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    There is also nice drawing by twitter user cathodegaytube

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      It’s sad this is even needed. Unfortunately some people think that publishing some code oblige you to support it.

      I remember people being upset at Dominic Tarr who transferred ownership of one of his npm modules to new maintainer who turned out to have malicious intents. People were upset that Tarr allowed new maintainer to use his old repository (instead forcing regular fork) or something like that.

      Unless you are paid to provide support you don’t have any obligation to user of your FOSS code whatsoever.

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        Many people are aware of the “no warranties” part of most FLOSS licenses.

        But Github etc. have made contributing to software development easy and dare I say it , friendly. For better or worse, people expect maintenance and support, and a minority demand it.

        While a gruff “read the damn license and leave me alone” is the techically correct way to communicate an absence of support, having a clear, unambigious and neutral way to communicate that is for the better in general.

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          People were upset that Tarr allowed new maintainer to use his old repository (instead forcing regular fork) or something like that.

          Unless you are paid to provide support you don’t have any obligation to user of your FOSS code whatsoever.

          I don’t know anything about that particular situation but there’s a difference between obligation and trust. Open source authors do not have any obligation towards users of their code. However, if you use someone else’s code in your project or on your computer, you have a choice to make. You can either read and personally vet every line of the third-party code (which takes just as much, if not more effort than simply writing it yourself in the first place), or you can choose to trust that the author has no ill intent towards you. Almost without exception, we chose the latter and because of that, the whole open source software community is built upon trust (and to a lesser degree) reputation.

          If you have some code that the open source community trusts, you certainly have the right to hand it off to anyone you chose. There is no obligation to manage the code in any particular way, or at all. But if you don’t vouch for that person, and they do something underhanded with it, those who comprise the community is well within their rights to no longer trust you.

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            It’s very useful to know the status of a project when e.g. comparing alternatives or to know whether submitting an issue is not a waste of time. The choice here is not ‘either you buy support or you assume it is abandoned’. There is plenty of communication bandwidth available.

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            Kakoune looks extremely cool, but I’m always stopped by two things:

            1. No windows support. I currently use Linux but have been seriously considering moving back to windows
            2. I’ve got a really, really big vimrc. This was called out in the article, and it’s a real problem 😔
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              Oh, super curious, why are you considering a move to Windows? I personally use both OSes from time to time, but never heard of a person publicly speaking about going in this particular direction, so you piqued my interest what are the reasons :)

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                Windows has AutoHotKey. That’s the only reason.

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                  There is no integrated solution like AutoHotKey for Linux but you can automate almost anything with shell scripts

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                    I had an AHK script that would toggle YouTube between 1x and 1.25x tempo and another that automatically unfaved the playing song on Spotify. AHK is really, really good.

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                      I currently am on Linux and OS-X … and AHK is without a doubt what I miss most about Windows (being able to casually play any game I want is a close second). Not only was everything doable, but it was also all relatively easy. On the Linux side, you can use xdotool and a handful of other tools, and on OS-X you can do hammerspoon and similar, but none of it feels nearly as good IMHO.

                      “Virtual desktops” – did with AHK. Fixing every annoyance I came across as quickly as I could, AHK. Even automating crazy multi-app flows easily, AHK. The app you have using stupid shortcuts you think should be changed but it doesn’t let you, AHK.

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                    I used to use Xdotool a long time back. Is AutoHotKey very different/better than this?

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                      Yep, it really is IMHO, I miss AHK most days.

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                Wow, such simple yet useful idea. Great job!

                Could you add some explicit version number to it? I’d like to have it packaged for Void Linux but we need version number for that :)

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                  Hey! Thanks! I’ll add a version number to it. You might have a naming conflicting with https://github.com/maandree/pp tho.

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                      Thank you <3

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                  It’s a bummer that most of the Lua ecosystem is stuck on 5.1 due to LuaJIT compatibility.

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                    Would you happen to know if there is any particular reason for this?? Apart from lack of time.

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                      My high-level understanding is the implementation of how integers were added in 5.3 conflicts with some of the optimizations LuaJIT does. (Also “lack of time” is a bit of an oversimplification; Mike Pall, the superhero genius author of LuaJIT is retired and there’s only one or two other humans on the planet as smart as he is.)

