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    It’s good to see another article like this. I remember reading his other post. I’ve been hosting my own e-mail for years; currently running on an opensmtpd/openbsd stack, and I’ve run into a lot of the same issues.

    coming from the same country (currently led by a lunatic who abuses power and probably suffers from NPD)

    I really dislike these little quips at political commentary. I’m no fan of the Orange Man either, but stuff like this ignores what he’s trying to say in the article – the big players: big tech, big defence, big pharma and big oil are the ones who call a lot of the shots.. The Big E-mail the author talks about is the core issue, not the orange puppet, and talking about his mental state without examining him personally is problamatic.

    I like how the author dives into sanctions though. Not only Github, but Adobe and other major platforms have cut off people from essential tools due to a mix of sanctions and shitty subscription models. This stuff alone should encourage people to setup their own infrastructure using open source projects (e.g. run Gogs, Gitlab, etc.). In the case of Adobe … well since you can’t actually buy their software anymore, either buy a used CS6 license or .. I think we’re just going to see more piracy really.

    I don’t think that either one of the Big Mailer Corps are evil or bad, I use some of their services on a daily basis

    I get what he’s trying to say: if you’re in tech, do the work to help build out a diverse Internet ecosystem .. but most people are going to use the big stuff cause it’s easy and cheap or free. I dunno how I feel about this. I don’t like the big players and I’m not sure I agree with the author that most of them are operating for the greater good. .. They might have good people working there, but companies end up having emergent goal-setting that is more than the sum of its parts; and that is focused on infinite growth and domination in a way the individuals may not be.

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      Sanctions apply to everyone, not just big corporations. It’s just as illegal for J. Random Hacker to make their tarballs available to users from Iran from a server hosted in their basement as it is for Github. Distributed infrastructure may make it more difficult to enforce, but then a sufficiently lunatic government can build a Great Firewall of $country to make distributed infrastructure impossible.

      There are many reasons to build a diverse, distributed Internet infrastructure, but it’s not a way to keep governments from enacting more control over the people.

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        Sanctions apply to everyone, not just big corporations. It’s just as illegal for J. Random Hacker to make their tarballs available to users from Iran from a server hosted in their basement as it is for Github.

        This is true, and is a valid point.

        Distributed infrastructure may make it more difficult to enforce, but then a sufficiently lunatic government can build a Great Firewall of $country to make distributed infrastructure impossible. There are many reasons to build a diverse, distributed Internet infrastructure, but it’s not a way to keep governments from enacting more control over the people.

        This, I disagree with partially. Making a bad law more difficult to enforce changes the incentives of the government trying to enforce it in favorable ways. It forces governments to either spend more political capital and money on enforcement, or decide that it’s not worth it to enforce and give up. This was the case with alcohol prohibition in the United States and also marijuana prohibition in many jurisdictions. A diverse distributed Internet infrastructure might not prevent governments from enacting laws that are designed to give them more control over the people, but it will make it easier for people to break those laws, and that matters.

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        I really dislike these little quips at political commentary. […] [Companies] are the ones who call a lot of the shots.

        It’s a very timely comment. Russia blocked StartMail and ProtonMail this week. Mailbox.org is next. Tutanota provide the same type of services as the three others so they may be a liekly target after that.

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        I recently undeployed my personal mail service @chrisdone.com because despite my Just So auto renewing Let’s Encrypt config, my TLS cert expired. I did not feel like dropping everything to debug something I already committed time to, so I crumbled and created a protonmail account. That failed with an error message but they still took payment. So I contacted my bank and told them to reverse the payment, which they did. I sent a displeased support message to protonmail and they sent me a new registration link, clearly missing the point. Then I registered a fastmail account and configured my domain’s MX records and everything worked flawlessly and has done since.

        My takeaway is that at the very least, having my main mail account be at a domain I control (@chrisdone.com), means that at any point I can change the service to a different software package that someone else has taken the care to make self sufficient. I was enjoying writing my own mail server in Haskell, but then after a year of using it, it took me a couple weeks to notice my certificate expired: I don’t use mail as much as I thought I did. Hardly worth maintaining it unless I were making a mail server startup, which doesn’t appeal to me.

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          I can’t put my finger on it but I don’t like this article. Also I find it a bit weird to first write an article on how hard it is, then one using OpenBSD (that will surely go over well for people who have never administered a webserver OR used the OS) and then this one.

          Not that I’m disagreeing with the basic premise and outcome of the article (I.. guess?) but that doesn’t mean I have to agree with this article.

          Disclaimer: Have self-hosted mail server for 15+ years, have done that at work, have also run OpenSMTPd on OpenBSD for a while and found it lacking/too complicated to replicate the features I wanted, which I’d describe as “not too fancy”, but that was a few years ago, I’m generally a fan of Postfix.

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            I interpreted the article about mail hosting being hard to be attempting to inform people that running your own mail server isn’t as incredibly difficult as is commonly said to be.

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              I’m not sure that everyone read the whole thing instead of the headline and opening paragraph. :P

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                I skimmed that one, and don’t understand why the blog post title contradicted the text. I wonder if it was intended to be sarcastic or mocking, somehow.