1. 3

    @JordiGH: Since this link is not working and you probably won’t link the youtube one, I recommend linking at least to this one: https://video.fosdem.org/2018/

    1. 1

      Hm, it was working when I posted it. Now this seems to work?

      https://video.tedomum.net/videos/search?search=fosdem18

      1. 1

        yes, working again :) There was a double post because it wasn’t yesterday.

    1. 1

      Last I looked into this topic I found the situation of available Life cycle inventory datasets quite sad.

      A lot of research and life cycle assessment studies depend on these databases. Most datasets are being produced by private companies tailored to specific proprietary tools (such as Gabi) which researchers then use for modelling their subject of interest. There are some public datasets but they are considered incomplete by life cycle assessment profesionals I have talked to.

      Setting aside the issue that most software used in this research domain is proprietary, the licence terms of these data sets are very obnoxious. The terms of use are very narrowly restricted. And these data sets are very expensive, especially if they come with some seal of approval of some (self-appointed?) authority in the field. This data is being treated like trade secrets in many respects, even though it is essential for public research about our climate.

      Granted, it takes a lot of effort and expertise to compile and maintain accurate LCI databases. But this problem seems like a great fit for a community project which provides a platform for researches and other experts to share and accumulate data they have gathered, in a wikipedia-like fashion, free for everyone to use for any purpose.

      What is your view on this?

      1. 2

        Yes, the secrecy of scientific data is a huge problem. Even paying for the data, there can be problems with providers about the usage conditions of that data.

        I don’t know what to say. People who painstakingly compiled the data don’t seem to know how to profit off it except by restricting access to the data. I believe perhaps there should be more government initiatives to collect and free the data. That’s not an easy thing to do either, though.

      1. 10

        If maintaining a popular free and open source software project is producing stress… don’t do it!

        Really, just stop. Maintaining it, I mean. Unless you have contractual obligations or it’s a job or something, just tune it all out. Who cares if people have problems. Help if you can, help if it makes you happy, and if it doesn’t, it’s not your problem and just walk away. It’s not worth your unhappiness. If you can, put a big flag that says “I’m not maintaining this, feel free to fork!” and maybe someone else will take it over, but if they don’t, that’s fine too. It’s also fine if you don’t put a flag! No skin off your nose! You don’t owe anything to anyone!

        Now I’m gonna grump even more.

        I think this wave of blog posts about how to avoid “open source burnout” and so forth might be more of a Github phenomenon. The barrier to entry has been set to too low. Back in the day, if you wanted to file a bug report, you had to jump through hoops, and those hoops required reading contributor guidelines and how to submit a bug report. Find the mailing list, see which source control they used (if they used source control), see what kind of bug tracker they used (if they use one), figure out a form to see what to submit where… Very often, in the process of producing a bug report that would even pass the filters, you would even solve the problem yourself or at the very least produce a very good bug report that nearly diagnosed the problem.

        Now all of this “social coding” is producing a bunch of people who are afraid of putting code out there due to having to deal with the beggar masses.

        Just don’t.

        1. 7

          I totally agree that your own needs are the top priority if you are an OSS provider. Nobody has a divine right to your time.

          I do think that having people be able to report bugs easily is really good. For even relatively small projects, this also serves as a bit of a usability forum, with non-maintainers able to chime in and help. This can give the basis for a supportive community so the owner isn’t swamped with things. Many people want to help as well.

          Though if this is your “personal project”, then it could be very annoying (I think you can turn off issues in GH luckily?).

          Ultimately though, the fact that huge projects used by a bazillion tech companies have funding of around $0 is shameful. Things like Celery, used by almost every major Python shop, do not have the resources to package releases because it’s basically a couple people who spend their time getting yelled at. We desperately need more money in the OSS ecosystem so people can actually build things in a sustainable way without having to suffer all this stress.

          Hard to overestimate how much a stable paycheck makes things more bearable

          1. 5

            “Back in the day, if you wanted to file a bug report, you had to jump through hoops”

            This is where I disagree. Both maintainer and other contributors’ time are valuable. Many folks won’t contribute a bug report or fix if you put time wasting obstacles in their path. Goes double if they know it was there intentionally. I remember I did one for Servo on Github just because it was easy to do so. I didnt have time to spare to do anything but try some critical features and throw a bug report on whatever I found.

