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    Look like a huge waste of time and money except for a few super fans

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      I think most people mainframe curious are either…

      1. Run the last public domain versions (or enhanced versions of) the OSes to get a feeling for them (or run newer versions in, but that’s sketch)

      2. Are better off running something like i instead, which gives you the IBM mainframe aesthetics in a far easier to use and more manageable tower/4U server. (edit: Or Unisys’ hobbyist program, which is very reasonable. But it’s not IBM…)

      z/PDT is awfully expensive to run current generation mainframe stuff; it’s priced like it’s you’re actually using it for your job. (edit: And nowadays at least for z, IBM does provide i.e cloud instances for people to fuck around and find out about z/OS on…)

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        i

        i.e

        IBM really needs to work on naming.

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        What workloads are mainframes still better at these days?

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          What’s the point of this? Most of the unique features of zOS are only really useful or interesting if you’re running it on a mainframe, which this person isn’t doing. 90% of the blogpost is the person trying to get a copy of it in the first place, and talking about code licensing bullshit.

          I don’t see why anyone would go through this trouble except out of curiosity, but as far as I can tell for ‘normal’ use it’s basically just a unix box with some quirks, which along with the earlier licensing BS makes it seem like a lot of effort for very little gain – compare with running something like 9front where it’s a mostly unique system and you can acquire the entire thing for free without much effort.

          Can someone explain why this is useful / interesting to do?

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            What’s the point of this?

            It makes the OP happy. What other justification does he need?

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              Ok, that’s cool. But this is a guide on installing it and he doesn’t really give me a reason to do any of that. He said part of his reason for installing it is to pass the knowledge on to the next generation, but he just utterly fails to give any kind of reason on why this is worthwhile knowledge to pass on if you’re not working literally as a sysadmin on wallstreet

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              They say why, it’s the first sentence

              Some people retire and buy an open top sports car or big motorbike. Up here in Orkney the weather can change every day, so instead of buying a fast car with an open top, when I retired, I got z/OS running on my laptop for the similar sort of price! This means I can continue “playing” with z/OS and MQ, and helping the next generation to use z/OS. At the end of this process I had the software installed on my laptop, many unwanted DVDs, and a lot of unnecessary cardboard

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                Calling z/OS a “unix box with quirks” is underselling it extremely. It’s quite a bizarre OS branch people know little about, but that’s because IBM has no hobbyist program and you only see it if you’re basically MIS at a Fortune 500.

                I don’t think there’s too much other than licensing bullshit in the OP either (it’s thin otherwise); he’d be better off using literally anything z/PDT for hyucks.

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                  Calling z/OS a “unix box with quirks” is underselling it extremely.

                  And yet neither this blogpost, nor the wikipage for the operating system does anything to disabuse me of this notion, and there doesn’t seem to be any feature of this that is useful for someone running it on something that isn’t a mainframe.

                  I don’t think there’s too much other than licensing bullshit in the OP either (it’s thin otherwise); he’d be better off using literally anything z/PDT for hyucks.

                  yup