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    Congratulations on launching, and thank you for releasing the code under MIT (I admit the more I read, the more I feared it was closed source, until I got to the relevant paragraph…).

    The actual doc sites, seem good -but the splash/home page could use some love on mobile.

    That is, I like the look of:

    https://little.webby.press/documentation/en/getting-started/book/getting-started.html

    (the important part - I take it this is how the website part of the output looks?)

    But this could look better on a phone:

    https://little.webby.press/#documentation

    I just had a look at the epub, and it looks OK - but it doesn’t play so well with dark mode in FBReader (quite common for epubs that uses images with backgrounds filled in etc). I’m not sure what the current state of theme/css is for epub - if some thing like this would/should work (with proper rules for shifting to “dark” images/illustration)? :

    https://css-tricks.com/dark-modes-with-css/

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      Thanks for the kind words and feedback, I really appreciate it.

      The webapp has not been designed with mobile in mind because originally all the workflow was drag and drop based and that does not play well with mobile anyway. An important thing to notice, is that the webapp is used usually on the same machine that you write your content on, which is usually not a smartphone. The current layout works on desktop and on tablets. Still, there is no harm whatsoever in being a good citizen on smartphones. I’ll fix that.

      As for dark mode on epubs, I suspect the CSS support in eReaders is not yet up to those standards. In a quick glance in the EPUB spec, I can only find references to DOM Level 2 style. I know that iBooks support lots of nifty features including JS, but usual eReaders like Kindles and Kobos don’t have such advanced features. It is also important to notice that many eReaders will simply override styling and fonts with their own. You have less control over styling than on web. I suspect that many of those “inverted modes” on eReaders are done with overrides that force a specific colorscheme. I’m not sure. I’ll look into it.

      (the important part - I take it this is how the website part of the output looks?)

      And you’re right, that is how it looks. There is a landing site and a reading experience. For the documentation, I have only enabled the reading experience. The landing site should render well on mobile too. You can create your own templates as well, so if you want to play with the CSS, there is a way to do it which I still need to document.

      Don’t know if you’ve watched the embedded video but, in it I go over the app and show how to use it. You might like it.

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        As for dark mode on epubs, I suspect the CSS support in eReaders is not yet up to those standards. In a quick glance in the EPUB spec, I can only find references to DOM Level 2 style. I know that iBooks support lots of nifty features including JS, but usual eReaders like Kindles and Kobos don’t have such advanced features.

        For me and my use-case, I only care about dark mode on a phone/oled screen (much prefer light gray on black text, I the Kindle app or FBReader app) - while on an e-ink screen, like a Kindle device - I don’t dark mode makes much sense.