            I doubt Im the only one out there that’s more likely to help when it’s easy to do so.

            1. 5

              This is where I disagree. Both maintainer and other contributors’ time are valuable.

              !!!!!

              I remember I did one for Servo on Github just because it was easy to do so. I didnt have time to spare to do anything but try some critical features and throw a bug report on whatever I found.

              @manishearth, who set up http://starters.servo.org, dropped this very nice sentence about contribution: “People don’t start out serious, they start out curious.”

              1. 4

                The problem is that projects don’t survive on such drive-by fixes alone. Yes, you fixed a bug and that’s a good thing, but the project would probably still run along just fine without that fix. And you never came back. In the long term, what projects have to care about are interested people who keep coming back. The others really don’t matter that much.

                1. 5

                  I think this is a bit like a consumer acquisition funnel.

                  Every contributor first started off by providing a drive-by fix. If they do it enough, now they’re contributing a lot. Now you have full-time contributors.

                  1. 1

                    Sure but the question was about how high the bar for such drive-by contributions can be while still keeping a project healthy, based on the premise that making drive-by contributions too easy can result in toxic community behaviour overwhelming active maintainers.

                    1. 3

                      The “height of the contribution bar” as quality control is - in my experience - a myth. The “denying low quality contributions” is not.

                      I’ll explain why: the bar to unfounded complaints and troll is always very low. If you have an open web form somewhere, someone will mistake it for a garbage bin. And that’s what sucks you down. Dealing with those in an assertive manner gets easier when you have a group.

                      The bar to attempting contribution should be as low as possible. You’d want to make people aware that they can contribute and that they can get started very easily. You will always have to train - projects got workflows, styles, etc. that people can’t all learn in one go. Mentoring also gets somewhat easier as a group.

                      Saying “no” to a contribution is a hard. Get used to it, no one takes that off you. But it must be done.

                      Also, there’s a trend to have people voicing their frustrations blamed as “no respecting the maintainers”. There’s pretty often complaints that have some truth in them. Often, a “you’re right, can we help you with fixing it on your own?” is better then throwing stuff screenshots on Twitter.

                      1. 1

                        I agree with you but quality control is, again, a separate question. I wasn’t talking about quality control. The question is about how to best attract only those people with an appropriate kind of behaviour that won’t end up burning out maintainers, and whether a bar to contribution can factor into this.

                        I think JordiGH’s point was that if someone has to jump through some hoops to even find the right forum of communication to use (which mailing list and/or bug tracker, etc.), just by showing up at a place where maintainers will listen a contributor shows they have spent time and enganged their brains a bit to read a minimum necessary amount of text about how the project and its community works. This can be achieved, for instance, with a landing page that doesn’t directly ask people to submit code by pushing a simple button, but directs them to a document which explains how and where to make contributions.

                        If instead people can click through a social media website they sign up on only once and then have their proposed changes to various projects appear in every maintainer’s face right away with minmal effort because that’s how the site was designed, it’s no surprise that mentoring new contributors becomes relatively harder for maintainers, isn’t it? I mean, seriously, blog posts about depressed open source maintainers seem to mostly involve people using such sites.

                  2. 1

                    Id considered this but do we really have data proving it? And on projects trying to cast a wide net vs those that dont? I could imagine that scenario would be fine for OpenBSD aiming for quality but Ruby library or something might be fine with extra little commits over time.

                    1. 2

                      I think you’ll always need at least one developer dedicated enough to give the project a home, integrate changes, drive releases, and so on.

                      A pile of drive-by patches and pull requests with nothing holding them together is not a “project”.

                      Edit: BTW you said “extra little commits” and i said “drive-by fixes alone” so we may be talking past each other a bit… :)

                2. 3

                  Really, just stop. Maintaining it, I mean. Unless you have contractual obligations or it’s a job or something, just tune it all out. Who cares if people have problems. Help if you can, help if it makes you happy, and if it doesn’t, it’s not your problem and just walk away. It’s not worth your unhappiness. If you can, put a big flag that says “I’m not maintaining this, feel free to fork!” and maybe someone else will take it over, but if they don’t, that’s fine too. It’s also fine if you don’t put a flag! No skin off your nose! You don’t owe anything to anyone!

                  Totally. In this scenario, you should just quit cold turkey.

