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      I feel that the near-monthly article about the “demise” of RSS misses one crucial point: while the perceived fraction of people using RSS may have gone down over the last decade, it is largely because newer Internet users are more on board with curated news feeds, and RSS users fragmented towards alternatives to Google reader, making them more difficult to see. Virtually all of the GReader users I knew of at the time of shutdown still use Feedly, NewsBlur, or Innoreader.

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        I agree. RSS is not dead, but those who think that “RSS didn’t take over the entire internet, so it must be dead” are wrong. It’s still a crucial part of podcasts, and many major blog platforms still support it. There are many, many mobile and desktop RSS clients.

        But yea, this recurring meme of “RIP RSS” is getting really tiresome.

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          Innoreader ,o/

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          Still on my language tinySelf. Since last time I’ve posted here I’ve implemented tail call optimization and all kind of stuff, so it is possible to run basic scripts. It is still kind of fragile and impractical, but I am slowly getting there. Yesterday, I’ve measured the speed and it is really slow, but that is probably ok, since there is no optimizations yet.

          I’ve done a lot of work around, like created a series of article in Czech language about the interpreter, which should be fun, because there is not really anything like that on the Czech net. I’ve also written small series of articles about Self and it should be finished soon, so that was fun too.

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              I think they would laugh at my measly gigabytes.

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              As always, my full list is here: http://kitakitsune.org/raw/doctene_knihy.txt

              This year is the first time I’ve done writeup on books I liked in english: Books that changed my point of view.

              I would definitely recommend:

              Best book this year so far was definitely Mastery.

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                Books I enjoyed in 2018 and think are worth reading include:

                • [fiction] Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality; basically the Harry Potter universe except Harry is taught the scientific method from a young age, which leads him to approach magic in a completely different way. I never thought I’d like any fan fiction, but this was really amazing!
                • [non-fiction] Sync: The Emerging Science of Spontaneous Order; this book examines the phenomenon of synchronisation, looking at examples from nature and from man-made machines. It’s very accessible and a fairly easy read, while going into enough detail to be thought provoking.
                • [fiction] Old Man and the Sea; I think this is one of Hemmingway’s shortest stories (which is why I read it). I found the book very powerful and worth the time.
                • [fiction] The Kite Runner; Another very popular book about somebody who grows up in 80’s Afganistan, sees the transition from it being a peaceful country to it being a war torn one, and then moves to the US as a refugee. It was probably one of the most moving books I’ve ever read, and I want to read ‘A thousand splendid suns’, which is by the same author, soon.
                • [non-fiction] Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto; A rather opinionated take on climate change and politics. Makes very strong arguments for technological solutions to climate change such as nuclear power and GMO’s, though it is controversial in the field for precisely this reason. It’s quite long, but I really enjoyed it.
                1. 2

                  Loved the Kite Runner, can indeed recommend that you read more of the same author. It does get a bit “same, same” after a while. So I also recommend reading a few other authors before you come back.

                  The Old Man and the Sea, funnily enough, didn’t really fascinate me. Might have to read it again.

                  Your last book reminds me of “The Wizard and the Prophets”, which I haven’t read, but was paraphrased in the Freakanomics podcast episode “Two (Totally Opposite) Ways to Save the Planet (Ep. 346)”. Found it thought-provoking and irritating – but in a good way. Quote from the podcast description: “The environmentalists say we’re doomed if we don’t drastically reduce consumption. The technologists say that human ingenuity can solve just about any problem.”

                  1. 2

                    +1 for Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality. That and the concept of rationality from Yudkowsky changed the way how I look at the world.

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                      I put off reading harry potter and the methods of rationality when I first heard of it because of it being sold as fanfiction, but it might be my favorite book.

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                        Absolutely, I can’t recommend it enough!

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                      I read Neal Stephenson’s Anathem and loved it. Blew my mind. It did take a while to get going, though. But totally worth it.

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                        Anathem is really wonderful, I would suggest it too.

