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    This is really quite amazing. I am very tempted to use this sort of thing with a static website on netlify.

    Seems like a great approach for single page apps.

    Very cheap too, I would imagine.

    1. 5

      Postgrest is really good. If you’re looking for something similar that works with SQLite as well, https://github.com/jeffknupp/sandman2 might fit (although it doesn’t come with authentication modules, it does come with an auto-generated admin UI).

      1. 3

        This is great work, thank you.

        How would I go about securing an API like this, if it were to be internet-facing?

        1. 2

          Depending on your needs either nginx as a reverse proxy with basic auth or something like https://github.com/oauth2-proxy/oauth2-proxy

    1. 3

      This site was blocked by my DNS ad blocker. Is this advertising maybe?

      1. 5

        This site was blocked by my DNS ad blocker. Is this advertising maybe?

        Possibly because https://usefathom.com/ is an analytics company, and many analytics services are blocked by ad blockers? I’m not sure what domain list you’re using, but I’ve noticed the default list in uBlock Origin will sometimes block website analytics (even the privacy focused ones).

      1. 2

        This is great!

        I would so love to use something simple like this instead of github. Github has become like an Atlassian product lately.

        EDIT: Maybe make it possible to copy code out of diffs without including the +++

        1. 6

          The author dares to dictate to me their text. This is pure, unbridled arrogance – an assertion that the author’s thoughts and words are, somehow, more important than my own and deserving of being forced on me against my will! The only truly correct textual website is one which consists of a blank textarea, into which I will supply my thoughts. I realize that many people do in fact browse the web expecting to be exposed to others’ thoughts and words, but refusing to publish your own words makes your website easier to use for me, since I do not need to waste my valuable time blanking all text from your page before replacing it with the text I would have preferred.

          Yes, this is sarcastic, and yes, this parodies the attitude presented toward fonts. A user who is opinionated about font choices always has the option to universally disable sites’ ability to show any font other than the user’s preference; fonts, and every other aspect of styling, are always only suggestions, never absolute dictates, as user-agents which allow universal imposition of the user’s preference over the page author’s preference always exist.

          Thus it is not arrogance for the author of a page to suggest fonts, or other styling – rather it is arrogance for the reader of the page not to be content with the ability to say “I will automatically override your suggestion when I view this”, and instead to further demand of the author “you must never even presume to suggest!” Authors can suggest, and readers can ignore suggestions, and this is how the web ought to work. If the author of this specific page does not care for that, it appears a more amenable alternative to the web (for this author, at least) is already available to use, if perhaps not as convenient in terms of audience size.

          1. 3

            How do you go about changing the font for a website if it’s unreadable to you? Do you think the average user will know how to do this?

            1. 2

              How do you go about changing the font for a website…?

              You have multiple options. The three I’m familiar with are changing the default “sans-serif” font in your browser preferences (easy), editing your widget toolkit (gtk, Qt, etc.) config file, or adjusting fontconfig’s “sans-serif” alias (more complex).

              Do you think the average user will know how to do this?

              No. I figured this response would come up, so I addressed it in the article. See the dedicated section

            2. 2

              Edit: I updated the article to address your suggestion of global stylesheet overrides. Diff

              Thanks for the feedback. I should probably address why expecting users to globally override stylesheets is a bad idea. For instance, automatically overriding all fonts tends to break websites that use custom fonts to display icons.

              Not all websites are simple textual websites. There are times when it’s a good idea to assert branding over user preferences; I never said it was arrogant to do so. Perhaps I didn’t phrase this well.

              With Gemini and gopher, authors only send content and semantic information while user agents choose how to style it. On the Web, defaults need some slight tweaking for the site layout (and maybe a dark mode). But for textual websites, that’s enough. Tweaking the styles too much will make a website look out of place in the user’s system. This might be what you want, in which case this article doesn’t apply to you; it only applies to websites that revolve around text.