                  The rest of the post is more advice that I’ve found myself giving multiple times to people who do want to keep maintaining the project, or be active in their larger community, but aren’t super focused on that particular library anymore.

                  1. 2

                    There’s a lot of poor communication out there with unstated assumptions on each side for relationships not just open source and that drives a lot of frustration and resentment. There are dozens of books on the subject in the self-help aisle of bookstores. The points in the article are all good advice but I think the best advice is to make it clear what on terms you volunteer your work and not be ashamed to say “I don’t want to do this but feel free to do it or fork it” if it’s not scratching your itch.

                    Personally, I’ve turned away issues resulting from old and on bleeding-edge compiler or library releases and on OS’s or equipment I don’t run (doesn’t behave on Windows XP? doesn’t work with Chinese clone of hardware? Hell if I know…)

                  1. 4

                    I don’t have a phone. I had a dumbphone for a while because a girlfriend wanted to contact me on it, but I stopped using it after I broke up with her.

                    I don’t want a phone again, and I definitely do not want a pocket computer. I manage just fine, although sometimes I have to manage people’s expectations about me and explain that I don’t have a phone. Thus, appointments are made and kept, no last-minute cancellations from either side without extenuating circumstances. One consequence of not having a pocket computer, I think, is that there are a lot less emergencies.

                    1. 4

                      I found this via the author’s Masto account, in case anyone wants to follow her:

                      https://mastodon.social/@sylvia_ritter

                      1. 8

                        For some reason, no standards define this function (pid_t ppid(pid_t)).

                        This has always been a thorn in my side. A lot of people talk about POSIX but how many people actually code to POSIX? There’s so much you can’t do in POSIX. You can’t even get the size of a disk POSIXly from C. You have to either shell out or rely on system-specific utilities. I found the standard to be so narrow to be essentially useless and instead had to rely on #ifdef LINUX, #ifdef OPENBSD, and so on.

                        POSIX is a very, very low bar to clear if you want to write an OS that conforms to it.

                        1. 1

                          I expect it would be a very small meetup, but I might be interested in making the trip from Mtl to TO.

                          1. 1

                            I’d go to an MTL meetup, TO is a bit too far!

                            1. 1

                              We can meet halfway in Ottawa.

                          1. 2

                            If you’re using backports on top of stable then you’re effectively using a less-popular, less-well-tested variant of testing.

                            In theory regular stable releases make sense for a distribution that extensively patches and integrates the software it distributes. But given that Debian’s policy and practices predictably lead to major security vulnerabilities like their SSH key vulnerability, I figure such patching and integrating is worse than useless, and prefer distributions that ship “vanilla” upstream software as far as possible. Such distributions have much less need for a slow stable release cadence like Debian’s, because there’s far less modification and integration to be doing.

                            1. 6

                              a less-popular, less-well-tested variant of testing.

                              Not at all. Going to testing means moving everything to testing. Moving Linux, moving gcc, moving libc. Stable + backports means almost everything is on stable except the things you explicitly move to backports. My current package distribution is:

                              stretch: 5323
                              stretch-backports: 7
                              

                              The 7 packages I have from backports are: ldc, liboctave-dev, liboctave4, libphobos2-ldc-dev, libphobos2-ldc72, octave, and octave-common. Just Octave and the LDC compiler for D. Hardly could call them important system packages.

                              1. 1

                                It’s worth remembering that the purpose of the computer is to run user programs, not to run the OS. I’d suggest that the programs a user enables backports for are likely to be those programs the user cares most about - precisely the most important packages.

                                1. 5

                                  I am running stable because I don’t want to have distracting glitches on the side of the things I actually care about. I have the energy to chase after D or Octave bugs (after all, it’s kind of what I do), so I do want newer things of those. I don’t want to be chasing after Gnome or graphics driver bugs. Those system things get frozen so I can focus on the things I have the energy for.

                                  1. 1

                                    As a maintainer you’re in a rather unusual position; you’re, in a sense, running Octave for the sake of running Octave. Whereas most people with Octave installed are probably using Octave to do something, in which case Octave bugs would be a serious issue for them, probably more so than bugs in Gnome or graphics drivers.

                              2. 4

                                But given that Debian’s policy and practices predictably lead to major security vulnerabilities like their SSH key vulnerability

                                Could you elaborate on that? How do those policies and practices do so predictably? And what would preferable alternatives look like in your opinion?

