Threads for FIGBERT

  1. 4

    This is pretty neat. What I often want is the opposite of the “mini” mode here: give a command some data and it seeds the relevant torrent without worrying about downloads or ratios: just give the data out as fast as you can to whoever wants it.

    1. 2

      Interesting – if I understand correctly, the idea is that you would pass the location of the data on disk and the infohash to the client and it would proceed to just seed the torrent?

      I would note that if the intention is for direct file-sharing, there are probably better alternatives (like Magic Wormhole).

      1. 6

        Yes, that’s the idea. There are two reasons for this:

        1. To ensure the health of less popular torrents I care about or publish
        2. To saturate internet upstream already being paid for with data that helps torrents I care about rather than leaving it idle
        1. 1

          In the past I’ve done this by running aria2c in a systemd service unit.

    1. 6

      Beautiful work. Do I understand correctly that this is pure Go? This BT client would have pretty good safety properties correct? Would it also work with WebTorrent?

      1. 3

        Pure Go! And we do our best to ensure its security.

        We use anacrolix/torrent under the hood, which has support for WebTorrent.

        1. 5

          I’m intrigued. Totally anonymous providers are vanishingly rare. Even NearlyFreeSpeech.net doesn’t do anonymous.

          This was curious though, from https://njal.la/blog/opening/

          As long as you keep within the boundaries of reasonable law and you’re not a right-wing extremist, we’re for promoting your freedom of speech, your political weird thinking, your kinky forums and whatever. Even Trump is welcome.

          🤔. If you need anonymous hosting and aren’t a right wing extremist I guess it’s a good pitch. I think I’ll stick with https://www.nearlyfreespeech.net/about/faq#TheLongGame as my favorite principled though, where you can’t be anonymous but you can say whatever you want (as long as it’s legal).

          1. 2

            Seconded. Used it for a couple of years now. Simple, works well, and is privacy focused.

            1. 2

              Absolutely. I’ve used a good number of providers, and they’re by far the best in my experience.

            1. 3

              First of all, congratulations on the success! I’ve downloaded the game and am looking forward to trying it out – I’ve never played Othello before, but it seems quite fun.

              I’m working on a mobile game myself, so it’s always interesting to hear about how others are going about it. From a technical standpoint, the game you’ve made sounds quite impressive. Building your own Othello AI (in three languages, no less), maintaining that Apple design feeling, and getting it running across Apple platforms. Not an easy feat!

              1. 1

                This is bemusing me somewhat. I’m planning an in-place OS cloud VPS upgrade, don’t need zero-downtime, so I’m thinking I’ll stop it, take a snapshot, run the upgrade, and if it doesn’t work out how I plan, I can restore the snapshot. Seems a lot simpler, am I missing something obvious?

                1. 3

                  Sounds like a good plan to me

                  1. 1

                    Sounds a lot like my plan! I just made a whole bunch of mistakes.

                    1. 3

                      Oh, you should hear some of the mistakes I’m too embarrassed to tell you about …

                      1. 1

                        Oh, but no, you wiped your VPS. You had no place to restore it on a single click like with a snapshot.

                        A suggestion - you have all these fine things running as docker containers, why not trying to just raise them on your laptop? You don’t even need the docker daemon, just something like podman. Do that once a month or something to see if your backups are still good?

                    1. 6

                      You can attach strace to a process to see what it is doing. Grep for “open” to see what file it is at.

                      1. 4

                        Someone reached out to me via email to say the same thing! Got sent this article.

                        I was using bottom to monitor the entire system, but strace will definitely be a good tool to add to my kit.

                      1. 2

                        Your plan to have decent backups is good; your decision to have only three is baffling.

                        1. 1

                          I figure: what would I ever need to do with a fourth backup? Just seems paranoid. I’ll almost certainly always restore from the most recent anyways. Plus, I can always increase it in the future (and am open to changing it now, just can’t think of why I would).

                          1. 4

                            One real benefit to using tarsnap, specifically, is that tarsnap will deduplicate backed-up data across all backups. Deduplication doesn’t really help you if your server stores a rotating set of huge movies, but if you have a slowly-growing set of data, keeping old backups around is pretty much free.

                            1. 2

                              My backup scheme is:

                              • daily-01 to daily-31, these get overwritten as days progress.
                              • YYYY-MM, which never get overwritten.

