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    This is the kind of stuff that I wish more people worked on. The Web as it reflects the world, not the stock market!

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      And the hype and herd activity of the moment.

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      So, how does it notify the user a comment has been posted? Does the server try to detect if it supports remote pingbacks (check if it’s a wordpress blog) and use that interface? What if it’s a static site like Jekyll? Does it search for an e-mail address in the RSS fed or on the site somewhere?

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        Agree, it could be clearer.

        Basically, all the data transiting between you and your server is done though microsub. This let you choose your client independently from your server.

        So, how does it notify the user a comment has been posted?

        It’ll depend on the target content. If it’s a tweet or something coming from a closed silo, it’ll interact with the remote source using the silo’s API.

        If it’s a website supporting webmentions, you’re first going to create a page on your website containing the response. This response is expressed using the microformats tags. Then your server is going to send the target server a webmention pointing to your response. The target webmention endpoint is then going to retrieve and parse your response.

        Basically, your data stays at your place.

        Does it search for an e-mail address in the RSS fed or on the site somewhere?

        Not sure if this is already implemented but it could be a good idea. (pretty complex though)

        What if it’s a static site like Jekyll?

        You can use an ad-hoc webmention service that receive them on your behalf. For instance, my website is static, I receive the webmentions though webmentions.io.

        I don’t display them yet, but some people went one step further and created a way to display the received webmentions on a static website. There are several solutions. For instance, @deluvi created this system for hugo.

        [Edit] Just to be clear: you don’t need to implement the whole micropub jazz to use webmentions. As a matter of fact, I don’t use microsub.

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        The fun part about readers is that if you already parse microformats (because replies) and display feeds of entries, all you need to add is feed polling (and some feed management). (Ideally also WebSub for real time updates, but that can come later.)

        Also, you can follow Mastodon accounts from a reader (since Mastodon has microformats) and use Bridgy Fed to interact with them :)

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          How come I manage to miss bridgy fed OO. Thank you so much for this link!

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          Is there a CMS that handles all this automatically? I found Known, but it doesn’t look like it supports markdown, which is how I would add my existing blog posts to it.

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            Sweetroll supports markdown, and you could write a mass import script that uses either micropub over HTTP or direct writes to postgres. I even wrote deployment docs… but honestly it’s still far from a CMS usable by people without a degree in Haskell, Postgres, JavaScript and rocket science :D

            WordPress with the IndieWeb Plugin is probably the easiest solution, and I’m sure there are Markdown plugins for WordPress. (And ways to mass import posts…)

            There’s also tooling for static generators like Jekyll.

            See /projects for a long list of stuff…

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              WordPress with the IndieWeb Plugin is probably the easiest solution

              Cool, just moved my entire website to WordPress from a static site.

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              known has a markdown plugin! https://github.com/idno/Markdown

              wordpress also supports all of the indieweb protocols (webmention, micropub, etc) via plugins, and has many markdown and import plugins too.

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                “4 years ago” and an open “doesn’t work” issue though :(

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              If you’re interested in this, you might find Blogmesh - a PoC on using RSS feeds for this - interesting as well. Have a look at https://blogmesh.org/