                                1. 4

                                  Making changes to security-critical code without having them audited specifically from a security perspective will predictably result in security vulnerabilities. Preferred alternatives would be either to have a dedicated, qualified security team review all Debian changes to security-critical code, or to exempt security-critical code from Debian’s policy of aggressively patching upstream code to comply with Debian policy. Tools like OpenSSH do by and large receive adequate security review but those researchers and security professional work with the “vanilla” source from upstream; no-one qualified is reviewing the Debian-patched version of OpenSSH and that’s still true even after one of the biggest security vulnerabilities in software history.

                                1. 2

                                  This is a lot like the David Foster Wallace commencement speech, “This Is Water.” It’s easier to find a link to the video than to the transcript, so here’s the latter.

                                  http://bulletin-archive.kenyon.edu/x4280.html

                                  1. 2

                                    But…

                                    from Strange Loop 2015

                                    1. 2

                                      Ah, seems Gary only released the video this month, I presumed the recording was more recent.

                                  1. 4

                                    This piece was beautiful. I’ve perennially been chronically impatient with my own mom, and this reminded me once again that a little patience can go a long way.

                                    I’m definitely going to start rethinking my attitudes about many of my interactions now.

                                    1. 4

                                      One important takeaway from this, which Brie Code also makes is that videogames aren’t very accessible. I really want them to be so because I want to share the stories, music, and artwork from videogames with more people, but it’s difficult to do so if they can’t get past the accessibility issues. I’m also kind of surprised the author’s mom wasn’t completely put off by Cindy, because I certainly am, and I know many people who just don’t feel like the game is for them when a character dressed up like Cindy shows up.

                                    1. 10

                                      About to wind down for a long Christmas break, going to travel to Mexico to see my family. Haven’t been there in a long time! I really need a dose of Mexico again to feel “Mexican” once more. I try to keep up with Mexican culture online, but it’s hard to “stay Mexican” when you’re not submerged in it. I’m not sure if other expats/immigrants can relate to the experience.

                                      Speaking of being Mexican, I went to watch Coco, and it’s a surprisingly accurate pastiche of Mexico (except that everyone mostly speaks English, of course). A lot of the underworld architecture was obviously inspired by things like Chapultepec Castle or the Postal Palace or the street layout of Guanajuato. I have only found this last one overtly acknowledged by the filmmakers.

                                      I’ve also been having lots of fun with Advent of Code. I am learning so much about D now that I’m really using it in earnest. I plan to write a blog post after Christmas, “Advent of D”, detailing what I’ve learned. The experiment has both strengthened my love for D and shown me some of its weak points (and no, it’s not the GC). I’m really excited that I can match C speed with D, even with range-checking enabled in the final binary!

                                      1. 6

                                        British ex-pat here. I understand what you’re saying regarding not feeling “you”, and can relate but with a different spin. :-)

                                        In my personal experience living in a country not of my birth for going on 13 years, I don’t really consider myself British anymore, but a global citizen; however this is not something I feel I’ve lost. If I’m in the UK, I miss my new home (where I’m now a citizen), and when I’m home, I miss the UK (well, some of it; there are good reasons I left… ;-)).

                                        The only way to reconcile this strange lack of belonging is considering myself a human of the universe. Countries are kinda weird concepts anyways. Hat-tip John Lennon etc.

                                        That all being said, I have fierce national pride for my new homeland, Canada. It’s the best place I’ve ever been, and I’m continually more proud to call it my home. Perhaps it’s this that has led me to not care so much about national pride in my country of origin? If I had to pick one and only one, I wouldn’t hesitate to pick Canada.

                                        [Work]

                                        I started a new job a couple of weeks ago, and I’m ramping up there. This week is a bit of a wind down until the solstice shutdown period, however, so things are light. It’s a good time to arrive on board.

                                        [Home]

                                        Over Christmas break I plan to cut a new release of kurly, which is coming along nicely.

                                        And yes, Advent of Code when time permits.

                                        1. 4

                                          I love Canada too! In particular Francophone culture and Montréal, where I am now. Where are you?

