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    I use OpenCamera as my go-to camera app on my phone. It’s really quite good, and I can recommend it.

    The only thing it’s missing is a QR reader.

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      How is a barcode scanner a “missing feature” of a camera application?

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        It’s useful. iPhones have great QR code scanning right in the camera. Who wants to dig through their installed apps just to scan a QR code? That’s one of the reasons QR codes never gained traction.

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          Side note: QR codes are extremely popular in Asia.

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      For those that still believe in RSS, and are looking for a nice client, I suggest… your email client

      I built Feenbox a few years ago in between jobs but never got to releasing it. It’s kinda slow, started as a multiuser layer on top of rss2email but now it has its own codebase.

      I’ve been using it in production along with a few friends without a hiccup on a very cheap machine on Digitalocean. I still hope to release it someday with a quick stripe integration for a couple bucks a month, just to pay the machine and make some beer money.

      Anyway, if you want an invite let me know. It’s free right now and will continue like this until the day I launch the service, which may be never.

      Please don’t post it on HN or Reddit, I can’t manage more than 5-10 new users as I’m super busy at my current job, the system doesn’t scale yet, and I’m not ready to receive payments due to taxes, GDPR etc. Feedback will be welcome – though keep in mind it’s a simple solution to my own itch.

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        I too think that email clients make a wonderful RSS reader. In the case of Thunderbird, it supports RSS natively as I mentioned in another comment

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          As does MS Outlook (if you are a Windows user)

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            I didn’t knew that, thanks for sharing.

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          Personally, I consume news feeds quite different from e-mail, so something like that does not work for me. I’m an elfeed user and make heavy use of its tagging feature so I can manage dozens of feeds by now, using the tags to show those entries that belong to what I am currently at. I’ve never been so happy with feed reading before.

          I’d actually need the inverse from rss2email: an email2rss gateway. There are websites that don’t provide an RSS/Atom feed, but only an e-mail newsletter. That conflicts with my way to consume news. Is something like that available?

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            Interesting. I built something similar for personal use (using offlineimap and a scraper).

            Does Feenbox do anything to handle partial feeds (that is, feeds that truncate articles, making you go to the site to get the rest of the content)?

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              No, it provides the feed content as-is (plus attachments), but that’s a great feature request!

              However, I’m not sure how to solve that. Compare the CDATA content against the guid url page content? That would require an extra HTTP request plus post-processing per feed item, which is not super bad, but extra overhead nonetheless

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                I ended up storing a CSS selector alongside the feed URL.

                If a feed item has a valid URL, I extract everything matching the selector from that URL to replace the CDATA content. If nothing matches or the HTTP fetch fails, I mark it as un-processed and try again later (at some point it’d be good to eventually give up and send the original, but for my purposes this is alright for now).

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            I feel like I’ve read a thousand developer blogs that say the same thing. “RSS was good, we should use it, here are some resources”. I agree, but what’s there to actually do? Most blogs do still natively support RSS if they use any popular blogging framework.

            Podcasts are a platform that use RSS almost exclusively and they’re going strong - there are tons of high quality well-funded podcasts. Apple and Google continue to attempt to hijack the platform with something proprietary but RSS goes strong.

            So, what’s the point of this writeup? RSS exists, is good, and is in use. It’s also old and so unremarkable now that we take it for granted.

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              I think the aim here is to educate the masses that there is a better way to consume their favourite websites. We should be evangelists and tell everyone we meet about how to setup an RSS client on their PC/Mac or phone (well not quite, but you get the idea).

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                Most blogs do still natively support RSS if they use any popular blogging framework.

                Its use among content authors is deceasing. A number of websites I would like to syndicate don’t have RSS feeds. Examples include the Hamburg data protection authority’s website, my university faculty’s website, and, which I regret most, the European Commision’s website. All three of them publish news apart from their website only through social media. They are examples of why we need to keep Atom/RSS in mind of content authors.

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                Writing Web Portals to manage user identities for a very large organisation in the UK. Writing web stuff 100% not my ‘day job’ but needs to be done, and there’s no-one else to do it…

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                  I got caught by this once. I was writing a Shop Website, and added a clickable banner image at the top which I called ‘promotion-name-advert.jpg’ . A couple of months later I noticed that it had almost zero clicks, only by browsing on my production machine, did I realise that my adblocker extension blocks any image with the word ‘advert’ in the name by default.

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                    Last picture is of a Cray (YMP?) Lovely looking machines. I’ve had the pleasure of being up close and personal with one whilst it was in use (i.e. not in a museum).

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                      begin rant

                      I have never used Windows as my primary operating system but I thought with WSL I could consider it. I have a burner laptop I use for when I absolutely have to run Windows (usually work related).