                      1. 3

                        Does anyone here use / love D? I’ve not taken the time to learn it, but from what I’ve seen it seems like I might enjoy it more than go but still less than Rust.

                        1. 2

                          I like it. Imho it is decent language with nice features.

                          1. 2

                            I really love it. I blogged about my attempt to really learn it in earnest:

                            http://jordi.inversethought.com/blog/advent-of-d/

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                            Support for loops in my toy programming language tinySelf.

                            I am kind of stuck on this one, because it is “bytecode and stack” programming language, and cycles are just messages to block (anonymous “lambda” object closure) repeated as long as the block is true or false.

                            [a = b] whileTrue: [do something]
                            

                            “Primitive” methods (implemented in “native code”) can’t get result of the block evaluation, and there is no support for jumps in bytecode (also I consider this quite inelegant). And implementation with recursion will eat up all stack without tail call optimization, which is something I want to avoid right now. So, I am not sure how to implement it. I am kind of inclined to use forth-like instruction stack, which will have precedence over bytecode-crunching-loop, so primitive would be able to put there instructions like “get result of the evaluation of this block, evaluate block with body and then call again this primitive”, but I did not yet decided whether this is what I want.

                            So, my weekend plans are to think about this, maybe draw few diagrams, or try few approaches and decide what suits me best.

                            Other than that, I would also like to do some writing, I have some stories and blogs which I would like to finish.

                            1. 1

                              Oh, interesting puzzle. Would it be hard to implement TCO? It seems like the right answer.

                              1. 3

                                Continue to crunch issues in my pet language tinySelf. I have to implement exceptions and exception handling.

                                  1. 1

                                    CherryTree

                                    +1 for CherryTree

                                  1. 7

                                    VS Code has way to much telemetry built in for my liking. Also, there’s pretty much no way to turn it off completely either.

                                    1. 8

                                      You shoud seriously look at the napoleon / google doc: https://sphinxcontrib-napoleon.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

                                      This is already implemented and supported standard.

                                      1. 3

                                        Yes indeed. For those unfamiliar, here are (from the link) examples of the two docstring styles that Napoleon (a Sphinx extension) parses and renders. PyCharm, too, parses Numpy and Google docstrings and uses the information for tooltips, static analysis, etc.

                                        Google style:

                                            """Summary line.
                                        
                                            Extended description of function.
                                        
                                            Args:
                                                arg1 (int): Description of arg1
                                                arg2 (str): Description of arg2
                                        
                                            Returns:
                                                bool: Description of return value
                                        
                                            """
                                            return True
                                        

                                        NumPy style:

                                            """Summary line.
                                        
                                            Extended description of function.
                                        
                                            Parameters
                                            ----------
                                            arg1 : int
                                                Description of arg1
                                            arg2 : str
                                                Description of arg2
                                        
                                            Returns
                                            -------
                                            bool
                                                Description of return value
                                        
                                            """
                                            return True
                                        
                                        1. 2

                                          Hmm, Google’s style + napoleon extension does seem quite good. I wonder if I should update my style guide. I suggested that you should just bite the bullet and use Sphinx style there due to the doc auto-gen benefits, but seems like this is best of both worlds.

                                          1. 2

                                            Nice style guide! Changing it to recommend Numpy and/or Google style over Sphinx style gets a big +1 from me, it’s what I myself teach students. We’re all data analysts/statisticians (‘data scientists’), so in our case we use Numpy style, which is also used by Scipy, Pandas, and Scikit-learn (and certainly others, too).

                                            1. 1

                                              I am using Google’s style for quite few years and I have to say, that I didn’t yet seen anything better. So yes from me.

                                        1. 3
                                          • Implement a project for the second part of the SpaceKnow interview process.
                                          • Continue putting together my own programming language (tinySelf).
                                          1. 4

                                            I dog-sat my brother’s 7 months old Australian Sheppard. Never again. Now that that’s done, kids’ swimming classes in half an hour, then we’re receiving friends this afternoon. I’d like to get some coding done tonight maybe. That our more LinkedIn Learning.