                                          It’s not national borders and politics so much that is important for me. Hell, if it were up to me, burn all flags (CW: ska). Rather, it’s the culture. The stories, the language, the beliefs, the music, the food – the things that make us feel Mexican. I know Mexico is a place with a lot of trouble, although I am privileged enough to have only left because of mild discomfort. I don’t want to wave a flag over all the problems in order to hide them.

                                          Anyways, warm season’s greetings to you, fellow world national!

                                          1. 4

                                            I live in a tiny town called Cobourg, in Ontario about two hours east of Toronto. Whilst I work full time remote, my company has an office in Montréal as it happens; next time I go there I’ll ping you for a pint. :-)

                                            I totally understand why you miss Mexico from a cultural perspective; that’s quite a gap.

                                      1. 5

                                        Huh, nameless workflows. I should try that.

                                        1. 1

                                          The nameless workflows and workspaces reminds me a bit of using Gerrit: you push an unnamed thing (a ref) to another ref to open a change list (aka, a PR). No need to name a local branch.

                                          Unfortunately, a little bit of metadata is still needed (namely the “Change-Id” line in the commit message), so Gerrit can track revisions of a change across refs. But in theory that could be stored in a way that it’s invisible to end users, and be tracked across rebases and amends.

                                          1. 1

                                            Me, too! My previous team used hg named branches as feature branches (they had, a few years before I joined, migrated from CVS to hg so this was a huge step up) and their workflow bloated the shared repo to such an extent that occasionally clients would fail to push/pull because there were too many tips to compare.

                                          1. 1

                                            Looking for a job still

                                            1. 1

                                              Oh, not an enviable position. Good luck with the search!

                                            1. 7

                                              I just merged Python 2.7.14 into Tauthon (a Python 2.7.13 fork with backwards-compatible Python3 features) and now I’m waiting for feedback on my pull request: https://github.com/naftaliharris/tauthon/pull/85

                                              KDiff3 made manually merging dozens of files a bit easier, but I still had to follow a Tauthon - Python 2.7.13 diff to make sure nothing slipped through the cracks. To make matters more interesting, some files needed modifications from both sides and, on top of that, there was no base commit since Tauthon was forked when Python was still on Mercurial.

                                              Anyway, the 2-way merge was successful and the tests passed. It took me about 15 hours over 3 days, all because I was bothered by a Reddit comment saying that Tauthon is not able to keep track of the latest Python2 fixes :-)


                                              later edit: the pull request was accepted

                                              1. 2

                                                Much to my surprise, it seems that Python 3 conversion really is happening, but I still see a place for Tauthon. It might help with incremental upgrades, perhaps with something like from __future__ import unicode_literals or something.

                                              1. 9

                                                AdventOfCode!

                                                OK, it’s only a small part of the week, but it is fun.

                                                1. 2

                                                  Thanks for the reminder, I’d completely forgotten about it.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    I’m in smug mode because today’s problem only took me 11 minutes. I would have been on the leaderboard if I’d actually got up at 5am!

                                                    (We’ll gloss over the days that have taken me hours of head scratching :) )

                                                    1. 1

                                                      That leaderboard seems a bit silly. Perhaps they should be timing it from the moment that a particular user first loads the page, although that’s cheatable too.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Yeah, there’s really no way to make it work that can’t be gamed. Personally, I’m happy to noodle about solving the puzzles without worrying about the leaderboard. Not getting up at 5am is something of an incentive…

                                                  2. 2

                                                    I’m in the lead on my private leaderboard, so the pressure’s on to keep it!

                                                    AoC is definitely one of my favorite things :)

                                                    1. 2

                                                      Having lots of fun with it myself too. Really getting to learn what D can do:

                                                      http://inversethought.com/hg/aoc/file/tip/2017/

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Cool that you’re learning it since it doesn’t get much attention. I’d be interested in your impressions of it by the end on top of what language background you came from before D.

                                                    1. 5

                                                      I’m reading Oathbreaker by Brandon Sanderson, it’s not networking, it’s not sci-fi, but it certainly is good!

                                                      1. 3

                                                        For more fantasy, I’m reading the Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson. It’s ten books and I’m currently about to finish the sixth. Definitely a great read for anyone who loves good worldbuilding or fantasy characterization.

                                                        1. 3

                                                          This series is the only fantasy blockbuster series I’ve finished. Good quality right up until maybe the end. I especially like the shift to an entirely different continent and system of magic around book 5.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            I got to 6 or 7 in the series and started to lose track of what was going on. I absolutely love the world though, and definitely intend to pick them back up in the future.

