1. 4

    Company: Bitnomial

    Company site: https://bitnomial.com

    Position(s): Software engineer, operations engineer

    Location: Chicago, IL No remote unfortunately

    Description: We’re building a Bitcoin derivatives exchange all written in Haskell. We use ansible and terraform for our operations automation. Trading industry experience is a plus.

    Contact: careers@bitnomial.com

    1. 2

      Check out some of our open source projects at https://github.com/bitnomial

      1. 1

        maybe page @jcs to merge?

        1. 1

          Oops good catch. Thanks. @jcs merged them.

        1. 1

          Where’s the source code? The page had no links.

          1. 1

            It looks like the source code is only available through Git. In “Getting started”, the page says you can run git clone http://git.coders.se/kore.git to download the code. (As that link reveals, http://coders.se/kore/ is an alternative URL for https://kore.io/.)

            I would mirror the code on GitHub so you could browse it, but neither the page nor the code contains a license yet. But here’s a preview of the file tree.

          1. 2

            I like it. Do you think little voting arrows are an artifact of a mouse and not very touch friendly? I know you can swipe to vote but what about down and unvoting? All in all great job though. Can’t wait until it hits the App Store. You planning on free?

            1. 2

              Swipe right to upvote or undownvote, left to downvote or unupvote maybe? Long tap to send to instapaper?

              1. 1

                That’s one way I’m thinking of approaching it, Clear and Twitterrific 5 have made me a huge fan of using those swipe gestures to act on an item. Another approach would be the Tweetie 2 style interaction where you slide a cell off to the right to reveal buttons behind it, but I’ve never been a huge fan of that interaction.

              2. 1

                The arrows here do still serve a purpose in letting you know whether you’ve voted on a story, but tapping them does nothing. I’ve been trying to come up with a better way to show users they’ve voted on a story that’s better suited to the touch-based context with no luck so far. I’m curious if anyone else has a good idea how this could be handled.

                Also as far as price I’ll probably charge $1-2 for it although the project will remain entirely open-source.

                1. 2

                  I hate to mention BaconReader again, but it solves this problem by lightly coloring the background of voted stories. Light orange is used for a positive vote, and light blue is used for a downvote.

                  1. 1

                    I think that works well for Reddit where those arrows already have a strong correlation to certain colours, but here both upvote and downvote arrows are red. Maybe a very light yellow background on stories you’ve vote up and faded text on ones you’ve voted down? I think that would be enough to visually emphasise/deemphasise them. I’ll try mocking it up later.

                    1. 3

                      Okay I quickly mocked it up, here’s what that might look like, the arrows are still there because I didn’t have to time to go through and delete them all but I’ll probably get rid of them entirely now.

                      1. 1

                        Nice! I like that

              1. 1

                This is a must-read for any Haskell dev as well as interested compiler designers. Compared to other compilers I’ve seen, GHC has some pretty interesting design choices like “everything is a Haskell library” and “there’s no symbol table”. Though long, it’s worth the read.

                1. 1

                  What about changing the Lobsters “economy” a bit to promote the type of community we want?

                  1. Comment votes (up and down) count for more karma than story votes. Promote discussion.
                  2. Karma per story/comment gives extra abilities. Promote contributions.
                  3. Absolute-karma and karma-per-story/comment are both shown side by side to promote quantity and quality of contributions. Promote quality.
                  4. Meta stories/comments votes don’t count towards karma (but still can move the comment to the top of the list). Promote normal discussion.
                  1. 7

                    I prefer the current “if you can’t find a tag for it, it probably doesn’t belong” situation.

                    1. 4

                      How should I tag something about Haskell? Last I checked there was no tag for that. Meanwhile, the “science” tag seems like quite a catch-all that doesn’t help distinguish topics.

                      1. 2

                        Agreed. I think the real issue is currently the finite set of tags is being used as a filter. Instead, if we focused on tags just being metadata, tags could provide more value. I realized my main use for tags is not filtering but I just like them for visually grepping the stories.

                      2. 3

                        I think that’s what the voting is for: making sure the stories are things the community wants to read.

                      1. 2

                        The main use-case here would be a ton of stories being posted about a new topic I don’t care to read about. The current process would the new topic to be recognized as needing a tag and requested by someone. We’d discuss and hopefully an admin would pick it up. User-defined tags, on the other hand, with the auto-lookup feature would allow this process to happen naturally and in real time. Maybe even allow other readers to add tags to stories after posting.

                        1. 1

                          Thanks for the comments :)

                          It’s interesting that there seemed to be many people on HN clamoring for an invite, and now it seems that they mostly just wanted Yet Another News Source. But you can get that without being registered, so what’s the point?

                          I suppose the next meta question is how do you encourage people to comment. And how to do so in way that does not promote bullshit participation.

                          My own reasons for not commenting tend to be either a decent comment would take more time then I have available, or I don’t know enough to say anything useful. Or I’m reading on my phone and commenting anything of value is too tedious.

                          1. 2

                            IMHO comments will happen naturally. We’re all still getting to know each other. It took me a long time reading HN before I felt I had comments people may find useful. It will just take time.

                          1. 1

                            Anyone have any other recommendations for facial recognition?

                            1. 2

                              Proposed tag: other programming language. For programming language specific posts that do not have their own tags (like javascript, lua, c, go etc have, and scala, haskell, ats etc lack). This saves adding tons of tags for more programming languages.

                              1. 1

                                What would the (short) tag be? “otherprog”?

                                1. 1

                                  I would suggest ‘otherlang’, though that is getting long for a short tag.

                                2. 1

                                  I’m not a big fan of negation categories. It’d be better to have a “PL” tag for programming languages and then an additional tag for the specific PL if it’s available.

                                  1. 1

                                    Okay, how about ‘PL’ for stuff about programming language design, and ‘lang’ about stuff specific to a programming language that is otherwise not in the list of languages?

                                1. 2

                                  Proposed tag: haskell

                                  Not sure if there’s enough interest but that’s what the voting is for =)