                              The monthly snapshots are done on the first of every month.

                          1. 2

                            What’s the story with regards to delivery to major providers and self hosting email these days?

                            1. 3

                              I can’t speak for others, but I’ve been self hosting my email for a few months now, with no delivery problems whatsoever. Configuring the server to get messages to actually send and not end up in spam was difficult, but once it was done, things basically worked without issue.

                              1. 3

                                you don’t always know when mails you sent end up in the recipient’s spam folder.

                                1. 2

                                  Or when Gmail silently throws them away with no error or warning. Don’t even show in spam. Just <poof> and … gone.

                                2. 2

                                  I’ve had the same experience running Maddy on Hetzner.

                                  1. 1

                                    Considering how much of my life depends on a working email address and seeing all the horror stories of Gmail blocking accounts apparently for no good reason and with limited ability to appeal, I’m seriously considering hosting email myself too.

                                    Could you elaborate what were steps you needed to do for outgoing messages not to end up in the receiver’s spam folder?

                                    1. 2

                                      It mostly came down to properly setting up the DNS records for authentication. The Arch Wiki page for setting up a mail server is a very useful resource for this. For the most part, setting things up was just trial and error, troubleshooting until things worked. In my experience, hosting email actually isn’t that difficult. It’s definitely not easy, but if you know what you’re doing, it’s definitely doable, and it’s far from the hardest thing I’ve hosted in the past. Of course, this is just my experience, and obviously others have had experiences that differ a lot from mine, so definitely do your research before committing. Especially if you’re extremely dependent on having a working email address, it may be safer to either keep your current email, or just migrate it to a service other than Gmail if you feel uncomfortable with them.

                                      One other thing to note is that if you’re using a VPS, make sure your VPS provider actually allows you to self host email. Many VPS providers block crucial ports such as port 25. The process for getting these port(s) unblocked for your server differs from host to host; some don’t let you unblock it at all, for others you just have to open a support ticket and request it.

                                      1. 2

                                        Using some form of domain authentication is crucial. https://explained-from-first-principles.com/email/#domain-authentication

                                  1. 5

                                    Definitely understand the motivation behind the move, but I myself have always enjoyed programming native apps (regardless of platform and distribution method) over web tech. The experience of coding in SwiftUI is genuinely infinitely better than any web framework I’ve tried (React, Svelte, etc).

                                    1. 6

                                      Swift is a really nice elegant language, so I can appreciate what you’re saying, but man I really dislike XCode, and I REALLY dislike the fact that short of some work folks have done to make developing Swift server side apps on Linux etc possible you MUST code your apps on a Mac.

                                    1. 6

                                      Cryptojacking had potential, I believe. In some ways it is a good alternative to advertising – doesn’t track you, gives money to the creator, not distracting and such – but I can see why it bothers people. I think the main problem was the lack of consent (which is a problem in ads already, I never consented to receiving them), and the widespread adoption by hackers looking for a quick buck. I definitely could see a world where it went the other way, however, and became something people advocated for instead of becoming demonized.

                                      1. 5

                                        I recently set up Void Linux on a Lenovo laptop, and ran into some issues when I discovered that the device runs with Nvidia Optimus: it has two GPUs, one Intel and one Nvidia, the former being the default but less performant, and the latter being faster but also drawing more power.

                                        I quickly discovered that Nvidia are hostile to open source. The only open source driver available is nouveau, which is somewhat lacking and not endorsed by Nvidia, who IIRC provide their own proprietary driver which isn’t compatible with standard graphics APIs.

                                        Additional efforts to control how end-users use their own, purchased hardware is an attack on their customers who pay hunderds of dollar for their hardware.

                                        1. 4

                                          It seems a bit unfair to post this here after Drew was banned from this forum in my opinion.

                                          1. 4

                                            Why? Their blog posts are shared often enough here as it is, and authors rarely get right-of-reply here anyway.

                                            1. 2

                                              The blog posts aren’t going to be shared here anymore (the domain was banned too). I generally don’t think it would be appropriate to have a story on this site whose primary intent is to criticize someone who can’t respond.

                                              The point about authors not getting a right to reply is a fair one, but I’d counter that someone would generally extend an invitation to someone being criticized who wanted a chance to respond.

