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    It’s obvious to anyone running a business that GDPR is a massive pain in the ass, and a huge threat. 20M euros in fines will destroy any medium-sized company too.

    Oh but if a company is fined under GDPR, surely that means it deserved to die, right? Good riddance! .. To any valuable products or services it provided, and good riddance to all the jobs it had created too!

    The GDPR has been successfully sold to the masses, as something that will supposedly prevent sleazy ad companies from invading your privacy. But do you really think Google will be invading it any less than before?

    What about governments then? Do you think intelligence agencies will spy on you less?

    This is the main reason why GDPR is such a fucking farce. They tell you they’re protecting your privacy, while invading it as much as they possibly can.

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      Agree it’s a huge hassle.

      On the other hand people really suffered from not being able to get new bridges when engineering requirements were brought in, but 50 years later we no longer had lethal collapses on a regular basis.

      Being able to make google wipe out everything they know about me is pretty cool. I’ve nearly finished getting their hooks out of my stuff.

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          If I could get a friend to blow the whistle on anything they’re still holding, I’d be happy to split the 4%.

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            Count me in ;)

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        What about governments then? Do you think intelligence agencies will spy on you less?

        Nope, since GDPR is primarily about working with commercial entities rather than clandestine government agencies.

        But do you really think Google will be invading it any less than before?

        I expect them to comply with the law.

        I also expect companies will pop up with low-cost solutions to deal with user data, similarly to how PCI regulation created an industry for payment providers to come up and handle that aspect of the transaction. Cloud providers can offer userdata bases that are encrypted and architecture for it. And designing a new system for GDPR is not super challenging, the important parts of the law tend to be pretty straight forward.

        As someone who was involved in implementing GDPR at a company, I believe the law is a good first iteration. I’m sure we’ll find that some things in it are irrelevant and some things in it are harmful, but I believe in pushing for privacy.

        Do you have an alternative? You’ve consistently commented on GDPR being a bad idea and implied, but not out right said, that it will have no effect. Is your suggestion that we should just drop the idea and let companies do what they want? Do you have a suggestion for alternative legislation?

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          I also expect companies will pop up with low-cost solutions to deal with user data

          Don’t want to deal with the VAT-MESS? -Oh no problem! You just pay someone else to take care of that bullshit.

          Don’t want to deal with the GDPR? -Oh no biggie. There’s a service to deal with that bullshit.

          But a burden is still a burden, even if you pay someone else to deal with it, and there’s a limit to the burdens a business can bear.

          I suspect the real goal of all these new burdensome regulations is to gradually cull small (and even medium) sized businesses, as part of a drive to centralize our societies ever further, so that we’re all easier to rule over.

          I believe the law is a good first iteration. I’m sure we’ll find that some things in it are irrelevant and some things in it are harmful, but I believe in pushing for privacy.

          It’s far from a good first iteration. They’re threatening one-man companies with 20M EUR fines for not complying with rules that are basically impossible to fully comply with. That’s not something to cheer for, and that doesn’t happen by accident - genuinely retarded people don’t get to a position where they’re writing EU-wide laws.

          People keep telling us we’ll just have to wait and see how the law will be interpreted. That sounds vaguely benign, but what that means in the real world is observing which companies get destroyed for which arbitrary/political reasons.

          It’s a bit like waiting to see who gets executed for wearing the kind of clothes the Emperor doesn’t happen to like. Is there no problem once everyone knows what kind of clothes he’s unhappy with?

          Do you have an alternative? You’ve consistently commented on GDPR being a bad idea and implied, but not out right said, that it will have no effect.

          How about “no onerous bullshit legislation”? Of course it will have effects, and they’ll be a massive net negative. How about tens of thousands of companies not wasting time researching and complying with onerous bullshit legislation, and concentrating on providing valuable goods and services instead?

          Even if GDPR actually makes some privacy-invading scumbags call it a day, it’s not even meant to do anything about the police states budding everywhere.

          Pretty much everyone on this forum is intimately familiar how the people running governments operate.. so why are you seemingly fine with.. well, anything governments do?

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            Even if GDPR actually makes some privacy-invading scumbags call it a day, it’s not even meant to do anything about the police states budding everywhere.

            You keep on bringing up government surveillance but GDPR does not have anything to do with that. It’s a fine fight to have but it’s not related to this particular discussion, there are other laws and legislation around government agencies.

            How about “no onerous bullshit legislation”?

            This is an entirely unactionable suggestion. One person’s onerous bullshit legislation is another’s opportunity. There is not meaningful way to turn this useless platitude into a working economic system.

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              You keep on bringing up government surveillance but GDPR does not have anything to do with that.

              Privacy, hello?

              This is an entirely unactionable suggestion.

              You’re saying onerous bullshit legislation has to be created, but that’s not true.

              One person’s onerous bullshit legislation is another’s opportunity.

              Duh? Of course it benefits whoever charges you money for dealing with the bullshit. So what?

              There is not meaningful way to turn this useless platitude into a working economic system.

              That sounds like you’re over-exerting yourself in trying to sound smart.

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          This is exactly the point I am trying to make. How can a business take advantage of GDPR and build a “legal” tracking system that you can turn into a recommender system for example.

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            Well you’re basically just advertising your http://grakn.ai/ service, and trying to polish the GDPR turd in the process.

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              I am not actually working for GRAKN which is not a service but a database. I build a proof of concept for the company I work for. I had considered neo4j for the task but found GRAKN better suited. GRAKN did appreciate my proof of concept and asked me to publish my paper.

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          This is a series of blogs. It will be followed by an implementation example with an hypergraph database: GRAKN.AI