Threads for God

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    I’ll try to work on my site. I want to have one, I’ve even tried many times, but it rarely got past the half-done phase. I want to change it.

    I have a million other things and priorities, personally and at work, so this might fail, again. That’s why I’m posting it, to “commit myself”, to tell myself that I actually am doing it this time.

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      Wanna elaborate on what you are using to create your website?

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        Well, I use wintersmith as mentioned. For me, this part is yet irrelevant, though. I first want to figure out what to put there, content-wise. Like, I know I want an about page and a now page.

        I also want a sort of a microblog - just for regular posts and smaller, random thoughts - and a deep-dive subsection, where I explore concepts (sorta like long-post multi-part blogs). And a photo gallery to upload some of my photos. A back-to-the-roots, own-your-data, indieweb sort of thing.

        So where do I start with all of that? How to make a “hello world, my online now lives here” appearance? How do I start adding content? When do I finally say “hey people I wrote something, take a look”? You know, not to end up like one of those blogs with 2 articles, a “hello world” and the “first in the series” that then die off.

        I think I basically want to work out my sitemap this week.

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        Are you crafting it by hand or using something like Wordpress or Hugo?

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          wintersmith. It’s similar, just JavaScript, as JavaScript is my hammer.

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        Regular work. I also enrolled in an online course on Artificial Intelligence in edX just to refresh my knowledge. So, I’ll try to go through the course materials after work and hopefully make a good progress this week.

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          Taking 3 days off this work week using my Use-Or-Lose vacation days for the year. Will spend time with GF and also try some problems from hackerrank or leetcode.

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            I paid off all of my loans and have some savings for emergency. So, I’m going to look into investing in some stocks. I am a total newbie when it comes to investment. So, I don’t want to start it without knowing what I am getting into.

            On technical side, I am going to try Google’s Sentiment Analysis APIs for one of my private projects.

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              I work in finance, and most people who actively manage portfolios buy passive stuff (like ETFs or low-fee funds) for themselves with their “important” money.

              With then some amount of play money they often invest in the latest fad like cannabis stocks or some other bullshit, and they usually lose as much as they gain on average.

              Point is, keep it boring, with fees <70 basis points if you just want to leave your money alone for a decade or two. Don’t stock pick unless you would be willing drop the same amount on blackjack or poker.

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                Robo-advisors (like Schwab or Betterment) offer a compelling solution, investing your moneys in index funds (passive stuff), rebalancing automatically and in certain situations, ‘tax-harvesting’ on losses.

                Still not an excuse to not understand what’s going on, but reduces labor (and potential mistakes).

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                  My problem with robo advisors for taxable investment accounts is that they have a certain amount of lock in - transferring shares out in kind creates a mess that’s fairly difficult to manage by hand. TLH/rebalancing is also quite easy to do manually once or twice a year on a small ETF or mutual fund portfolio.

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                  I like the idea of keeping it boring. Like I said, I am really new to investment. So, stocks might not be the only options I want to pursue. Also, I am not making a lot of money right now but I though it would be a good idea to do some study when I have time. Thanks for you suggestions.

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                    One piece of advice that got my attention was to contribute to your employer 401k program - specifically contribute as much as your employer would match. That way you know you’re getting a 100% return on that money, which is basically unmatched anywhere else. The catch is that contributing more than what your employer matches actually brings that % return down.

                    The idea that marginal returns are what matters was particularly powerful to me - basically paying down your credit card debt at 18% interest rate is equivalent to investing in a stock with 18% return. So unless you can guarantee that you can get an 18%+ return on your investment, you may as well just “invest” in paying off your credit card.

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                      I am contributing to my 401k as much as my employer matches right now. I plan to increase my contribution in future though.

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                  Some books I recommend

                  I agree with the no stock picking / buy an index advice even though these are about stock picking :) I’ve heard Mastering the Market Cycle book is a good introduction to investing.

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                    Congratulations!

                    This is a ~16 page book that I recommend for new investors. It packs a bunch of useful advice in a very short volume: https://www.etf.com/docs/IfYouCan.pdf

                    Past that, the Boglegeads wiki and forum has a wealth of information and people who can help if you want to learn more or ask about your specific situation.

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                      As a novice myself I found A Random Walk Down Wall Street refreshing.

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                        Thanks for the recommendation. I will definitely check it out.

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                        Good work getting to debt free!

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                          Thanks. I did not have huge debt. It was mostly student loan and my car installment. Still, it was a huge relief.

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                          Congrats on paying off your loans! One piece of advice (among the hundreds of unsolicited pieces of advice you’ll get when talking about investment online) is to only buy risky¹ investments with money that you don’t need to survive with. If you imagine that pile of money disappearing, would you still be able to pay for food, rent, and other daily expenses? It’s also prudent to plan for the occasional emergency expense such as last-minute travel for a funeral. You obviously can’t plan for everything (nor should you), but you don’t want to be put in a position where you have to sell stocks at a loss to pay for a plane ticket.

                          ¹ “risky” in this context means anything that only makes sense as a long-term multi-year investment, such as stocks

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                            Congrats on paying off all your loans!

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                              On the off-chance that you end up looking at peer-to-peer investment sites like LendingClub and Prosper, be aware that your money stays locked up for years in those loans. With LendingClub you may be able to sell some of your loan investments on a third party site (FolioFN) but Prosper does not have this. You won’t be able to get your money out easily (or at all) if you need it - you’ll get it back (hopefully with a profit) in a trickle as loans are (hopefully) repaid. I see these platforms now as essentially a medium term bet on economic stability, and I am personally not a sophisticated enough investor (or maybe I’m just too risk averse) to make that bet. I’m gradually withdrawing my investments as they’re repaid (that’s not intended as investment advice 😀)

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                              Looks different in different browsers but great work !

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                                My company is switching to Kotlin for new code and services, so I might take a look at it.

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                                  What were you using before?

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                                    I would bet Java.