen when it isn’t interactive for dozens of seconds. They seem to be network related, like when you open a laptop at a new location where there’s a few new WiFi networks available.
                • YouTube videos seem to play using non-accelerated rendering, I can see frame redrawing artifacts. I realize the problem could be anywhere in the stack, but it did work fine on Unity, with fractional scaling, without a hitch.
                • Desktop “folder” is now a hack, and sometimes resets the icon arrangement.
                • Without HUD some menu-heavy software with troubled UX history like GIMP has become unusable once again.
                • There is no way to disable screen lock using settings available by default. I don’t need my screen locked about 99% of the time I open my laptop. And there is a screen lock setting, it simply has no effect.
                • Various stock apps (like Calendar and Nautilus) seem to crash a lot more often. Looks like GNOME really doesn’t like long uptimes and wants you to reboot for things to stay manageable. (It’s just a feeling, not an analysis.)

                P.S. In case you wonder why wouldn’t I file bugs for all of those? This is because I had enough emotionally painful experiences filing bugs to big Open Source projects over the years. I don’t want to be treated like an annoyance when I willingly donate my time for them.

                P.P.S No, I don’t think GNOME developers owe me anything. I’m writing it not as a complaint, but as a precaution to those who would like to try GNOME, so they could adjust their expectations. I’ll be happy for everyone who doesn’t experience any of those bugs.

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                  Without HUD some menu-heavy software with troubled UX history like GIMP has become unusable once again.

                  pst

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                    YouTube videos seem to play using non-accelerated rendering, I can see frame redrawing artifacts. I realize the problem could be anywhere in the stack, but it did work fine on Unity, with fractional scaling, without a hitch.

                    It’s interesting that it worked well before, because all major browser vendors (Firefox, Chrome) disable video acceleration by default on Linux. Browsers need to be compiled with support and you have to pass an option to disable the blacklist (which blacklists all GPUs on Linux). The good news is that Firefox 75 is making strides when it comes to VA-API support:

                    https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1616185

                    P.S. In case you wonder why wouldn’t I file bugs for all of those? This is because I had enough emotionally painful experiences filing bugs to big Open Source projects over the years. I don’t want to be treated like an annoyance when I willingly donate my time for them.

                    FWIW: I have submitted some gnome-shell/mutter bug reports when the Wayland support was just new (it was very crashy) and I’ve found the mutter developers to be very appreciative and they fixed bugs very quickly. I do not have experience with submitting bugs for other GNOME projects though.

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                      all major browser vendors (Firefox, Chrome) disable video acceleration by default on Linux. Browsers need to be compiled with support and you have to pass an option to disable the blacklist (which blacklists all GPUs on Linux)

                      That kinda conflates video (VAAPI) with graphics (OpenGL). “frame redrawing artifacts” usually means something wrong with the graphics stack. Accelerated video decoding only improves power usage/performance, but should never be necessary to avoid artifacts.

                      You pretty much never had to recompile Firefox to enable GL compositing by the way, just go to about:config and tick layers.acceleration.force-enabled. Now also the MOZ_WEBRENDER=1 env variable should be sufficient to enable WebRender (more powerful than basic GL layers compositing).