Threads for MrFantastik

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    Not open source and I’m not able to confirm this personally but instagram?

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      Thanks! I want to have a look at the commits at least, so I can see what kind of discussions took place.

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      virtual onsite at amazon this week, wish me luck!

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        Good luck indeed! Study the leadership principles and think through the answers you might give if someone asked you pointed questions about your career up to now based around them.

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          Good luck!

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          Very cool, noticed the hello world example does not reflect human play however. I wonder about strategies that would include both a realistic game play plus a hidden message.

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            I’m doing reading that I think will be helpful for my grad school application (master’s in Scottish Ethnology) and have just discovered the magic of org-roam for Zettelkasten-style note-taking in Emacs. This week I produced 3300 words of notes spanning 93 files, but I’m a little behind on my reading plan and want to catch up this weekend. There are also a few org-roam features that I’m aware of but need to learn how to use, such as tagging and launching a server that dishes up an interactive mind map

            Would love to talk to anyone who has experience with humanities grad school, org-roam, etc!

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              org-roam is fantastic! Especially when paired with org-protocol, you can add a reffed entry straight from your browser. If you are in school and writing lots of papers, org-ref plays nicely with it as well which is a game changer if you re the sort to write lots of papers. Its one of those things where I wished I had a use case because the workflow was so nice.

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                Good to get the encouragement about org-ref. I’ve been handling that very manually right now and it’s not great.

                On the one hand it’s a little overwhelming to figure out how to use all the relevant bits of the org ecosystem, but on the other it’s nice that I can be productive now and still have room to become more efficient by doing some toolsmithing. I’m excited for my setup to evolve. And, for that matter, am excited for when I have 100k words of notes spanning 500 files. A lot of papers is the goal!

                It’s an interesting place to be: there’s still a lot of low-hanging fruit in the field (18th-century Scottish music history) since not many people are working on it and the internet has made so many more primary sources easily available. A lot of the top scholarship was written in the ’80s and was an admirable effort, but of course they were limited by having to physically travel to many far-flung libraries and use incomplete physical card catalogs to access materials.

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              Now we need to be able to use an excel as a server-less application service.

              Upload the excel to the servers, and call the init function.

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                It’s not complete, but covers enough I’ve used this once or twice to do that: https://pypi.org/project/pycel/

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                  fwiw GSheets makes for a great ui for your internal non programming fellows, you can easily link it with a cloud function and have it populate a proper app database. I used it for a quick and dirty RBAC dashboard before, no regrets.

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                    How do you access it via api? Don’t you need oauth?

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                      I added a big “save” button in the google sheet that triggered a cloud function. Cloud function did an immutable update in the db table.

                      If you are referring to the permissions of the sheet to exec the functions, yes you need to oauth it. I did then invite the right users to share the sheet. It was for minor company stuff, and I’m aware that security is terrible, but for a quick and dirty app that was good enough.

                      I would NOT recommend on a public sheet!!

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                  If you’re interested in this, and like visual novels, Logicomix might be for you.

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                    My mom bought this for me when I was in highschool and it absolutely shattered my perspective on math. Highly recommend!

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                      It amuses me to see Emacs people going very far not to use any other tools but Emacs itself. Not that I don’t respect it, as someone who really tried to use Emacs for months, nothing but respect for those with the patience.

                      Regarding Gantt charts, I love OmniPlan. Perhaps it’s on the expensive side, and unfortunately you’re limited to macOS, but I’ve found it’s the only decent Gantt chart tool for Mac.

                      They just rolled out version 4, which hints a move towards subscription-based pseudo-ownership, but they kept the traditional buy-once model available, so there’s that.

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                        Speaking as an emacs user, its not so much that I will do anything to stay in emacs, but more the fact that emacs provides me an environment to integrate all these tools cohesively.

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                        Taken one step further, don’t apologize for anything. When you constantly apologize for something the meaning of those apologies start to mean less and less. Then when you actually fuck something up and need to apologize, everyone has already heard it 1000 times.

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                          Using a third party to do something like this doesn’t seem kosher, but this seems like a useful resource to generate test data

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                            Everything is done client-side, so doesn’t seem worse than a CLI tool to me. You’re pretty much always using a third party in that sense.

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                            It would be interesting to attach this to some sort of chatbot, then I can be constantly interviewing and getting job offers.

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                              Leading on my first project, any advice?

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                                admittedly partly due to the way I tried to misuse it

                                Curious to what the author means by this. Mostly because I have done some hacking with Gatsby myself and have definitely been down some rabbit holes. I wound up sticking with it though because of the customizeability of the platform is great for personal use.

