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    I’m really positively surprised by this review. It’s really amazing how far TempleOS went and I do appreciate the reporting in this article going over the technical merits without diving too much into the current condition of it’s author.

    Before you make fun of this OS, let me ask you one question. When was the last time when your pet project was used during a CTF?

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      It’s also an example of the scale of work you can do if you pick one thing and keep at it for a while. The history page on the web site is interesting, some good history then the last paragraph diverges pretty far: http://www.templeos.org/Wb/Home/Wb2/History.html

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        It’s also amazing how much he’s willing to share about his work. There’s a ton of documents and hours of videos to check for those interested in his OS. Obviously, a part of it is hard to follow due to his condition, but it’s still a great attitude.

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      Watching the linked video there’s a lot of cool stuff (including some stuff relevant to the recent thread about improving Unix shells) but I can’t help but feel sad watching this video. The guy sounds so sad and lonely, he’s so full of fear and hate, and what he’s produced is simultaneously innovative and pathetically limited.

      The HN thread linked the VICE article about Terry.

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        By using the hyperlink system that permeates the operating system, the shell itself can act as an explorer.

        This is great, I have seen similar things in other shells, but none that would make me ditch the GUI explorer.

        You can even use Type to show .BMP files directly in the shell. It raises an interesting challenge for other OSs – why do shells have to be pure text?

        Sounds like it has lots of good ideas, it would be great if he could get some backing to add some shine for it, maybe break away from 640x480…

        If a crash in one users’ programs could take down all the others, then obviously that would be bad. But for a personal computer, with just one user, this makes no sense.

        An OS can also provide general computer stability and protecting you and your data from your applications, ie. preventing an application from exhausting all available memory, looking at your private files, phoning home, spying on what you type in, or doing something dodgy and then resetting a globally available flag to “no I didn’t do anything dodgy”.

        Very interesting OS, much more unique features than the average “hobby OS”. Good job Terry!

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          Sounds like it has lots of good ideas, it would be great if he could get some backing to add some shine for it, maybe break away from 640x480…

          They do see TermKit, Terminology, FinalTerm etc. It just doesn’t get anywhere because it’s a mostly useless feature, that’s hard to standardize and make backwards compatible.

          CLI tools in Unix work best with text, you can grep ‘cat’ but we don’t have tools to grep a picture of a cat. There’s a huge limitation to composibility and expressiveness in working with rich media right now.

          Most of these terms generally become half explorer half shell. Which is pretty useless because explorers themselves don’t make file navigation any “easier” in most circumstances. The easier tasks in an explorer is manually selecting a set of files that is contiguous that is smaller than the screen or selecting a non contiguous set of files smaller than 10 that fits on the screen, the rest causes explorers to degenerate to shell like behavior without the extensibility of an actual shell.

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            An OS can also provide general computer stability and protecting you and your data from your applications, ie. preventing an application from exhausting all available memory, looking at your private files, phoning home, spying on what you type in

            Yes, it could, but normal GNU/Linux defaults don’t help with these problems much, if at all. Android is slightly better, but not that much. Linux’s security system is not designed for this, and getting it to do this is a struggle.

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            I wonder how much of his own personal experience would translate to being a developer for a more popular operating system.

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              There was a reason why people switched from OSes that let you control and screw around freely (like Windows 9x, Mac OS 9) to ones that don’t and enforce memory protection - stability. Remember extension conflicts?