                                            Tomorrow, I can’t remember what’s up. Probably gonna read me some more Lovecraft. Maybe something more technical. Definitely some reading.

                                            1. 1

                                              I dog-sat my brother’s 7 months old Australian Sheppard. Never again.

                                              Hah. I walked this pretty boy yesterday. What problems did you had?

                                              1. 1

                                                I have two older rescue dogs, one of which has severe arthrosis of the elbows, preventing her from even fleeing a situation. The other one is much smaller and couldn’t just make the guest dog stop. So I had 48 hours of dog bickering to manage, because the guest dog is much younger and more playful. And did not get the cute that the other dogs wanted nothing to do with that.

                                                Full disclosure, I probably suck at dogs.

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                                                Considering harmful considered harmful.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Yes lol this was 100% tongue-in-cheek

                                                  1. 12

                                                    He didn’t really answer the question though :(

                                                    I think they’re CONSIDERED in opposition as a historical thing. While objects entered heavy use in the 80’s, the paradigm of “everything is an object” started with Java in the mid 90’s. Java rapidly became the most popular language, and functional languages started representing themselves as “not OOP”. Note that before the Java Era we had CLOS and Ocaml, both of which are functional languages with objects.

                                                    1. 5

                                                      You are right, he didn’t answer it! He answered “Is FP in opposition to OO”. I think your answer is pretty accurate. People confused C++ and Java as OOP (instead of recognizing them for what they were, Class Based Programming). And because these languages mutated state, FP is in opposition to them, and therefore OOP.

                                                      I think more importantly, the pop culture has no idea what OOP is and therefore people are confused when they think FP is in opposition to OOP.

                                                      1. 5

                                                        I think more importantly, the pop culture has no idea what OOP is and therefore people are confused when they think FP is in opposition to OOP.

                                                        I don’t think it’s fair to say that the “pop culture” doesn’t know what “OOP is”, because there really isn’t a definition of OOP. A lot of people equate it with Smalltalk, but you could also say OOP is Eiffel, or Ada, or Simula…

                                                        1. 3

                                                          People confused C++ and Java as OOP (instead of recognizing them for what they were, Class Based Programming).

                                                          I don’t really think that classes are problem*. They were not just Class Based Programming, but imperative Class Based Programming inspired by C. If you look at Smalltalk (which is also Class Based), missing component is late binding, which allows you to do all kinds of neat stuff and cleaner style of programming (imho).

                                                          *Although I really like Self, which is basically prototype based Smalltalk-like system.

                                                          1. 3

                                                            Unfortunately to most people class based programming and OOP are the same.

                                                            1. 5

                                                              I don’t know if “most” people do, but there is certainly a decent collection of people out there who think this. Consider this document (“Object-Oriented Programming in C”, revised December 2017), which starts out with this:

                                                              Object-oriented programming (OOP) is not the use of a particular language or a tool. It is rather a way of design based on the three fundamental design meta-patterns:

                                                              • Encapsulation – the ability to package data and functions together into classes
                                                              • Inheritance – the ability to define new classes based on existing classes in order to obtain reuse and code organization
                                                              • Polymorphism – the ability to substitute objects of matching interfaces for one another at run-time
                                                              1. 1

                                                                most people I have met while programming professionally in New Zealand.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Inheritance – the ability to define new classes based on existing classes in order to obtain reuse and code organization

                                                                  I think this is universally accepted as an anti-pattern, both by OO programmers and FP.

                                                                2. 2

                                                                  I think how most C++, Java, and .NET programmers code supports your position. At least, how most code I’ve seen works looking at code from… everywhere. Whatever my sample bias is, it’s not dependent on any one location. The bad thinking clearly spread along with the language and tools themselves.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              The slug in the URL here has somehow become notes-of-cpython-lists, when it should actually be notes-on-cpython-lists, not the of vs. on.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Actually decent article.