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    I assumed that title meant “IPv6 breaks 30% of networking setups”

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      Same here. I suggested a new title of “IPv6 Adoption Breaks 30%” to help clear up any confusion.

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        Breaks what? Took me a minute to realize what you really meant was “30% of Google users now use IPv6”

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        I also assumed this, as I just had an issue on Friday with an AWS VPN and OpenVPN on Ubuntu 18.04 where I had to disable IPv6 to get it to actually resolve anything.

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        Keep in mind this is global adoption. If you focus on North America and Europe it’s even higher in the “Per-Country IPv6 adoption” tab.

        Also interesting is Akamai’s perspective: https://www.akamai.com/us/en/resources/our-thinking/state-of-the-internet-report/state-of-the-internet-ipv6-adoption-visualization.jsp

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          While the data is interesting, the color scheme is probably the worst I’ve ever seen (and the use of a log scale might not be the best one either).

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          Anybody have ideas why IPv6 adoption is consistently higher on the weekends?

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            It’s almost certainly personal use. This is due to many company networks not having DSlite, but also due to people being on mobile data plans on phones and tablets, which are a big driver for IPv6 usage as well.

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              Exactly. It’s the time when folks have the leisure time to take advantage of Comcrap offering a fully native IPV6 experience to consumers (like I did).

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                To the person who marked this comment a troll: Was it my use of “Comcrap” which I’ll admit could be seen as inflammatory? Because I was dead serious. Most of us working stiffs don’t have time to embark on a project like IPV6-ifying our home network except on the weekends when we can afford to screw it up and be down for an hour or two while we google solutions on our phones :)

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                  Was it my use of “Comcrap” which I’ll admit could be seen as inflammatory?

                  Yes.

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                    Thank you for your candor.

                    I of all people should be more sensitive about tarring employees of large corps with one brush, working for AWS myself and cringing on a regular basis when every Tom, Dick & Harry in the known universe blames me for every bad experience they ever had when the UPS guy spat on their package.

                    Similarly, you (whoever you are, and assuming you’re a Comcast employee) aren’t responsible for the numerous install and provisioning experiences that left my wife & I ready the climb the walls.

                    I will sincerely try to be better about this.

                    For what it’s worth I really appreciate Comcast’s consumer IPV6 rollout. I was able to flip a switch and convert my entire LAN, and everything worked like a charm.

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              A simple guess based on my observations in Germany right now: Many people have IPv6 connectivity at home, but not at work. Even many (most?) universites don’t provide IPv6 in their networks, especially on wireless. However, my private ISP does, and so do many others. The situation is similar in Austria, and (to my knowledge in France), so I’d expect it to hold in other places too and probably account much of this difference.

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                I can confirm that the situation is similar in France. IPv4 at work, IPv6 at home and on my phone over LTE.

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                There’s more IPv6 at home than at work.

                Why, I hear you ask. I don’t really know. My theory is that home users tend to get v6 when an ISP decides to upgrades everyone’s DSL/fiber middleboxes, while companies often have more hardware. If any of the hops from my desk to the network is v4-only, then so I am I. Home users wait for an ISP to enable v6, business users wait for all of n hops to enable v6, where n≥1. Even if n is only slightly greater than 1 on average, that will introduce some random lag compared to home users.

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                  In the US, at least one major cell carrier (T-Mobile) uses IPv6 for their mobile data network, so all handsets connect with IPv6.

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                    Oddly enough, I’ve heard an anecdote involving that that selfsame name. As you may know, the IPv4 allocation rules were tightened several times at predefined points in time as the End grew near. One of the 2-3 relevant Deutsche Telekom companies was a bit late with requesting more address space from RIPE a while ago, and was one of the first ISPs to have a big address space application rejected.

                    All of its competitors had enough address space to grow for a while without any v6 deployment hurry, having gotten allocations in just before the rule change, but not Deutsche Telekom.

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                  Maybe personal ISP plans are more likely to use DSlite or similar technologies? They can adapt faster while company plans still “need” fixed IPv4 addresses for VPN and other services

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                    My cable provider is dual stack, but by default the IPv4 is carrier grade NAT and the v6 is native. Modern OS prefer v6 over v4, but there is more v6 in customer network than in offices.

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                    Nice, but the growth also seems to have gone from exponential to linear. At 4% a year we should be starting to reach saturation around 2040.

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                      Probably an instance of the classic sigmoid curve.

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                        Probably. I was really hoping it would stay exponential though. :-(

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                      Are there any mobile operators / ISPs in Poland that provide ipv6?

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                        Yet IPv6 is still missing from many enterprise networks and from most public WiFi access points, and Twitter.com is still missing IPv6, too.

                        Between us the technical people — please don’t hate the messenger, and don’t use these conclusions in a negative context — I don’t understand why some companies still haven’t adopted IPv6, especially considering how good it’d be for tracking purposes, even with autoconfprivacy. Noone does a SWIP for a /32 on IPv4, but SWIPs on IPv6 even for /64 are relatively common. Not to mention you can also map yet differentiate between all computers of a given household and/or even the individual devices connected to a hotspot on a mobile device (AndroidAP has had full and proper IPv6 support for quite a while now — I can ssh back into my laptop from the internet without having to install any sort of tunnelling software). It’s simply brilliant if you’re a content or network operator.

                        For individual users, it’s also great to be able to ssh back into your individual boxes, and/or be able to see which machines you connect from; I actually disable autoconfprivacy on my machines for this reason, to make netstat and last on my servers work as intended; I don’t mind the extra tracking, as it consumes none of my CPU (plus, let’s be real here, there’s already plenty of ways to fingerprint users — there’s little reason why we the users should give up the convenience and the practical security for a little extra privacy).