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                                  It makes me uncomfortable many people don’t even consider Git as a standalone software. For many it’s just an implementation detail of their Gitlab or other frontend of the month. I’m not sure what to think about it.

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                                    That’s kind of what made me try to dig into Git.

                                    I also discovered annexes in Git, which are pretty neat (here), but which I deemed out of scope for this article.

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                                      Thought it might be worth linking to the source :^)

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                                        git-annex is quite cool, and an interesting alternative to Git LFS that is easier to maintain yourself (doesn’t require a custom server, and supports multiple servers rather than requiring a canonical one). That being said it makes sense you left it out of this article — it’s not actually “barebones” git, it’s a separate package that’s maintained separately (almost entirely by its original author, Joey Hess).

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                                          annexes look pretty cool, I wouldn’t mind seeing an article with your workflow with that.

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                                            Never seriously tried them, but I might do, and write something on that topic.

                                            I’m already gonna write an article on man, and writing documentation pages.

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                                        This sick, will try today

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                                          I use an org-babel file, but it’s been a couple of years since I’ve thrown the whole mess overboard and restarted, so that might happen soon. sigh.

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                                            I’m confused, is this like jupyter notebooks but everything within a org file ?

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                                              That’s exactly what it is

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                                                Yep. You write everything in org format and then it gets untangled into elisp, which Emacs uses to startup. It’s very nice, if you comment everything. Which I don’t really do, so I lose the benefit of the literate style.

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                                              Very interesting article, particularly

                                              (Yes, cognitive resources can be partly replenished throughout the day by getting glucose to the brain, but be careful with that. A high-protein snack combined with small infrequent sips on a sports drink can help, a lot.)

                                              Wish they posted a source for that, but that seems like it will be a fun rabbit hole to explore.

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                                                It’s probably partly out of Kahneman: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thinking,_Fast_and_Slow

                                                Note about that book, as this is never mentioned in the reviews/summaries: Kahneman explicitly states in the foreword that this book is not a rigorous scientific work, but a summary of his work for the “water cooler discussion”. It’s accessible and interesting, but also don’t expect many sources there.

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                                                I’d be happy to go through rigmarole of setting up a wallet and donating the ones I got to a worthy cause (I opted out of the next drop). No Nazis, extropians, or bros need apply.

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                                                  PAH” or “Liberty in North Korea”, maybe? If not, there are still quite some other cases one can see as worthy, so I don’t see a reason not to choose one of them.

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                                                    Give it to your favorite open source project

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                                                      I’ve got about 27 million rows of cdc mortality data that I’m normalizing and gonna try to get it into some sort of data store and slap an api on. The interface the cdc provides for interacting with it seriously sucks and I’m open to suggestions for how to store a bunch of essentially a bunch of static data that will be updated once a year.

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                                                        Postgresql can probably eat that for breakfast.

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                                                          I’m working with a nearly 100 million-row dataset and can confirm postgresql ate it up without an issue.

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                                                          I work for a state health department. What is your motivation to work with this data?

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                                                            Well I originally was curious about opioid deaths in relation to oxycontin after watching a documentary on the Sackler Family and then found that the https://wonder.cdc.gov/ didn’t export full rows of data for large queries (understandably) and the format that the exportable data was in was difficult to parse and understand. I know that I can figure it out, but other people may have a hard time using data in the fix width file format. I figured I’ve been looking for a backend project anyways and making the data easier to access would be a net win for everyone.

                                                            I’m also curious about, what are the main causes of death in the usa, what are the fastest growing causes of death in the usa, and what are the most rapidly declining causes of death in the usa.

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                                                              You’re digging into CDC datasets for FUN? Well… Okay. :)

                                                              So you’re looking at these files, right, the ones in the zip files with DUSMCPUB file extensions?

                                                              You probably reviewed the documentation and know the names and sizes of each field and that there is some variation in field definitions from year to year.

                                                              I dunno about the API stuff. For me, the data would be most useful if it were in a big database that would accept SQL queries (or whatever language for the queries, though SQL wins locally for most-use-per-day). Getting the data into the DB can be done trivially with a C, Java, Python, awk, bash, whatever you like, plus a tool that can run large batches of SQL statements or even do a “bulk load” operation.

                                                              Loading data from more than one year into the same table or tables would of course require coming up with some sort of superset of columns… (With luck, the latest released year already is that superset over all the other years.)

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                                                                Well it looks like most of the data is pretty similar, I have some of the process documented here and was going to use this guide get it into postgres and then get a django api over that and maybe some graphql since I don’t think that people will need every column every time they use it. I’ll def come out with a more write up by the end of this hopefully.

                                                                I was also thinking about couchdb just get everything into a data store and have a platform to manipulate it better than just text files