              1. 3

                This is inconsistent, though: you are wanting it to be good for users to set global preferences in one paragraph, and bad in another. You can’t have it both ways – either users should set preferences (in which case those preferences will override page authors’ suggestions), or they shouldn’t (in which case they’ll get the page author’s suggestion).

                And that’s without getting into the way you dismiss all font-family options other than serif, sans-serif, and monospace as “branding”. Authors do often have a variety of reasons for their font choices which have nothing whatsoever to do with “branding”, but you simply declare by fiat that no such reason could possibly exist.

                Consider a site like this one, for example. The author of that site has strong and informed ideas about how text and type ought to be set for web display, and they include the idea that default fonts are a sort of desperate last resort to be brought out in certain specific situations, but otherwise avoided.

                And let’s break down this comment:

                Beyond basic layout and optionally supporting dark mode, authors should not dictate the presentation of their websites; that is the job of the user agent. Most websites are not important enough to look completely different from the rest of the user’s system.

                First of all, authors do not and cannot “dictate” presentation, as I’ve already pointed out to you. They can merely offer a suggestion which will be applied as a default. And the core model of the web is a three-layered platform of content (HTML), style (CSS), and interactivity (DOM). This is not a new idea; it is how the web has been fundamentally designed for decades now. The notion that the web should be utterly unstyled save by user-agents was not a consensus view 20 years ago (I know, I was there), and isn’t today, nor should it be. Similarly, the idea that websites ought to look like “the rest of the user’s system” was a catastrophic failure, and most of the CSS features intended to make this easy were deliberately (like the “system colors” of CSS2) deprecated and removed from the standards many years ago. Not to mention, web pages which look like “the rest of the user’s system” can be actively dangerous to the user!

                All in all, you mostly seem to have immense difficulty with the idea that others might have different preferences than you do and, under the guise of “user choice”, you are essentially demanding that everyone else just switch to having your preferences. This is the only reason I can come up with for your repeated description of suggested fonts/styling/etc. as an author trying to “dictate”, or your sneering at how alternative fonts or styling are merely “branding” or some sort of assertion of personal importance.

                If you want your site to look a certain way, you can achieve that, and you have. If you want other sites to look that way, you can do that too. But to demand that others throw away their ideas of what their sites ought to look like, in service to you who already have the capability to override their styling suggestions, is the very arrogance you attribute to those other authors. My suggestion is you learn to move past it.

                Finally:

                With Gemini and gopher, authors only send content and semantic information while user agents choose how to style it.

                This specific use case seems to have reinvented the feed reader. Gopher is dead and may rest in peace; there’s no need to continue iterating on it or building gopher-alikes for what you apparently want, since feed readers will do just fine and feeds can even exist in the absence of a publicly-hyperlinkable version of the articles contained within.

                1. 1

                  I updated the article to further clarify that branding isn’t evil. Diff.

                  Thanks for the feedback.

                  1. 1

                    I never referred to “branding” as “merely branding”. Branding isn’t always bad. The branding on Practical Typography servers a good purpose. I wouldn’t characterize Practical Typography as a textual site because the visual presentation has an important connection to its content; a website about typography should show good typography.

                    First of all, authors do not and cannot “dictate” presentation, as I’ve already pointed out to you. They can merely offer a suggestion which will be applied as a default.

                    I already explained why overriding website stylesheets isn’t a great solution; the diff is in my previous comment in this thread.

                    the core model of the web is a three-layered platform of content (HTML), style (CSS), and interactivity (DOM). This is not a new idea; it is how the web has been fundamentally designed for decades now.

                    I agree that the web is not fundamentally unstyled and dictated by user agents. That’s why I explicitly stated that my advice doesn’t apply to sites that value branding or interactivity. It only applies to the subset of the web consisting of textual content that doesn’t need to be styled by authors.

                    All in all, you mostly seem to have immense difficulty with the idea that others might have different preferences than you do and, under the guise of “user choice” you are essentially demanding that everyone simply switch to having your preferences.

