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    In a lot of ways, when people decide to choose a Mac, they first decide that they will buy an official macOS computer and second they will decide the form factor that fits their life. As the author points out, if you don’t care about Unix and you don’t care about the aesthetic then, other being a stable platform that supports a lot of things (just like Windows), there isn’t much reason to use a macOS computer.

    Maybe I’m looking too far into the future, but are there still a lot of people who use full-on Intel computers for all of their media and storage? I get the feeling that these computers are being replaced by ARM devices constantly connected to the Internet. It is entirely possible that Apple see that use-case dwindling and decide to stop updating the Mac Mini because of that.

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      Maybe I’m looking too far into the future, but are there still a lot of people who use full-on Intel computers for all of their media and storage? I get the feeling that these computers are being replaced by ARM devices constantly connected to the Internet.

      Depending what you mean by “media and storage” I mostly agree with your observation. However, I don’t think either of our intuitions necessarily reflects Apple’s decision making process. Intel is marketing the NUC units surprisingly hard, I do not perceive that market as shrinking, and thus couldn’t claim Apple has a reason to abandon it.

      For context, I know a few companies who have bought NUCs for employees recently (or similar from other brands). One even bought them for their developers over laptops, plus nice 4K screens. They are not a company whose choices I hold in high regard, however, so take that as you will. There is even a local store that adds the RAM and SSD to barebones NUC, Brix or ZBOX models, and then sells them bundled with monitors, keyboards and mice to companies in need of replacing their old collections of 2006-era Dell whatevers.

      My personal technology choices don’t track either of our predictions either, but I don’t see myself as a good example of the technology habits of the broader population. I’ve been steadily replacing many of my ARM-based systems: chucked by ODROID C1 and RPi in favor of ZBOX CI323 Nano, little 2-bay QNAP soon to be replaced by x86-64 machine running FreeNAS.