                                            2. 4

                                              Drew was banned? What happened?

                                              1. 6

                                                29 hours ago by pushcx: Please go be loudly disappointed in the entire world (and promote sourcehut) somewhere else.

                                                I didn’t know this either! I’m going to miss his commentary on a lot of topics (and not miss his commentary on others). @pushcx would you care to elaborate on this? He seemed to have a pretty positive score on a lot of his comments, even though I didn’t personally agree with many of his opinions. Quickly ctrl-f’ing his comment page, I can only see one comment with a score of 0.

                                                1. 7

                                                  When someone’s account is deleted (by themself or banning), their negative-score comments are deleted. There were a lot with @drewdevault over a long time.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Is there a particular reason his domain was banned? There’s plenty of cranky open source folks there with questionable use of language in their rants, and I don’t think he was any worse than, say, ESR.

                                                    1. 7

                                                      The reason for the domain ban is in the mod log:

                                                      Reason: I’m tired of merging hot takes, or cleaning up after the results of his trolling and sourcehut promotion.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Ouch. I had read the mod log earlier and was hoping for some clarification, but okay then.

                                            1. 14

                                              I’ve been really tempted to buy a remarkable2. But the reviews I see say it’s great for note taking but not so great for just reading PDFs. Mostly I want to read PDFs. I’m still on the fence.

                                              1. 14

                                                As long as your PDFs don’t require color, it is 100% worth it. Definitely one of my favorite devices at the moment.

                                                1. 5

                                                  Same. In the month or so I’ve had one, it hasn’t caused me a single frustration (and I’m the kind of person who gets annoyed at the user interfaces of my own Apple products). It works exactly as advertised. Anyone who thinks it might be worth the price tag should watch a third party review video and check out the official and awesome list projects. It has been awhile since I’ve stayed this excited about a new device so long after buying it.

                                                2. 12

                                                  I picked one up recently hoping that I could migrate a lot of my ebooks and pdfs to it. I don’t plan on returning it, but I wouldn’t recommend it.

                                                  I was a huge fan of the kindle dx, but I’ve managed to break the buttons on a couple which renders them practically useless. I was on the fence with the first remarkable device but figured I’d given the latest iteration a shot. I figured it’d be a good DX substitute. It’s not. I want to like it, the physical design is really good, but the software sucks.

                                                  I have a large collection of documents (epub/pdfs) that I was looking forward to getting on the device. Largely a mix of books published in electronic formats from regular publishers (O’Reilly, Manning, PragProg, etc.) as well as a few papers and docs I’ve picked up here and there.

                                                  First, the reMarkable desktop/mobile app that you have to rely on for syncing is a little wonky. Syncing between the device and mobile/desktop versions of the app works, but leaves a little to be desired. Second, I have yet to load a pdf or epub that isn’t brutally slow to navigate (just page by page). If the document has images or graphics (even simple charts and illustrations) it will affect navigation performance. Occasionally a document will load relatively quickly, and navigate reasonable well, only to slow down after a few page turns. Epubs tend to be a little more difficult to work with - particularly if you decide to change the font. All I have to compare this device to is my broken DX, which, everything considered, positively smokes the reMarkable.

                                                  It’s usable. It works alright for PDFs, less so for epubs. On the positive side, the battery life is quite good.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    I agree with your analysis in most regards. Syncing a lot of ebooks and pdfs to it is not something at which it would excel by default. I have a large Calibre library, and I haven’t synced it over for that reason. However, it’s something I’m looking forward to investigating with KOReader, which supports the reMarkable.

                                                    I haven’t experienced the lag that you talk about, but can understand that that would be bothersome – though I definitely have experienced the “wonkiness” of the companion apps.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      My understanding is that epubs are converted to PDF before being synced? Is that actually the case?

                                                      1. 4

                                                        It renders the epub to pdf for display but that’s all in-memory. It’s still an epub on disk.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I don’t know. I’ve got a couple books that are both pdf and ePub, and the pdf version behaves a little better. You can also resize and change fonts for ePub doc, but not for PDFs.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Along these lines, another interesting observation I’ve made has to do with the way some kinds of text get rendered. In particular, I’ve encountered epubs with code listings that render fine in other apps and on other devices, but render horribly on the remarkable2 device. Interestingly, in some of those cases I will also have a publisher provided PDF that renders just fine.

