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    Golang.org is Gone go golang.org
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    Community replacement for godoc.org for people who don’t buy into pkg.go.dev: https://godocs.io.

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      This seems really clickbaity

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        From the ‘About’ page …

        This is a fork of gddo, the software which previously powered the now-defunct godoc.org, operated by Drew DeVault. The source code is available on sr.ht.

        Anyone here have context around the situation that led to the fork? I must have entirely missed this (but that’s not surprising as I only tinker with Golang).

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          Godoc.org used to be an independent, open source site that Google bought just to cancel and replace with proprietary bloat that takes >10x longer to render, and won’t display documentation for except for licenses deemed acceptable by Google, in particular it rejects public domain and WTFPL. Some people dislike that and decided to do something about it.

          I never cared about “silly” licenses like the WTFPL, but now I am tempted to license all my code under WTFPL. Google won’t allow the use of WTFPL code internally, which for me is absolutely great.

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            Godoc.org used to be an independent, open source site that Google bought just to cancel and replace with proprietary bloat …

            You posted the same lies on HN. Please stop.

            Longer reply there: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=29314711.

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              But the part about licenses is correct.

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                Something like this would be better then, if one wanted to be inflammatory but more correct:

                Godoc.org used to be an independent, open source site that Google agreed to take stewardship over, just to cancel and replace with proprietary bloat that takes >10x longer to render, and won’t display documentation for except for licenses deemed acceptable by Google, in particular it rejects public domain and WTFPL. Some people dislike that and decided to do something about it.

                EDIT: I see from the rest of the hacker news discussion that the replacement isn’t proprietary. I can’t comment on the bloat/performance aspect, new site seems fast to me. That really only leaves the licensing stuff.

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                  If people haven’t granted the right to display the documentation then sites probably shouldn’t display it, right?

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                WTFPL is problematic in general because the public domain doesn’t exist in all jurisdictions, which is why CC-Zero exists. If your goal is to build free software that other people can reuse, I wouldn’t recommend it.

                If your goal is to spite Google, use something like AGPL instead.

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                  the public domain doesn’t exist in all jurisdictions

                  Which is exactly the reason cited for the creation of WTFPL. It’s basically CC-less-than-zero (and it predates CC0 by several years).

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                  … and I’ll bet doesn’t work well on non-Chrome (maybe non-Firefox?) browsers either - and thus not on Plan 9. Whereas godocs.io seems to work nicely on Netsurf.

                  Edit: To my surprise, it (somewhat) does, albeit with horrendously broken layout.

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                    Can confirm (from my experience) on Firefox that pkg.go.dev has some… paper cuts, whereas on Chrome I haven’t run into any issues. godocs.io on the other hand has worked flawlessly on both and is my go to.

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                Does anyone have some context? No idea what the story is here.

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                  Is the gotip playground still available?

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                    For now it seems to work: https://gotipplay.golang.org/p/kmLRcsXGxSs