                      Windows 10 is awful. The amount of bloatware is incredible. Alerts popping up to tell me to subscribe to OneDrive. A ton of XBox crap I won’t ever use and can’t uninstall. Ads in the start menu.

                      And it’s unusably slow. The little burner laptop isn’t particularly fast, but it’s name-brand (HP) and all that jazz…and resizing windows or right-clicking to open a menu can take tens of seconds. I figured out it’s due to the Windows Defender antivirus scanning; disabling that makes it barely usable but I’m surprised that it’s that bad. Supposedly it only runs when the box is idle, but I think what they consider “idle” is wrong. (It would happen when I was videoconferencing, which definitely isn’t “idle”, and tax the system to the point that I’d lose connectivity.)

                      Then you have the weird split between Metro and Classic apps. Why are some things in the Settings app, and other things in the Control Panel?

                      I remember, years ago, when Windows seemed to be “put together well”…now it seems really Frankensteiny.

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                        Yes it’s amazing how much they messed up the config screens with Windows 8 and many years later they still haven’t fixed it. They need to make up their mind, either move all the functionality to their pretty new screens, or move it all back to the old style config panel, but as it is it’s incredibly confusing to find under which screen is which config item.

                        I was using Windows 7 on an old laptop the other day - everything is nice, clean and logical. I don’t get how they could mess everything up so badly with Windows 8.

                        1. 1

                          I agree that Windows can be pretty crummy out of the box, especially if the OEM adds a layer of crud. If you find that you need to use Windows more often, it’s not too painful to get a clean install and remove a lot of that annoying stuff.

                          1. 1

                            That’s unsurprising. With every Windows, I had to go through a first step in disabling all kinds of bad stuff and installing good stuff (i.e. Microsoft alternatives). Then, Windows was a great platform to use. Even Windows Vista minus its RAM usage. It sounds like you didn’t do the initial, cleanup step that’s pretty much mandatory for a positive experience with Windows.

                            I’m not going to encourage that since I think it’s a waste of your time given you’re rarely on Windows. ;) I am mentioning it as a reminder for anyone reading that thinking it’s inevitable or even you if you ever want to see how good you can make it just in curiosity. I’m sure there’s piles of guides on Internet to assist given how resourceful Microsoft forces people to get.

                            EDIT: Windows 7 Professional was the last, great Windows. I’d buy it today if they resold it under a perpetual, per-machine license with security or other fixes. They can basically charge us each year for the fixes. Make everything optional like with Windows Embedded. We could easily turn off what we don’t want. I’d be a happy camper.

                            1. 1

                              There’s an easy way to remove almost all of the bloatware, search google for ‘powershell script remove appx’

                              A good guide is here: https://www.askvg.com/guide-how-to-remove-all-built-in-apps-in-windows-10/

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                              I may be one of the few people who actually uses Windows: screenshot. That said, most of my time is spent in the WSL (using wsl-terminal, the best of a ho-hum bunch of terminal emulators on Windows) and Firefox. The battlestation is a Thinkpad T25.

                              My FreeBSD server is used for most other things, accessed through PuTTY. Most everything is done in Emacs, with tmux and zsh. And yes, Emacs is used entirely in a terminal (emacs -nw forever!). The font in the terminals is Iosevka.

                              And if anyone is wondering, the apps on the Taskbar are: Firefox, wsl-terminal, Directory Opus (worth it!), PuTTY, PDF-XChange Editor, Snipping Tool, and Task Manager.

                              1. 2

                                I am also a Windows user, Here’s my Desktop.

                                Can’t show any coding windows, as what I work on is classified. The application menu and to-do list apps are self-written. I never use the actual start menu for anything…. one day I’ll write a complete shell replacement…

                                1. 2

                                  Have you tried sharex for screenshots? It’s the one thing I miss from the windows world.

                                  1. 2

                                    Great recommendation. Thanks!

                                  2. 1

                                    My new personal laptop has poor Linux support for the time being, so I am currently relegated to WSL as well.

                                    I’ve created a way to launch X11 applications from Windows shortcuts, and I am using Terminator and Emacs this way. If you’re looking for a better terminal emulator, I could clean up my scripts and document them. They rely on an X11 server running on Windows, and I’ve been using VcXsrv for that purpose.

                                    1. 1

                                      I did this (use an X server) for a while but I found it to be laggy, notably with keyboard input. I was running urxvt in Xming (started from a shortcut) until recently. I tried wsl-terminal and found it to be acceptable. (Side note: it’s almost stunning how poor the terminal emulators on Windows are.)

                                      1. 1

                                        Totally agreed. For the WSL ones at least I think the big problem is that they’re the bog standard Windows Console (a-la CMD.EXE :) underneath.

                                  1. 1

                                    Is it possible to re-implement the Sync APIs [1], and build your own monolitic based Account Server instead?

