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    This is scary and immoral as shit.

    I’ve used and heard only good things about F-Secure’s Freedome. The advantages include a simple-ish UI, corporate branding from a security company and that it stems from Finland, which isn’t exactly Switzerland but has a history of trying to remain neutral.

    Some other VPNs, especially cheap ones, feel creepy sometimes, so it’s of paramount importance you can trust your VPN provider!

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      I find “That One Privacy Site” to be a good starting point when evaluating the trustworthiness of VPN or email providers:

      https://thatoneprivacysite.net/vpn-section/

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        PIA was great in terms of reliability and speed, but I felt like I didn’t know who they were or why I should trust them. I’m now using ProtonMail’s VPN service, which seems noticeably slower, but I feel like they’re more trustworthy. (Maybe I’ve just been pwned by their advertising.)

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        This advice should be expanded. Do not under any circumstance use any kind of 3rd party VPN at all.

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          VPNs are this decade’s antivirus.

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            This advice is hyperbolic…. there are tons of valid uses for a 3rd party VPN. For example, I use a 3rd party VPN to torrent over networks that punish me for doing so (LTE, university WiFi).

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              OK… this is not very helpful advice. But, if you have something constructive to say on the subject, I’d like to hear it!

              I don’t suppose you’re saying that you should just trust your ISP.

              Perhaps you’re saying that you should set up and maintain your own VPN? Do you have any helpful resources to suggest for those of us who might want to do that? Because I can imagine a few ways to get that wrong too.

              But perhaps more to the point, what do you suggest for less technical people who are concerned about their privacy, or those who don’t want to maintain that much infrastructure?

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                I don’t suppose you’re saying that you should just trust your ISP.

                If you’re using a VPN service, that’s exactly what you’re doing - just trusting the VPN operator.

                But perhaps more to the point, what do you suggest for less technical people who are concerned about their privacy, or those who don’t want to maintain that much infrastructure?

                “If you’re telling people not to buy these rocks, what do you suggest for people who are concerned about keeping tigers away and can’t afford fences and guns?”

                If you genuinely need to access the internet without being tracked, you need to put the legwork in and use Tor; this is not something you can afford to trust someone else to do for you (though there are bundled installers etc. that can make it slightly easier).

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                  Sometimes I trust my VPN operator more than my ISP. Thus using the VPN is nicer

                  Example cases:

                  • being in China
                  • airport wifi
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                    Using tor for many tasks is no harder than a vpn anyway

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                    There was another blog post not too long ago about not using VPNs. This article does state all the reasons to use a VPN: protect your from your ISP and protect your location data.

                    However a VPN isn’t TOR. They can still keep logs on the VPN side and turn them over to police, even in other countries. It has a limited use and people need to understand what those uses are. Too many people use it without understand what VPNs do and don’t do (similar to the confusion around Private Window browsing .. even though there’s a clear wall of text describing the limitations, most people don’t read it).

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                    I’d argue that pretty much anyone who reads this site has the wherewithal to set up their own VPN. Check out Streissand or Algo

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                    What else would you expect from a VPN run by Facebook?

                    .. And what else would you expect from a fiber connection provided by Google? People have been happily using Google’s connections for a long time now, seemingly completely oblivious to what Google does. It’s baffling.

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                      I believe it’s a bit more complicated than this. The original promise of Onavo was to reduce your bandwidth consumption, and as a result get more bang for your buck on your current data plan. In exchange for this benefit, you had no choice but to get tracked.

                      Until FB offers visible benefits, adoption will remain low. Once they do offer large benefits, it’ll be unfortunately off to the races…