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    Just watched all the talks I found interesting. The talk about the order theory viewpoint was refreshing, been waiting to see someone make these correspondences clear / public for a while! Hopefully we see a massive improvement in packaging over the next few years.

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      Agreed! I’ve been thinking a lot about the state of packaging software recently so I was very excited when PackagingCon was announced. I’m hoping that it’s a start towards many improvements in the near future.

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      This looks great - thanks to all for the work!

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        I tried to beat a python standard lib in performance by writing a C extension. I’m going to write it up as a blog post this week. It is sort of trivial but it was an interesting learning experience for me.

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          tried to beat

          Did you succeed? I’ll certainly be on the lookout for your write up!

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              Awesome! I’ll give that a read :D

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          Congratulations! Thank you @pushcx and other contributors for the incredible effort put in to maintaining and growing the lobsters community over the years.

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            It saddens me that BurntSushi felt compelled to leave. I find his contributions to be very valuable and have never seen any comments of his that were made in bad faith. I hope changes can be made to help avoid this situation in the future.

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              Well this was fine by me because I was going to write this program in C, so I didn’t really care about safety.

              This both made me chuckle and appreciate the self awareness of the author. Nice touch.

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                I haven’t used Sublime Text since around 2010 but decided to install this latest version to try it out. I’m actually blown away by the speed and efficiency - beyond simply the startup speed.

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                  Yeah, how everyone got so excited by VS Code is beyond me. Sublime Text is the real deal :D

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                    Hm I think this should be pretty obvious, no? It’s pretty clear that ST is faster and more robust, but it’s also obvious that VS has more semantics-aware features. Some people value features over speed.

                    It’s beyond me how people can love any specific editor? Editing text sucks everywhere except in kakoune, only IntelliJ has enough polish&power to work efficiently with large projects, everyone except VS gets plugin ecosystem wrong, nothing but Emacs has efficient keyboard drive UX outside of mere editing, and only vim is installed on the server you ssh to.

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                      (That’s not real love, it’s mostly Stockholm syndrom).

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                        Eh, close. There’s a concern I’ve seen in many devs (including, in my younger years, me) that, if you’re not using the best tooling, then you’re doing it wrong. But if you spend a lot of time trying to decide what is The Best Tool, and then really learning it, then you end up feeling a really strong need to defend whatever choice you end up making. After all, you don’t want to admit you wasted that time by making the wrong decision, do you? The more time you spend defending your choice, the more you start to identify with the choice, which in turn makes you very resistant to anything that challenges you, and very quick to overly emphasize anything positive.

                        Anyway, that’s a long way of saying that the mindset that results in people loving editors is less Stockholm Syndrome, more political cult, but you’re not far off.

                        And besides, we all know that the best editor is unconditionally and with no qualifications ed.

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                        Editing text sucks everywhere except in kakoune

                        I would be very interested to hear more on this if you’re willing. For context I use (neo) Vim or Vim bindings with other editors/IDEs.

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                          See Why Kakoune section from this document: https://kakoune.org/why-kakoune/why-kakoune.html

                          The TL;DR is that we write ciw in vim, but iwc in Kakoune, and this gives you immediate visual feedback about what exactly you are going to c

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                            Kakoune’s grammar is object followed by verb, combined with instantaneous feedback, that means you always see the current object (In Kakoune we call that the selection) before you apply your change, which allows you to correct errors on the go.

                            I find great value in rich feedback (syntax errors, typing errors etc) from an editor/IDE so bringing this to the actual text operations is very interesting.

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                        A friend of mine told me; people use electron-based editors and then are blown away with the speed of something that isn’t electron. Like obviously with something like editors, being written in say C(++) for example, is going to be faster than something that runs off web technology.

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                          A proper MRU ctrl-tab and a built in split terminal easily togable without lifting my hands from the keyboard did it for me.

                          Opening file in project using quick open and a command palete, were also requirements of mine, but other editors already had these. Sublime being one of them.

                          I have been wanting these simple features in an editor since before vscode existed. Vscode offers me that, I use it. I would be fine with other editor offering them too.

                          Their multi edit support is also ofnmy liking and I.ve been including it in my work flow more and more often.

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                        Hm, one problem I notice is that if we add a third field, like “occupation”, then we can’t guarantee we get back all useful errors. If we place the occ validator in the original block, then we can have name=Drew, age=90, which would fail validate_drew, but we’d never get there as we’d fail the occ validation. What we’d need to do is assemble the validations as a directed graph, topologically sort it, and then walk the sort and run any validations where all the prereqs are valid.

                        Unrelated, but an interesting shibboleth here: he defined Valid.apply, not Valid.__call__. With __call__ he could have written a(b) instead of a.apply(b). That tells me he knows Python but isn’t an expert at it, making me wonder if there’s a different approach to declarative validation in Python.

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                          TIL the word “shibboleth” - I like it!

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                          This looks like a great resource. I’ve been using Janet a fair bit recently and having a place to find high quality libraries will be extremely useful. Nice work!

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                            Thank you very much. I hope they are high quality, but you definitely will be able to find some rough edges. If you do, please let me know.

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                              Will do! I appreciate the openness to feedback :)

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                            This is fascinating. I use an ErgoDox EZ and I love it, however seeing posts like this makes me think there must be many more possibilities to further improve the split keyboard design!

