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    It actually looks quite nice, except that the function keys (and it seems a few more I can’t make out) have been degraded to “hidden” keys, that have to be accessed using “fn”, like a laptop. I get this when your keyboard space is limited by the frame of a portable device, but is this really necessary for a stand-alone keyboard?

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      The “function keys” are painful on the HHKBL2. F1 and SHUT IT DOWN WITH NO RECOURSE being next to each other and a user that fatfingers a lot do not mix well.

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        Hold my 40% and watch this…

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          I get this when your keyboard space is limited by the frame of a portable device, but is this really necessary for a stand-alone keyboard?

          It often comes down to a matter of ergonomics and available space. If you have a smaller desk or much more equipment, sometimes you can’t arrange to fit a truly full sized keyboard.

          The ideal keyboard has a key for everything you want to type, and takes no room. Everything else is engineering tradeoffs.

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            I get this when your keyboard space is limited by the frame of a portable device, but is this really necessary for a stand-alone keyboard?

            Even on a non-portable design, reducing the amount of movement your fingers have to make is really helpful for reducing RSI.

            That said, putting fn off in the corner where it’s difficult to hit when you have an enormous space bar wasting real estate is just silly.

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            In case anyone is interested on my take on keyboards, I’m heavily in love with the Ergodox EZ. It significantly reduced RSI for me, after trying multiple split keyboards: https://raymii.org/s/articles/Split_keyboards_a_five_year_review_including_the_ErgoDox_EZ_Matias_Ergo_Pro_and_Kinesis_Freestyle_2.html

            I do still want a hhkb due to it being one of the few Topre keyboards (specific switch)

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              It’s not just UNIX. Older keyboards for various terminals and systems had the control key where the capslock key is nowadays. WordStar’s keyboard layout was built around this and WordStar for DOS came with a little utility that would remap Caps Lock to Control on the PC.

              (I still weep at the Amiga keyboard…instead of a full sized caps lock key or a full sized control key, you got a monstrosity of having both a control and a caps lock key shoved into the same amount of space…)

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                That’s basically advertising, isn’t it?

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                  First thing I do is always remap CapsLock to a second control. On Linux I have a patched /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc (not the best method as you have to repatch it on updates, yes, but I found it more reliable than xmodmap when changing out keyboards. The xorg.conf in the comments is probably a better approach), on Mac it’s in the System Preferences and on Windows I keep a .reg file around that just has key mapping updates.

                  The author mentions the HappyHacking Lite keyboard. I always though the regular HH were overpriced (as are most Topre switch keyboard) and they just don’t feel as good as other mechanicals (some argue Topre’s aren’t mechanicals because they still have a dome/spring system). IIRC the Lite keyboard doesn’t even use Torpe’s and is still overpriced!

                  I also get the dedicated arrow key things. I use a tiling window manager and have a lot of “Mod+Mod+arrow” mappings. I’d either have to remap/releard all of those or need four held keys to resize a window. I tried a Poker out for a few weeks and can’t remember which approach I took, but I abandoned it in frustration.

                  Other than the Control mapping, I don’t like any of those other changes. I use ~ a lot and I don’t think flipping | and backspace would really change anything for me. But it all really depends on your common use cases and such.

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                    I feel like there’s just not a lot of useful innovation in keyboards. Overall, people have started to realize that the keyboard is basically the last place you should cheap out, which is good, but there really aren’t many interesting ideas in the functionality department.

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                      What functionality do you think is missing from a keyboard? It’s pretty much “hit a button, do an action on the computer” type interface. The only other functionality my keyboard has is that it could probably be used to beat a home invader into submission (it’s an IBM model M I’ve been using for the past 20 years).

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                        Well, my hands aren’t flat, and they aren’t fixed. So, the adjustable models in the OP are a start; but my fingers have multiple dimensions they can move in; why are we stuck with pushing switches down? Why is the set of keys so small?

                        I guess I should have said that “input devices” are stuck in a very low local maximum, rather than picking on keyboards.

                        (That last one is because “USB is a train wreck”)

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                      The Control key moved to the Caps Lock keys usual position. […] I can’t imagine why anyone thought Caps Lock should have had this prominent of placement.

                      That’a one of the first things I do on new system installs. Also, most X11/xkb configs allow mapping left + right Shift to act as a Caps Lock (which is IMO more convenient and intuitive than a dedicated key).

                      Section "InputClass"
                      	Identifier "Keyboards"
                      	MatchIsKeyboard "yes"
                      	Option "XkbLayout" "us,ru"
                      	Option "XkbVariant" "mac,mac"
                      	Option "XkbOptions" "grp:rwin_toggle,ctrl:nocaps,shift:both_capslock"
                      EndSection
                      

                      Note: grp:rwin_toggle switches layouts using right meta key.

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                        I always throw this into my .xprofile:

                        setxkbmap -option caps:swapescape
                        

                        That swaps the esc and caps keys. Very handy for vim.

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                          I’ve always mapped caps to ctrl, but recently have been forced to use a MacBook (touchbar) at work. As a user of vi bindings everywhere I can, the lack of a tactile escape key was too much to bear so I’m using Karabriner Elements to use caps as ctrl when held and esc when pressed alone.

                          I have to say that there’s no going back after this switch—total game changer for me. Of course, I now can no longer use anyone else’s machine.

                          The same can be achieved in X.org with setxkbmap as above for your caps/control switch, combined with xcape for the esc tap feature.

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                          YEEESSSSS! You can also remap caps lock to control on macOS under Preferences -> Keyboards -> Modifier Keys… or on Windows via registry edits.