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    It’s interesting how the HTTP protocol specifications are ignored by nearly everyone. I’ve never seen any 451, just 404.

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      Try browsing a US newspaper site from the EU. Many use 451 to passive-aggressively protest against GDPR requirements.

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        It was approved by the IESG on December 18, 2015.[9] It was published as RFC 7725 in February 2016.

        It’s pretty recent so I’m not surprised it’s not widely picked up yet.

        Also, 404 isn’t wrong in these cases, 451 is just more specific. Usually telling “this thing is not there” is easier than also figuring out the reason why.

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          What about the case when the resource is publically available, but not for the requester for legal reasons (e.g. being in a European country)? In that case, does the 404 status still make sense?

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            No, but I wasn’t thinking about that case, as parent mentioned 404 (I actually did, but quite a bit later after I wrote that comment). In absence of 451, 403 would be suitable in situation you mentioned, but 451 is much less ambiguous for these cases.

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        • Get rid of “hello” and “bye”, along with custom footers. Your name is in the “From” field of each e-mail, and your position can be pulled out from Active Directory or something.
        • Use double enters to make separate paragraphs. Don’t let your e-mail to be a “wall of text”.
        • Check typos in your e-mails. Or use a spell-checker if you’re too lazy.
        • Seriously, being too lazy is NOT a good thing. Really. Don’t brag about it.
        • DO include a short context about the problem you’re having with some issue, along with a link to the issue. Link itself is not enough.
        • DO NOT use bold text, or italic text, or different colors of your font, or use it very rarely. There’s 95% chance it will be abused. And it will happen that some people will send very important e-mails consisting of only bold letters (even with the footer), because of such critical importance of such email. And later, when everyone will start using bold letters, nobody will notice them anymore.
        • HTML can be used for good. Like, for example, using links to issues, not for changing the formatting of the text.
        • Do not place links to Jira, Redmine or whatever, inline in your e-mail. Use references[1], like this[2], and put the links on the bottom of the message, or use HTML and use normal hyperlinks.
        • If the company uses top-posting when replying, DON’T reply using inline replies. Same thing in the reverse direction. A good rule can be: use whatever convention is used by the person you’re exchanging e-mails with.
        • When replying, trim footers of the previous person (you can leave the signature, but again, the name will be visible anyway in the From field).
        • Don’t use custom characters when using inline replies, use standard one like this: “>”
        • If pasting code, format it with a monospaced font, or at least make an effort with formatting it, so that the person who will read it later will have it easier. If using text mode and pasting code, consider using ‘#v+’ and ‘#v-’ markers.
        • If writing a longer e-mail, summarize it on the end.
        • If writing a longer e-mail, try to put a TL;DR version on the top of the mail. Then, consider if this TL;DR version can be sent instead of the longer message. If yes, remove the longer message and send TL;DR version as the actual message (the longer the message is, the smaller chance is that everyone will read it).
        • Again, if you’re writing a longer e-mail, double make sure the recipients will understand what is it you ask/expect from them.
        • If you want to say “I don’t know”, include the next best thing that comes to your mind when you think about a solution to some problem.
        • Remember that an e-mail is written once, and can be read hundreds of times by hundreds of people. Make an effort to spell-check, format, structure it and minimize it (unless you’re writing a poem).
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          I agree with most of your post.

          Get rid of “hello” and “bye”, along with custom footers. Your name is in the “From” field of each e-mail, and your position can be pulled out from Active Directory or something.

          Custom footers I can see either way. They’re noisy, but it also can be useful context. But do say “hi” or “thanks”. People appreciate some warmth.

          If writing a longer e-mail, try to put a TL;DR version on the top of the mail. Then, consider if this TL;DR version can be sent instead of the longer message. If yes, remove the longer message and send TL;DR version as the actual message (the longer the message is, the smaller chance is that everyone will read it).

          Good advice. One slightly different spin: if you can’t substitute the TL;DR version, it’s highly likely that you’ve created a document that deserves to live longer than the email you’re writing. Ask yourself whether you should give it a permanent home (e.g. a wiki) after writing the email.

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            But do say “hi” or “thanks”. People appreciate some warmth.

            I include these for the first email I send to someone I don’t regularly correspond with, and omit them after that.

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              That’s probably right, I was reacting to what I perceived as a blanket rule. And I suppose I’d never write “bye”, but “best”, “thanks” or something similar.

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            Get rid of “hello” and “bye”, along with custom footers. Your name is in the “From” field of each e-mail, and your position can be pulled out from Active Directory or something.

            E-Mail is not instant messaging. In the latter you can omit the greeting/opening, but personally, I consider e-mails without opening and closing just rude. If the reason for the omission of opening and closing is that you exchange a whole series of e-mails with a specific person in a single day, you’re using the wrong medium. Use an instant messager.