                                                            Further, epubs and PDFs are categorized differently in both the app and the device. With epubs you can change the justification, page margins, line spacing, fonts, and font size. With PDFs you have fewer options, but you do have the ability to adjust the view (which is great for papers since you can get rid of the margins).

                                                          2. 2

                                                            I don’t think so – from my playing around with ssh, there are definitely some epubs stored on device. I actually think the browser extension generates epubs, rather than pdfs which was surprising.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Huh. Cool. Hmmm. The real reason I shouldn’t get one is that I always fall asleep with my e-reader and it often bounces off my face.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                That’s a pro, for the device, it weighs next to nothing. I’ve damn near knocked myself out dropping an iPad Pro on my head when reading in bed.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  For me, it’s more the fact that the Kobo then ends up falling onto the floor. I’m not crazy with that with a $120 device, so …

                                                        2. 7

                                                          I own Gen 1 and Gen 2. I love the simplicity and focus of the device. It’s an amazing… whiteboard.

                                                          Note taking is not suuuper great. Turns out marking up a PDF to take notes actually isn’t that great because the notes quickly get lost in the PDF. It’s not like in real life, where you can put a sticky note to jump to that page. The writing experience is fantastic though. I have notebooks where I draw diagrams/ideas out. I like it for whiteboarding type stuff.

                                                          Reading is terrible. I mean, it works. Searching is painfully slow. The table of contents doesn’t always show up (even though my laptop PDF reader can read the TOC just fine). When you do get a TOC, the subsections are flattened to the top level, so it’s hard to skim the TOC. PDF links don’t work. Text is often tiny, though you can zoom in. EPUBs appear to get converted to PDFs on the fly and their EPUB to PDF conversion sucks. Though, I’ve found doing the conversion myself in Calibre is way better.

                                                          Overall, I like the device for whiteboarding. But it’s kinda hard to recommend.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            Marking up PDFs works better in color, since you can pick a contrasting ink color. I do it in Notability on my iPad Pro (which is also great for whiteboarding / sketching.)

                                                            I was tempted by reMarkable when the first version came out, but I couldn’t see spending that kind of money on something that only does note taking and reading. I’m glad it’s found an audience though, it’s a cool device.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Turns out marking up a PDF to take notes actually isn’t that great because the notes quickly get lost in the PDF. It’s not like in real life, where you can put a sticky note to jump to that page.

                                                              So far the best experience I’ve seen for this is LiquidText on an iPad Pro. While you can write on the PDF as any other annotator, there’s also a lot of more hypertext type of features, like collecting groups of notes in an index, or writing separate pages of notes that are bidirectionally hyperlinked to parts of the document they refer to. Or do things like pull out a figure from a paper into a sidebar where you attach notes to it.

                                                              The main downside for me is that you do more or less have to go all-on on LiquidText. It supports exporting a workspace to flat PDFs, but if you used the hypertext features in any significant way, the exported PDFs can be very confusing with the lack of expected context.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Agreed that it is hard to find notes. There should be a way to jump to pages that have notes on them (this is how Drawboard PDF works, for example).

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  What is the advantage over drawing on a piece of paper or on a whiteboard, then taking a photo of what you’ve drawn, if needed?

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I tried paper note books, but I’m too messy and make too many mistakes. Erasing, moving, and reordering is hard on paper.

                                                                    A whiteboard is pretty good for temporary stuff and erases better than paper. But, it can be a bit messy.

                                                                    I also tried Rocketbook for a while. I got the non-microwaveable (yes you read that right) one. That was okay. A little meh for me.

                                                                    And of course, you can’t read PDFs on any of these.

                                                              1. 5

                                                                I’ve taken a slightly different tact, how can I take notes and share them as a typed document the fastest?

                                                                • A paper notepad with a pen/pencil, and a mobile phone with a scanning function.
                                                                • Eink tablet e.g. remarkable
                                                                • Color tablet e.g. apple ipad

                                                                The paper notepad option has been by FAR the most successful, after trying all of them. Especially recently with coronavirus wfh options at my work, I’ve been taking hand written notes during meetings. I save them and share them through a google doc for work. It takes seconds to go from written note -> email’d text using the google drive scanning function on my phone. The writing experience is incredible (because it’s writing)

                                                                The Eink tablet I just spent time fiddling with it, openning the “right” template, getting the cloud syncing working the way I like, re-uploading to google drive for sharing (which now I need to open the phone app anyways to do?), then again transcription to a document. The writing experience was very good, though I don’t like how slow eink is for flipping between pages of notes.