                                                          2. 2

                                                            How are the other books in the series ?

                                                            1. 3

                                                              I really enjoyed them. I’m a big fan of Sanderson’s work generally, and this series seems to be one of his best so far.

                                                              However if you’re considering starting the series, you should know that it’s only 3/5 complete, so you’ll have a long wait to finish it!

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I waited for “The Wheel of Time”. I just hope it is fun to read!

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I’ve not read it, I’ll stick it on my list :)

                                                            2. 2

                                                              it’s not networking, it’s not sci-fi,

                                                              Honestly, I’m really eager for that kind of discussion around here. I get tired of everyone recommending the same circle of tech books or science fiction.

                                                              Thanks for the suggestion, I’ll take a look!

                                                              Edit: Oh… it’s fantasy. Erm, I suppose the tribe doesn’t wander far from the community-approved genres.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                If you like history, I’m still chewing on Empire of the Steppes. The book is always described as “majestic” and “sweeping”. I’ve never read another history book that provides such an encompassing view. Its scope extends from mainland China, to the silk road oasis kingdoms, to Persia, to Kiev, to Attila’s march on Rome. It’s fascinating how a military campaign in China can set off a chain reaction like billiard balls and cause an invasion in Europe.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Another amazing history is Jonathan Spence’s God’s Chinese Son, but really, you cannot go wrong with Spence. He is a magician.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    Oooh, that does sound great! Thanks, I’ll definitely look for that one!

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I’ve been reading The Knitter’s Almanac again. Elizabeth Zimmerman is a fun read. I don’t plan to knit anything from it right now, but I would still recommend her works to anyone, even if you’re not a knitter.

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Been reading Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood… dystopian sci-fi… so far, I’m quite fond of it.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Ooh thanks for that. Just finished the recent remake of A Handmaid’s Tale and first read the book just a few years back. She’s amazing. Will definitely look that up.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Read the sequels. I think the whole trilogy is quite good.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      I can’t talk about my work, but I am immensely enjoying solving each day’s Advent of Code problem.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Day 3 kicked my ass but day 4 was easy. If you didn’t know, we have a GitHub group/IRC channel for doing it with your fellow crustaceans.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Whoa, thanks man!

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Yeah, I cheated for the second part Day 3 by looking it up in OEIS. That’s because I’ve been doing them at the end of the day and was afraid to miss the “deadline”. But once the pressure to get an answer quickly went away, I went back and actually redid part 2.

                                                                            My work so far.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Is the group for feedback and such? I’ve been looking for something like that to work through problems with a group and get some feedback maybe. I’ve never really participated in Advent Of Code before.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            but I’m a audial-visual learner

                                                                            Everyone is. Everyone can get bored during a lecture. Everyone can understand a graph better than a list of numbers.

                                                                            Learning styles are a pervasive myth.

                                                                            https://www.wired.com/2015/01/need-know-learning-styles-myth-two-minutes/

                                                                            1. 10

                                                                              I’m not an audio-visual learner. I have aphantasia and cannot visualize, as well as auditory processing issues which make it impossible to follow most lecturers (unless their voice is exceptionally clear and they talk slowly). I need to read something to understand it.

                                                                              The learning styles research is, indeed, persistently mischaracterized, and people who focus on it will explain this in detail.

                                                                              But disabilities exist and create most of the same accessibility needs which are often justified by appeal to learning styles. Academia is, in general but with some noteworthy exceptions, hostile to any discussion of accessibility. So that’s a complicating factor in any discussion like this…

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                Okay, but disabilities are not what people mean when they are talking about learning styles. I’m sure you also understand the gist of a data set better via a good graph a better than a list of numbers and you also can get much more easily bored or distracted during a lecture, like you just said, particularly if there’s a computer or book in front of you competing for your attention.

                                                                                I live with someone with disabilities and I understand the need for corresponding accommodation. But the learning styles myth furthers the idea that everyone needs their own special unique kind of accommodation, which isn’t the case. Odds are that if someone is having trouble learning something by a particular method then the majority of students are also struggling with that same method.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  I’m not sure what you mean. I do, in fact, support making material available in multiple formats. It’s a best practice for accessibility, in fact.