                    The gist of my argument is that simple sites should be styled according to user preferences, not author preferences. It seems like you’re talking to yourself.

                    This specific use case seems to have reinvented the feed reader.

                    Not all users wish to subscribe. Some are first-timers; others just stop by now and then.

                    Gopher is dead and may rest in peace; there’s no need to continue iterating on it or building gopher-alikes for what you apparently want

                    A wise man once told me, “you mostly seem to have immense difficulty with the idea that others might have different preferences than you do…you are essentially demanding that everyone else just switch to having your preferences”

                    Being unpopular is not the same as being dead; if it were, then IRC, mailing lists, gopher, Usenet, BSD on the desktop, etc. would all be dead; however, they all have passionate communities that I’d encourage you to approach with an open mind before you dismiss them. You’re welcome to be dismissive after understanding the culture of these communities. Not everyone is concerned with market share or being a good investment.

                    1. 3

                      I wouldn’t characterize Practical Typography as a textual site because the visual presentation has an important connection to its content; a website about typography should show good typography.

                      The point is that it’s someone drawing on the centuries of experience typographers/typesetters have in making text easy for readers to consume, and offering concrete informed advice to achieve that. Its advice is incredibly applicable to a “textual site”. It is about making text functionally good.

                      I already explained why overriding website stylesheets isn’t a great solution

                      If all you truly want is for the entire web to look identically “unstyled” (which really means “styled as you personally prefer”), though, overriding site styles is the way to do it. That’s why browsers nowadays all have some type of minimalist/“reader”/“distraction-free” type of alternate viewer built in, for example – it’s a feature that explicitly caters to your use case and does the hard work of unapplying styling while preserving functionality for you.

                      The gist of my argument is that simple sites should be styled according to user preferences, not author preferences.

                      Based on your comments, it appears that the only sites you consider “simple” are those which already follow your rules, which is a circular argument and raises the question of why you’d need to advocate for anyone else to also follow those rules.

                      You’re welcome to be dismissive after understanding the culture of these communities.

                      To take an example: I still use IRC on a daily basis, and have for 20-ish years. But I don’t try to make every other medium I interact with behave the same as IRC, and I don’t demand that everyone who wants to talk to me hop on IRC to do it – I also use a variety of other chat platforms and protocols to communicate with people for work or for fun, and I understand that IRC is largely in the “Netcraft confirms it” stage of existence, likely to reduce down to a much smaller user base (and really has already begun doing so) and an even smaller fraction of live chat than it makes up today. And in that sense, yes, IRC likely is, or is soon to be, dead.

                      But what you really seem to want is for everybody else to abandon what they’re doing and remake everything to suit your preference. I’m telling you you’ll likely get far more traction, and more of the end result you seem to want, from a plain-text RSS or Atom feed than you will from trying to get people to switch to Gopher, because much of what you seem to want is a reinvention of things feeds already are quite good at (and they already have significantly higher adoption among the technical audience you’re presumably writing for).

                      1. 1

                        If all you truly want is for the entire web to look identically “unstyled” (which really means “styled as you personally prefer”), though, overriding site styles is the way to do it.

                        As I explained, doing so also breaks non-textual websites. It’s better for a textual websites to obey user preferences in the first place than to have users attempt to alter websites and hope that they don’t break. Textual websites don’t need fancy styles because styles aren’t a significant part of their content.

                        Based on your comments, it appears that the only sites you consider “simple” are those which already follow your rules, which is a circular argument and raises the question of why you’d need to advocate for anyone else to also follow those rules.

                        Simple sites are sites whose content is text with the occasional image. Practical Typography is about something visual that can be reflected in its site design–fonts–so it doesn’t fit into this category. If your blog was about why the color blue is the best background color in the world, then I probably won’t be too unhappy if you set your background color to blue (as long as your color palette follows accessibility guidelines). My article describes a baseline that has exceptions. I don’t think most blogs have significant exceptions.

