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    I work for DO and poked the relevant team to update that post. Thanks for pointing it out!

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      Thank you so much!

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        Thank you :) I have been told the post in question has been updated! I’ll poke at it myself once I finish up today but I think that should have been fixed. Thanks again for bringing it up!

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      this is also my experience navigating the serverless space few years ago (after having first tried it in 2016)

      I like to blame it on the version backward incompatibility of these technology and the over spun of press cycle(because they want to win the cloud native war) which led to a tons of out-of-date documentations being left over on the internet.. Worse, these out-of-date press cycle are often way better SEO, AMP equipped than a dev blog thus they showed up on your google search result before what you are actually looking for.

      Also: most of these technology rely on YAML as an ‘no code’ abstraction for complex concepts and system. You are then having to navigate a weak typed, weak structure config file to describe a complex distributed system with replication rules. I think there are places for yaml but not with k8s and serverless… I would like to see they move over to something with proper syntax, proper type-checking(that may compile to yaml) if possible.

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        You could try Dahl, they have created a Kubernetes specific repository: https://github.com/dhall-lang/dhall-kubernetes

        I do really dislike their formatting, but this is subjective and not mandatory

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          I do really dislike their formatting

          You mean the formatting shown on the homepage or that the dhall format tool uses?

          I’d love to get those parts of the ecosystem to change, but as you say that’s ultimately very much not part of the language. Sensible formatting of Dhall code is very possible, and there’s no “style guide” or anything that’s going to yell at you for doing it right just because the author of the homepage makes some quirky choices :)

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            I think that I mean the formatting from the dhall format tool. The example on the Kubernetes page is a bit weird because the dhall version of the nginx deployment is way more lines than the yaml one and a lot less readable than the yaml file. I do think these are things that put people off in using the language. A lot of people learn from examples and if these examples are not clear or counter-intuitive this would hamper the adoption of a technology.

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            yeah in my head was something more like go/typescript(or what ever your application code is) -> (json) -> yaml, not learning a whole new language with non-standard syntax just to compile to yaml.

            This is solving 1 problem by adding 2-3 others on top of a stack of complexity.

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              Yes fair enough, but then again don’t cut yourself with Occam’s Razor (it is not really his, I know). You want non-trivial things so you can expect a solution to have a certain degree of complexity. Give it a try, the syntax will grow on you

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                JSON is a subset of YAML, so there’s no need to convert from JSON to YAML.

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                  That’s one of the more terrifying thing in YAML TBH.

                  I do wonder what happens if you put “\u2028” or “\u2029” inside a YAML string (they’re valid unescaped characters in javascript strings, but not JSON strings)?

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              What makes this all worse is that Kubernetes manifests are strongly typed.

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              To everyone here who hates YAML, Pulumi looks like an interesting alternative. I haven’t yet used it though.

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                Somehow I think that’s worse. YAML and Terraform leave little room for cleverness and magic. This opens the door to it.

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                  But using cleverness to relieve tedium is our job. Work smarter, not harder, right?

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                Not at all what I expected as a post. I figured there would be much more political argument clarifying the title. Oh well.

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                  I am working on a larger rant on cargo culting Google, but I have to build up more satire juice to get on the level of this

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                    That article is a thing of beauty 😂

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                    Yeah, the subtitle was a 180 for me. At least it was there to let me know what it was actually about, though.

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                      Same. I want a reason to hate it, I have an irrational distaste towards it for some reason

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                        For me it’s all the yaml.

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                          Look at the bright side, at least it isn’t a clickbait.

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                            It is a headline bait though, the twitterverse likes to only read headlines and judge things on that. I intentionally chose the title so that people on Twitter taking it out of context would look ridiculous.

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                              Yes, so much I understood, but don’t you think that with a title like that your’re somewhat betraying the reader. Probably the next time you post, I’ll not so eager read your post. Just my two cents.

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                        I’ll point out the first of all this, the Terraform part, is nicely captured and maintained by the Typhoon project: https://typhoon.psdn.io – it works wonders across clouds and the developers do it as a for-fun completely open distro.

                        Sure, afterwards there’s all the YAML templating, to which I have no good answer, but it’s one fewer wall to bang against

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                          I don’t think Typhoon is quite the same as what the author is doing in this post. IIUC, this post shows how to set up DigitalOcean’s own Kubernetes service, rather than bootstrapping a Kubernetes cluster on raw VMs.

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                            Yeah, typhoon is really overkill for the things I’m doing. Most of what I’m really doing is just trying to make a simple setup that I can mostly ignore. Typhoon looks like it might make sense if I was doing this professionally, but I am just a hobbyist in this case.