                                                                The color tablet was a complete shit show, even though it had the most superior software. While flipping pages etc was faster, the writing experience was so bad I almost never used it.

                                                                Only caveat of the eink tablet - annotating someone else’s typed paper is much better as the root document isn’t part of your scanned notes. This is actually very rare for me as all collaboration on documents occurs within google docs for work, so the hand written notes need to be re-transcribed if I go this route.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I definitely agree with the color tablet analysis. From my brief usage of an iPad as a note taking device, it was absolutely terrible – nothing like writing by hand.

                                                                  I spent the first half of this school year taking notes by hand and then scanning them (and then the reMarkable arrived), so I’m not a stranger to the workflow. It seems like you do a lot of work in Google’s suite, so our workflow differs there – I mostly just write and submit, which the rM is quite good at, rather than working collaboratively.

                                                                  Ultimately, it’s whatever works best for you – I’ve definitely thought about getting one of the Evernote books that has enhanced scanning, but I’m definitely going to be a reMarkable guy for the foreseeable future.

                                                                1. 6

                                                                  I’m really intrigued by these devices. I’ve heard a lot of good things about them, but the thing that’s putting me off is that you seem to have to use their cloud service to sync PDFs and notes, and the hand-written stuff seems to use a proprietary format.

                                                                  There’s also a reviewer on YouTube called “My Deep Guide” who loves the rM2 but he has some valid criticisms of the software not being as good as the hardware, especially compared to competitors.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    I’ve refused to connect my device to their cloud and have had no problem - it is a bit unfortunate that this means losing the handwriting recognition, but everything else I care about works just fine.

                                                                    You can sync files over usb, the remarkable pretends to be a network adapter and serves a webpage on 10.11.99.1 which you can drag files onto/off of. I’ve also sshed into the device and created a script to back it up with restic (just a normal piece of backup software, not remarkable specific) ;)

                                                                    The hand written notes format is proprietary, but it’s simple and has been reverse engineered. It’s not hard to export the notes to another format.

                                                                    I’d generally recommend it, as long as you understand it as “paper + pdfs printed onto paper + bare bones linux” and not anything more.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      This section is titled “jailbreak,” which is actually a bit of misnomer because the reMarkable runs Linux and you can ssh into it with ease.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        I’m not sure how that really makes it a more usable device. Instead of being able to plug it in with a USB cable and sync files as a removable drive, I have to put it on the network and use a non-standard feature?

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          You can plug in a USB cable, it just shows up as a network interface instead of as a storage device. It’s probably not the most usable option, but it does make it easier to see and interact with the device as a computer instead of as a fancy flash drive.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            When you connect a reMarkable to your computer via USB, the computer sees a USB network adapter. Then use DHCP or set an IP manually for that adapter. Usually the reMarkable will use 10.11.99.1 for itself and 10.11.99.2 for “your side”.

                                                                            So even when you use USB, you can ssh into it.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              I would check out the Awesome list, specifically the APIs and Cloud Tools sections. I also use scp fairly often to just grab the files directly, or even export them using the app.

                                                                              I’ll check out “My Deep Guide,” I haven’t really read many reviews of the device myself. I’m also not really aware of any competitors?

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Consider mosh, screen, or tmux. Double for tmux if the remote side runs OpenBSD since I believe it’s in the default install. Also double for tmux when the local side runs Mac OS and you use iTerm as your terminal emulator. On Mac OS use tmux’s -CC option which hides the tmux ‘in-band trigger’ issue transparently for you.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            My understanding of the article and the sleuthing the author did is that neither mosh, nor screen, nor tmux would help. He’s copying large files, and the problem was that misconfigured carrier grade NAT was killing the SSH connection before the official TCP timeout.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              I am by no means an expert on this, but I think that though screen and tmux would both be ineffective mosh might solve the issue. The former are terminal multiplexers, meant to manage and resume sessions – so not fixing the problem.

