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    By now it should be obvious that making things look cool in media is not highly correlated with usability.

    This is just more evidence for that.

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      Indeed. I’ve always held great respect for folks who design the computing interfaces in science fiction visual media because it nearly always looks really cool but I learned over time that those systems are designed to advance a story while looking cool, not necessarily to be useful to real humans. LCARS is probably the greatest example of this.

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      “Note: lcarswm uses the Kotlin compiler to build, which uses the clang compiler. The used clang version needs an outdated library, libtinfo.so.5.”

      Yeah no. Interest in packaging it just went down.

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        While I would never use this (macOS is the best Linux DE), I think it’s really fucking rad that someone put this much effort into making something so detailed. I think it’s time to watch a few episodes TNG again!

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          I remember when I first started using Linux in the late 90s there were a bunch of projects trying to emulate ‘LCARS’. At the time I didn’t know what it was (despite being a computer obsessed nerd I wasn’t really into nerd fandom) so I was really confused when I managed to get one of them working and it was basically a usability nightmare.

          Eventually I figured out it was a Star Trek thing and it made more sense why people would want to use it, but in terms of day to day use KDE 1.0 was THE system to use.

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            I use the fish shell and my prompt function plays an LCARS beep selected by the exit code of the previous command. Perceived productivity is way up.

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              While I would never use this (macOS is the best Linux DE), I think it’s really fucking rad that someone put this much effort into making something so detailed. I think it’s time to watch a few episodes TNG again!

              Oohh, please share.

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                The sounds I got from Trek Core. I would prefer to synthesize beeps rather than use samples but I don’t have the expertise. I’ve looked a bit at a ChucK and SuperCollider but synthesis and routing details aside it would take a real artist to recreate something like TNG sound effects.

                In fish the prompt comes from a shell function rather than an environmental variable so its possible to call an arbitrary command like ~/bin/beep $status every time the prompt is regenerated. I keep an instance of mpv running idle and send it commands over a socket to enqueue the beep files. It could be done with a script but I use Syndicate to abstract the beep command from sending commands to mpv so that I could send beeps code over network but I haven’t tested it. Some rainy day I will test and publish it.