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                              This inspires me to try this with SQLite FTS!

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                                high five

                                That was my first thought too!

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                                Sadly that’s a really difficult bit of software to use. The license states that you cannot use it in any capacity without emailing the author.

                                I’d be very hesitant to engage with this at all, unfortunately.

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                                  Yeah that licence is … interesting. I could understand emailing for permission to modify it, but just to use it seems a bit over the top.

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                                    This is an effort to fight individual exploitation in the FOSS community.

                                    By writing proprietary software. ;)

                                    The fact that the source code is available doesn’t make it less proprietary.

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                                    Where do you see the license?

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                                      It’s at the bottom of README.md.

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                                      Not at all. Compiling and running the code privately or for educational purposes would fall under fair use.

                                      Exploitation is a huge problem in the community, and it starts with little acts like this to fight it, even if it isn’t what people are used to. And as time goes on I will refine what I do to help the problem. ☺

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                                        Exploitation is a huge problem in the community, and it starts with little acts like this to fight it, even if it isn’t what people are used to.

                                        I’m not sure this achieves anything, honestly. Other than of course, being proprietary software in an effort to “fight exploitation in the FOSS community”.

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                                          what “exploitation” are you referring to?

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                                            The most recent event, which really opened my eyes, was the the one where Amazon took over ElasticSearch.

                                            My code can still be used under fair use, and is available for reading.

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                                              Amazon didn’t take over ElaaticSearch…Elastic chose to relicense it under a proprietary license, and then Amazon forked the latest Apache 2.0 licensed version into a competing product.

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                                                Any software licensed under terms that prevent Amazon (or any other party) from doing this is not free. Maintainers of software that claims to be free software should not be able to prevent users from modifying that software in ways they disapprove of.

                                          2. 2

                                            That’s nice for users of your software in countries where Fair Use exists as a concept in copyright law.

                                            In the UK for example, the concept of Fair Use is described as Fair Dealing, and a defence exists to copyright infringement if it is for the purpose of ‘academic study’, ‘criticism or review’, or ‘reporting of current events’.

                                            Running this bot, for example, for my own use in a channel unrelated to its development, I don’t believe would reasonably fall into any of those three buckets.

                                            Have you considered a strong licence like AGPL-3.0?

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                                          I’m drafting a sort of “ultimate guide to Unix sockets” post because I haven’t seen anyone else do it before.

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                                            Surely you’ve seen Beej’s Guide, right? How does this differ?

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                                              Beej’s Guide

                                              TIL that’s a thing! It does everything that I’ve wanted to talk about so I guess I don’t need to do anything! Probably just gonna put that work into my novel then.

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                                                Beej’s Guide is fantastic! Well worth spending the time to work through IMO :)

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                                            Looks ugly.

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                                              1. -2

                                                Nice to know. 👍🏻

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                                                I’m sure the author would appreciate more constructive criticism :)

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                                                  Add paddings.

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                                                  It works really well on mobile.

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                                                    Not really.

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                                                  I probably will dabble with a scale model of a foldable geodesic dome, or better three neighboring segments of it.

                                                  If my idea works then I could have an on-demand warm&sunny place next winter. This spring I was sitting in my mom’s greenhouse, outside 4-8°C, inside 20-30°C for the lunch & coffee breaks in the sunshine if the sun was shining. Everybody should have a place like this.

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                                                    This sounds fascinating! If you publish anything about it I would most certainly be interested.

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                                                      Unfortunately, I found no way to fold a structure with plastic wrap attached to it. And when I studied the local building codes, my enthusiasm has been curbed (“directed by robert b. weide” ;) ) - license free building sizes in Upper Bavaria and domes do not go well together.

                                                      So, my personal “sunlight filling station” has materialized as yet another polytunnel, but with eletricity, lights, and WLAN.

                                                      Sitting between the two polytunnels of my mum it is very private “look, mom, no tan lines!” ;) , and having side ventilation, it is a really versatile space.

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                                                    You might want to read the papers on OKws. This was the OK Cupid web server architecture. It was designed by a few people from MIT and makes clever use of Unix domain sockets.

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                                                      MIT 6.858 Computer Systems Security covers OKws as a case study. Well worth a watch IMO (or at least a skim of the lecture notes).

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                                                        is this the one that you had in mind ? may you please let me know ? thank you kindly !

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                                                          Not GP, but seems correct. You can check the Github repo too and they have linked the paper

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                                                            Yes, that is one of the papers.

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                                                          t

                                                          Plus an extension if relevant e.g. t.txt.

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                                                            Sussman has previously given some excellent lectures on the ideas in this book. I particularly like this quote https://youtu.be/Rk76BurH384?t=2343 .

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                                                              Reading this at the moment - I’m very interested to see if/how the concepts might apply to other languages (Rust, Go and Python in particular.

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                                                                My guess is languages with fewer users have their dictionaries prepared by professional linguists, while more common languages dictionaries are authored by IT people.

                                                                Falsehoods programmers believe about languages

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                                                                  Hehe. BTW, I once thought that during digging into hunspell I found enough interesting stuff to write quite a lengthy article in a “falsehoods programmers believe about”, fully dedicated to spellchecking :)

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                                                                    I would certainly read that!