                                                                              Mosh, however, is a different protocol that ditches TCP altogether in favor of UDP and thus AFAIK will not be affected by the timeout.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                I’m not sure you could do file copies over mosh, even like the author did using netcat.

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            Hetzner is quite cool although if you’re running Docker containers over there, you gotta be careful. Unlike other cloud providers, Hetzner offers no “Firewall” product (like AWS Security Groups,Digital Ocean Firewall etc). The only way to restrict incoming traffic is by yourself using iptables/ufw etc.

                                                                            Surprisingly Docker and UFW don’t play nicely together as demonstrated here. I’d like to make a move to Hetzner myself from DO but because of this limitation, I’m unable to. I know there are workarounds and hacks, but fiddling with iptables rules for protecting sensitive information is not something I’m willing to do.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              It looks like they added a Load Balancer since then so that information might be out of date. (source: https://www.hetzner.com/cloud )

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                They seem to be building features, which is nice. First just vms. Then volumes, networks, floating ips, load balancers. I wonder if object storage is next?

                                                                              2. 4

                                                                                I’ve been bitten by this. I felt pretty stupid afterwards.

                                                                                My feeling is that docker is to blame here, after a lot of years, still not working with a widely deployed firewall, bypassing it if it’s enabled, and not supporting nftables at all? And not to mention the cgroups v2 issue.

                                                                                Yet I’m still using it. I should have moved to using podman or such…

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  I felt pretty stupid afterwards.

                                                                                  Same. Luckily I had just workloads with non critical data. I spent the following week moving back to DigitalOcean.

                                                                                  should have moved to using podman or such…

                                                                                  Does Podman respects UFW rules? How do they do networking stuff differently than Docker? Would be pretty interested to explore more on this.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Does Podman respects UFW rules? How do they do networking stuff differently than Docker? Would be pretty interested to explore more on this.

                                                                                    As far as I’ve understood it, podman doesn’t touch your networking at all. You have to set it up yourself, but I probably have misunderstood something in this area.

                                                                                    I’m still (happily) using Hetzner, but I should really move to something else than debian/docker as this is still broken.

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      Late comment - podman works just like plain old Docker, setting up network and all. Played around a bit with it using ansible on a brand new cpx11 on Hetzner, it’s so much faster than my old machines at home, hard to go back to after tasting that speed. Oh well.

                                                                                2. 1

                                                                                  I’m currently running a bunch of Docker stuff on my DigitalOcean VPS, and have been relying on ufw for my firewall needs… Going to look into this right now, thanks for the heads up!

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    If you have machines on Hetzner’s Robot (the bare metal offering) then you have a firewall option

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Yep, but like the author in the post said, one of the reasons to move was Cost. I doubt I’d want to pay 50% extra (yes for better resources) just to get Firewall. I think it’s a basic security feature that they should have offered in their core offering for a VPS too, but then again it gave me a chance to experiment with FreeBSD so not complaining much :)

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        Hmm, … a used 32G machine on Hetzner costs as much as a 32G VPS and has double the disk space (on RAID-0). And you can get 64G machines on robot (not on cloud). There are use cases where their cloud offering is better and others where their bare metal is best. I’ve run hybrid workloads there with great joy.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I love spotifyd, but I can’t make it work for my use case because it doesn’t fully support the MPRIS standard. It doesn’t emit the correct signals when changing properties (track changed, position changed, etc).

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Seems like they’re working on it. Hope this gets fixed/implemented soon, though it’s not that big a deal for me as I’m not utilizing this in my specific setup.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        Thanx for pointing me to the ticket. I remember looking at the Rust MPRIS library and giving up to come up with a working solution. :(

                                                                                        My use case is that I capture the track changed event with a small user daemon which then submits the data to last.fm, libre.fm or audioscrobbler.

                                                                                        For a while I circumvented this problem by using the SpotPRIS2 project, which creates MPRIS devices for all your Spotify devices, and reads the data using Spotify’s API. It gives better info than the official linux client, but it crashes a lot, so in the long term not worth it, sadly.

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      What I’m waiting for is the release of API for adding custom controls there, it would be far more better than current statusbar soup where menu and status icons fight for space.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        Yeah, I’ve noticed status bar icons on macOS Big Sur take up a disproportionate amount of space… Still trying to figure out how to optimize the space.