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                        it’s a shame I really like the focus on minimalism. Seems like the javascript hipsters that dominates the current generation never have seen a modem. I find the wastefulness of much of modern tools to be distasteful. lua is one of the best arguments that you can achieve a lot with very little.

                        Beutifully designed and fun language as well. It’s a shame to hear of the state of luajit as JIT really is necessery for the language to compete.

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                          The default interpreter is also fast (faster than Python or Ruby) and I’m using it successfully at work to parse SIP messages (well, Lua and LPEG) in real time.

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                        It’s largely due to Mike Pall (creator of LuaJIT) having a fundamental disagreement with how globals are handled in Lua 5.2 and above—the entire mechanism changed (and it affected how modules are written as well). In Lua 5.1, globals are stored in a table associated with a function (its so called “environment”), and there were two functions to manipulate this (getfenv() and setfenv() in Lua; lua_getfenv() and lua_setfenv() from C). This changed in Lua 5.2 to a local variable (technically, an “upvalue”) holding the global variables (by the name of _ENV). It may have been too much of a change to deal with it properly in LuaJIT, I don’t know as I haven’t looked into the guts of it.

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                        Why do you think this is a “bummer”? Lua 5.1 is perfectly capable, 5.2-3 have had very minor changes (unless it was something you really cared about like an integer type).

                        Granted a generational gc could be significant for long running scripts, but my impression is most lua usage is not long running scripts. That’s my impression at least.

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                          How modules work is a bit more than “very minor change” so at the time, I didn’t feel any compelling reason to even use Lua 5.2. Lua 5.3 introduced 64-bit integers and byte packing functions that were compelling enough to switch to (plus a UTF-8 module and built in boolean operators). There are some minor annoyances to deal with (mainly around module definitions and some C API changes) but I was able to get the modules I’ve written to work with Lua 5.1 through Lua 5.3 (I’m still waiting for the official release of Lua 5.4 before updating my modules).

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                            It’s not that bad but it makes more work for people who write libraries for Lua. Currently most libs support both 5.1 and 5.3. There is even library that helps in writing compatible code. It will just get harder with every breaking change in Lua.

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                              my impression is most lua usage is not long running scripts.

                              Isn’t this a bit of a circular argument? Lua isn’t used for long-running scripts because its GC isn’t that good; Lua doesn’t need a good GC because it’s not used for long-running scripts.

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                                We use long running Lua based (5.1) programs at work and we’ve had no issues with the GC. And by “long running” I mean “around six months or so between deployments [1].”

                                [1] Due to several factors we don’t move fast and break things—the SLAs and updating procedures we have with the Monopolistic Phone Company precludes doing that.

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                            I hope Mint will gain traction, it looks like great alternative for Elm. It is much simpler and allows easy js interop.

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                              I love to play VimGolf using Kakoune. While golfing is mostly entertainment, optimal solutions are usually close to „real world” usage. It’s also wildly satisfying when you manage to beat Vim in it’s own game ;)

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                                It seems that people who prefer white/light backgrounds in terminal/editors are in minority. Personally I find light background less tiring for my eyes. I use Selenized color scheme.

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                                  I do, Mastodon replaced Twitter for me. I mean I still follow people on Twitter but most of my activity is on Mastodon now. It’s smaller community but fortunately there is plenty of tech people and artists out there. My account if anyone is interested in nerdy rambling and generative art.

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                                      Personally I love Lit css. It’s work of art :)

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                                        While it’s small, it’s not a “classless” CSS framework so it’s not quite in the same ballpark of all these other frameworks. I think the whole point of the other frameworks and OP is that you just add them and you’re done.

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                                          ah, yes you are right. While most stuff will work without classes, you need at least container for good spacing.

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                                        Another alternative is Marx https://mblode.github.io/marx/.

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                                        If anyone is interested in seeing Kakoune in action, without installing it: there is website showing bunch of VimGolf challenges solved with Kakoune - Kakoune Tv. Nice thing is that every key press is explained there.

                                        Of course golfing is a bit different from normal usage (but in case of Kakoune optimal solutions are usually close to things you do every day).