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    Adding the shoulder buttons to my Clockwork Pi Gameshell. Can’t say enough good things about this little sucker. Quality engineering all the way down. It comes in modular components that you assemble. What’s impressive about that is that the skill level required is exactly zero. Each board has a little case/box it slides into, you slide the boxes into the handheld shell/case, and wire them together with beautifully labeled cables. The assembly instructions are very good and there’s a companion Youtube video in case you need to actually see it being put together.

    The launcher is currently written in Python, but is being rewritten in Go, and it’s all open source.

    I also plan to run through the PICO-8 tutorials. I haven’t had this much fun programming since the Atari 800 :) Everything - graphics, sprites, sounds et al is accessible from the interactive command prompt, and all the tools you need (sprite editor, sound effects editor, sequencer, map editor, code editor) come built in.

    It’s like geek escapist heaven :)

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      I totally recommend checking out TIC-80 too if you like PICO-8. It is exciting to have a variety of fantasy consoles to play with. :)

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        tic-80 is awesome and also has the advantage of being 100% open source, but there are display problems on the clockwork pi and I’m kinda fixated on that as my target platform these days :)

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        Darn it, now I really want one of those….

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          Yeah. Definitely having fun. Also just discovered that it runs VNC perfectly so I can use it paired with a tablet as an ultra mobile Linux dev platform with X applications support!

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            Cannnnnn it emulate a PlayStation 1 effectively? I am looking for an excuse to go back to Final Fantasy Tactics…

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              Runs PSX Rearmed like a champ

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        Is there a list of all of the Lobste.rs sibling communities?

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          Yep: https://github.com/lobsters/lobsters/wiki

          (There are likely more we’re unaware of; they’re under no obligation to tell us they exist.)

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            Thank you! very cool to see lobsters being used more!

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              It’s just such an ingenious piece of code – I’m sure it will end up being used across the whole spectrum of subjects!

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          I have had a lot of success with elm without webpack. Is that just for reloading, or does it help with something else?

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            Webpack tends to work a lot better if you have multiple Elm pages i.e multiple entry points. I’m the co-author of the webpack plugin, and also worked on sprockets plugin. I’ve been in charge of managing the sprockets -> webpack shift at NRI, and we’ve seen some considerable speed gains thanks to moving to webpack, both in developement and on deploy. This is because the node-elm-compiler has a bunch of benefit, including but not limited to: 1) better change detection in deps, 2) the use of a tmp file in order to avoid long IO, 3) a more intelligent way of looking up things to build (i.e using a webpack entry point rather than sprockets crawling through all the pages).

            There’s nothing wrong with using sprockets or any other approach. I’ve seen lots of people use other approaches such as a manual build system using gulp. Use whatever works for you. If your existing tools are webpack based or speed might be an issue, then you might be better off using webpack. That isn’t a one-fits-all case though, webpack can be slower with Elm depending on your set up.

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            I am curious what projects being rewritten in Rust would have the biggest payoff. Rewriting everything is interesting, but my intuition is that some projects would benefit more.