                                    [1] https://mozilla-services.readthedocs.io/en/latest/

                                    1. 1

                                      The answer to “is it possible” is almost certainly “yes”, but whether it’s feasible is a different story. If, for example, the API docs are vague or incorrect, then you may be signing up for a great deal of reverse-engineering work. If the API docs lag behind an implementation change required for a new browser feature, you may be stuck playing catch-up.

                                      Then you have to deal with the fact that it’s a pretty darn niche product with a fairly small pool of potential open-source contributors.

                                      All that said, I think it’s a worthwhile thing to do.

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                                      I love it. It’s like Terminus with significantly better curly braces.

                                      Also, you have slashed zeroes, which is what all correct-thinking people prefer.

                                      1. 2

                                        Also, you have slashed zeroes, which is what all correct-thinking people prefer.

                                        I use a copy of Droid Sans Mono that I edited to have slashed-zeros. I love the font, but without slashed zeros (or even dot-zeros) it’s useless for coding.

                                        Terminus doesn’t render properly on Windows, which is a shame, As Spleen is a bitmap font, I’m guessing I need .fon versions for Windows ?

                                        1. 4

                                          For those that can’t (or don’t want to) edit fonts cosmix.org have a Droid Sans Mono with both dotted and slashed zero varieties.

                                          Arch users can get it from the AUR

                                          Powerline version too

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                                            Yes, I think .fon is the required format for bitmap fonts on Windows. I’ve generated some .fon files for all sizes here, but I don’t have access to any Windows machine, so I cannot test them. It would be nice if you could try and report results, thanks!

                                            1. 1

                                              Ok I’ve had a go. They don’t render in Windows at all. :( Windows just shows ‘Courier New’ when I preview the files. Looking via HEX viewer, it seems that your .fon files are missing extra (repeated) meta-data that Windows seem to need. Thanks tho!

                                        1. 1

                                          For Work:

                                          • Designing and testing Identity Management Reporting Functionality using Microsoft Identity Manager and System Center Service Manager Data Warehousing (phew!).
                                          • Writing a Web Portal so users can update their own details in the Active Directory

                                          For Personal:

                                          • Building a Raspberry Pi Infrared Red relay box so I can control my PS4 with a normal IR remote (Netflix via a PS4 controller sucks). Also plan to add commands to control Hue lights etc.
                                          • Fixing my sunset-to-midnight Huescript for my outside Hue lights as it’s stopped working.
                                          • Doing some more coding on my personal website backend - http://www.Jaruzel.com
                                          1. 2

                                            You might want to resize those images - you are using full size 4048x3036 images as thumbnails (which aren’t clickable anyway).

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                                              • Moving all my boxes of technical ‘bits’ from my Garage into my nice shiny new Shed/Workshop
                                              • Checking that the 1GB powerline connectors work across the new wiring from my house to my Shed/Workshop
                                              • …and if so, installing a spare NAS in there as an ‘off site’ backup platform, plus a WiFi AP so I can have a laptop in there as well.
                                              1. 4

                                                Although nice to watch, I would argue that that it’s only the display part that’s at 300 baud, not the actual surfing. He’s logging into a remote Debian shell, and surfing from there.

                                                1. 4

                                                  You are right to point out this detail. To fully clarify:

                                                  • The VT-100, being a terminal, is remotely controlling a Linux machine using the acoustic coupler at 300 bauds;
                                                  • The remote machine does surf using a much faster and modern connection.
                                                1. 4

                                                  Hopefully they only hide www. when it is exactly at the start of the domain name, leaving duplicates and domains in the middle (like notriddle.www.github.io and www.www.lobste.rs) alone.

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                                                    How about just leaving the whole thing alone? URI/URLs are external identifiers. You don’t change someone’s name because it’s confusing. Such an arrogant move from google.

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                                                      Because we’re Google. We don’t have to care know better than you.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        Eventually the URL bar will be so confusing and arbitrary users will just have to search google for everything.

                                                        1. 5

                                                          Which is of course, Google’s plan and intent, all along. Wouldn’t surprise me if they are aiming to remove URLs from the omni bar completely at some point.

                                                      2. 3

                                                        It’s the same with Safari on Mac - not only do they hide the subdomain but everything else from the URL root onwards too. Dreadful, and the single worst (/only really bad) thing about Safari’s UI.

                                                        1. 3

                                                          You don’t change someone’s name because it’s confusing

                                                          That’s why they’re going to try to make it a standard.
                                                          They will probably also want to limit the ports that you can use with the www subdomain, or at least propose that some be hidden, like 8080

                                                          1. 2

                                                            Perhaps everyone should now move to w3.* or web.* names just to push back! Serious suggestion.

                                                          2. 1

                                                            Indeed, but I still think it is completely unnecessary and I don’t get how this “simplifies” anything