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    I’d love to see how many comments in the source include the f-word. I suspect more than a few.

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      Ah, this is great. I can finally stop using oh-my-zsh now that I know how to replicate the features I care about.

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          No, this is awesome to know! This seems to be a link aggregator after all. Plus, the point of the blog post was just to list some gripes about a language that the author really loves.

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          Multiple string types and relevant traits beget multiple conversion functions:

          I did miss Cows in the string types comparison too and although I agree with the sibling comment that Rust just shows you footguns that are really there I agree that this can be a little bit confusing. String types, and in general references seriously impact how one designs the API so this is not a trivial matter.

          Sometimes rustc needs me to add where Self: Sized to my static (…)

          I believe it has something to do with object safety. This issue actually uncovers one thing that people keep talking about: no written standard for Rust exists.

          I actually enjoy reading books about languages but the existing Rust books just scratch the surface of Rust as language. I think I read all available books on Rust on the internet but only one got deep enough to cover differences between Fn, FnOnce, FnMut and using more specialized std APIs like PhantomData.

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            I actually enjoy reading books about languages but the existing Rust books just scratch the surface of Rust as language. I think I read all available books on Rust on the internet but only one got deep enough to cover differences between Fn, FnOnce, FnMut and using more specialized std APIs like PhantomData.

            I really liked Programming Rust by Jim Blandy and Jason Orendorff. It also covers Fn* and PhantomData.

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              Yes, that’s the book I’ve been referring to :) And I liked it very much too. I’m glad that Jim is writing 2nd edition now and I’ll blindly buy it and read it. Even though I’ve overgrown the initial pains the writing style is very nice and the last chapter about integration with libgit2 was really impressive.

              I had high hopes for the Rust Programming Language book thinking it would be more like a spec covering everything but unfortunately some advanced concepts were just briefly mentioned.

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                That’s how I felt with the book too, I ended up having to ask a bunch of questions of my friends of concepts that aren’t in the book… I should give Programming Rust a try

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                  Depending on your journey you may already know a lot of what’s in Programming Rust but thinking from a longer perspective that’s actually that one book which I’d recommend reading about Rust. (Rust in Action has nice fragments esp building a kernel but it’s still not finished and not exhaustive enough).

                  Maybe that’s just me but it seems like most Rust book authors think that Rust is complex but people want a “for dummies” book and spend a lot of time with borrow checker and syntax trivia instead of proper in depth treatment. I’d kill for a proper Advanced Rust book instead of collecting random knowledge across the internet.

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                  And I liked it very much too. I’m glad that Jim is writing 2nd edition now and I’ll blindly buy it and read it.

                  Same here! I was really happy to see that they are keeping the book in sync with recent Rust changes.

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              Kakoune users would be pleased.

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                Naive question: Is there really so much being written about Kakoune? Emacs and Vi/Vim have a history and “philosophy” (for lack of a better term), I’m not sure if this is the case with newer editors.

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                  I would say that, in terms of philosophy, Kakoune is a solid contender for the most interesting editor: https://kakoune.org/why-kakoune/why-kakoune.html.

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                    Sorry, but I’m missing what’s new… It seems like a better vim, but just from looking at the features I don’t see a totally new approach.

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                      I would say that verb noun vs noun verb is a huge difference. Embracing of multi-selection model is also novel. The plugin API is quite different from most other editors as well.

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                        I can’t seem to find anything notable on the plugin API, could you give an example? Regarding the other point, I fail to see what’s novel. “verb noun” vs “noun verb” seems like a matter of historical coincidence, and multi-selection/cursors has existed before in sublime and has been improved in editors like vis.

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                          Sorry, I don’t really want this to turn into back and forth dialog :) It’s totally ok if you have different concept of what novelty is. You can find more info about extending neovim in the docs.

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                For my personal hostnames, I use Pokemon names, but sometimes they mean something. My server that hosts a Discord bot is called litten because the bot it hosts is cat-themed. Come to think of it, the rest don’t mean anything at all. croagunk, houndoom, forretress Oh wait forretress is the home server lol.