            Not so long ago, I wrote a (German) blogpost about IM vs. e-mail, albeit it was in a totally different context (security).

            As for footers, it is not unusual that they are legally required.

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              It really depends on the context. If you’re writing an e-mail to someone for the first time today, a greeting might not be a bad idea, especially when you’ll probably still use a greeting even if using instant messaging. But I don’t think any further followups or replies require greetings, but still many people use them. It’s not an issue that needs to be resolved, but I just don’t think it’s necessary.

              As for footers, it also depends on the context. I don’t think footers are legally required when exchanging e-mails inside the company. They may be required when a person needs to contact people outside of the company. But when such a person sends an e-mail to another person in the company, it can look unnecessary to include a “yes” or “no” answer, following with a footer message that is larger than 2 pages.

              Also I can’t agree with the theory that instant messaging is a fundamentally different method of communication than e-mails. It can be used this way; but I don’t think there should be a pressure to reply instantly if a message will arrive on an IM communicator. If I’m busy, absent, or in a bad mood, I don’t answer IMs. I may answer them 3 hours later. I don’t see it as a problem. If a person is in a hurry, there’s always a high priority phone call that can be made.

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                Hello,

                Why is it rude in e-mail, but not in your message on Lobsters?

                Kind regards,

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                  Good question! While your messages in lobsters may be in response to an earlier comment by a particular individual, the norms are different because it’s a discussion board, in which comments are generally meant to be read by many individuals.

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                    (Intentionally without a greeting)

                    Because lobste.rs is not a replacement for snail mail. lobste.rs is not 1-to-1 communication, but a 1-to-many and many-to-one communication.

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                      E-mail is also not 1-to-1 communication, I am not the only recipient for the vast majority of e-mails I receive.

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                        When I made my original statement, I only had 1-to-1 e-mails in mind. Public discussion media like mailing lists work over e-mail, technically, but are not what I experience as the normal use of e-mail. My original statement applies to the personal 1-to-1 communication, where e-mail replaces the written letter. Letters are not written without openings and closings, and so shouldn’t be 1-to-1 e-mails. I don’t write greetings in mailing list e-mails either, except for the opening e-mail of a thread.

                        Maybe I’m just conservative.

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                  Do not place links to Jira, Redmine or whatever, inline in your e-mail. Use references[1], like this[2], and put the links on the bottom of the message, or use HTML and use normal hyperlinks.

                  I disagree with this one. Especially in an email with lots of links and/or text. I find it annoying to have to scroll to the bottom, find the corresponding link, then scroll back up and find my place again from where I was reading.

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                    Get rid of “hello” and “bye”, along with custom footers. Your name is in the “From” field of each e-mail, and your position can be pulled out from Active Directory or something.

                    I’ve come around to this.

                    For those of us who have been around the block a few dozen times, signatures are a hold over from the USENET days, when there was no LDAP or AD or whatever and your .signature was a part of your flair :)

                    But in today’s corporate world, they’re just extra noise.

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                      LDAP and AD does assume it is intra-corporate email isn’t it?

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                        Is that really where it comes from? I’d assume it comes from signatures in writing physical letters.

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                          Well, sure, that’s where the word originated, but I’m saying it was popularized by USENET and early E-mail.

                          Here’s the USENET “Netiquette” document circa 1993/5 but I’m quite sure it goes back MUCH farther. I know I saw E-mail .sigs in wide use in the late 80s when I was on the internet.

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                        Adding to this:

                        • Avoid using passive voice. It adds more, useless, words. Also, complicates the structure of your text, tiring your readers and sometimes even confusing them.
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                          Passive voice is to be avoided. More useless words are added by it, and the complexity of the structure of your text is increased by it, as well as the energy and sometimes even confusion levels of your readers.

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                            This sentence is clear, but reading passive voice all day will surely tire you.

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                          HTML can be used for good. Like, for example, using links to issues, not for changing the formatting of the text.

                          Agree.

                          Do not place links to Jira, Redmine or whatever, inline in your e-mail. Use references[1], like this[2], and put the links on the bottom of the message, or use HTML and use normal hyperlinks.

                          Wait what? This seems directly contradictory to the previous statement. Why are links to issue trackers (Jira/Redmine/whatever) exempt from the previous example of good use of HTML links in email?

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                            I think what was meant was this:

                            Please see issue 1234 (https://foo.jira.com/browse/ABC-1234)

                            versus this:

                            Please see issue 1234 [1].

                            [1] https://foo.jira.com/browse/ABC-1234

                            If you’re using inline HTML, then it would be an actual link:

                            Please see issue 1234

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                              Yes, that’s what I meant, thanks!