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    In video games, an oft-overlooked accessibility feature that also gets constant use is the ability to remap input to different keys/buttons. It’s so overlooked that I feel people don’t even realize it’s actually an accessibility feature, because so many people take advantage of it for simple things like, “Why would you set run to this?” The reason it’s an accessibility feature is that it allows people without the fine-motor skills to hit certain buttons or key combinations to reconfigure their input to something they can use, but again, we don’t realize that because it’s so obviously something that’s beneficial to the vast majority of players regardless.

    At its core, accessibility is about customizability, something that shows a respect by the developer for the end-user. Good customizability doesn’t even need to fully understand a cause for the need to customize (“I’m deaf” vs. “I want to eat chips”), it just needs to understand that someone has occasion to want that choice. Obviously there are accessibility features that would see more limited use outside of the direct need they’re addressing (color-blind options come to mind), but it seems to me that if your commercial software struggles to implement that particular feature then it’s a failure of software design; you hard-coded your text, or your color scheme, or your inputs, and now you feel the friction of the assumptions that went into that.

    I wonder if it wouldn’t be an easier sell to teach developers about the value of customizability as a quality indicator for their software more than trying to compel via the more moral arguments about accessibility.

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      Remapping is quite big in PC gaming – from the Quake tradition of console/autoexec binds that still persists in even very distant descendants like CS:GO to the bindings editor in SteamVR, there are lots of amazing examples, but even the average 2000s console port usually has some mapping menu.

      easier sell to teach developers about the value of customizability

      Well, for big serious products, you might have to deal with something else: not developers ignoring customizability, but business/marketing heads being obsessed with Bringing a Complete Vision™ and Unified Experience®, i.e. specifically selling non-customizability as a feature.

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        Obviously there are accessibility features that would see more limited use outside of the direct need they’re addressing (color-blind options come to mind)

        I have a non-accessibility use for color-blindness support: my telephone is primarily an e-reader, so I got one with a black and white e-ink screen. I was shocked, shocked! at how dramatically that narrowed my software options. (Totally worth it, though.)

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          interesting, which model is it? my current phone is slowly dying and I’m considering buying something weird to replace it.

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            Hisense A5 pro. It does not officially support Google Services Framework. There are guides online for how to get it kind of mostly working. I’m okay with that, but YMMV.