                        But what you really seem to want is for everybody else to abandon what they’re doing and remake everything to suit your preference.

                        What I want is for everyone to suit everyone else’s preferences.

                        I’m telling you you’ll likely get far more traction, and more of the end result you seem to want, from a plain-text RSS or Atom feed than you will from trying to get people to switch to Gopher

                        It’s possible to advocate for multiple things at the same time. This article didn’t advocate for people to switch to gopher (that line was only half-serious; maybe that wasn’t obvious enough. Perhaps I should add an emoticon or something). I’d say that the ideal text-oriented blog should contain an RSS feed AND follow these guidelines.

                        I don’t subscribe to the RSS feed for every blog I read; sometimes, I read a post in a browser. Users typically don’t subscribe to an RSS feed before they read a post or two in their browsers. Also, not all readers would like to subscribe. For example, I’m guessing that you read this article outside of your RSS reader.

                        Finally, I should clarify that I’m not trying to be as black-and-white as I may seem. Authors of “best practices” lists typically don’t expect everyone to follow them to the dot. They’re called “best practices” instead of “the only valid practices” for a reason. This list is opinionated. I’m encouraging people to follow as many of these guidelines as possible when they’re relevant, but I’m not going to be pissed off if that doesn’t happen. A website isn’t “bad” if it’s suboptimal, it just isn’t “as good as it could be”.

                        I should probably communicate that last bit better.

              1. 6

                I totally agree.

                I’ve been doing rails for years now, and it’s still just so powerful.

                I’ve spent the last day or two thinking about doing a FastAPI project, but I keep on finding new decisions I’ll have to make, like what ORM to use and how to get migrations working. I don’t want to have to think about all that, I want to create a website!

                Has anyone here gone from rails to FastAPI? I would be very interested in hearing your take.

                1. 2

                  Not used FastAPI specifically, but did have to write a simple API recently. Basically two JSON endpoints with a case statement behind one based on a parameter being sent in.

                  Spent the best part of a morning trying to get it rolling with Sinatra, small app means small framework is appropriate tool? Realised I was going in circles trying to test it. Generated a slimmed down rails api app, had the whole thing complete with end to end tests in under two hours. chefs kiss

                  1. 2

                    Haha!

                    Yeah sadly the testing is always a huge part. Like, the framework might be tiny but if I can’t write tests easily then it’s going to slow me down loads. Back to rails.

                    1. 1

                      What would be the advantage of a framework as oposed to a simple http server library and a json serializer call? It takes 5 minutes to put together.

                      1. 2

                        Not having to make decisions and glue things together. Familiarity with the framework and where things sit, other tooling just plugging in. Basically this article it turned out 😉

                        Edit: This was an application for a product launch at work, that has to work correctly or it has a massive impact on customer experience. Testing was non-optional, and for all it’s a trivial app being confident it does what we think we’re testing was important. I also have to hand it over to a team to maintain, and our other applications are using rails, so convention/patterns we use elsewhere being the same here makes jumping between the apps less jarring too.

                  1. 3

                    This site doesn’t look great on mobole, which is sadly ironic.

                    1. 1

                      Looks fine in Firefox on Android?

                      1. 1

                        Can you tell me what issues you’re having or write an issue on github or sourcehut?

                      1. 7

                        Blocking Netflix, YouTube and other streaming sites at home. Stopped me from mindlessly binge watching tv shows in the background. I still get distracted in other ways, but there’s something about TV that gets me hooked for days at a time.

                        1. 2

                          I do the same in my house. We use adguard home installed with home assistant. All news sites and social media sites are blocked during the day. The block turns off at 1900.

                          To say it has changed my life is a huge understatement

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                          Setting a reminder on my phone to tell me to “be nice” every morning.

                          It reminds me to be good to everyone, sets the tone for the day, and makes my whole family happier.

                          1. 4

                            Can someone explain to me what Tailwind CSS is? I couldn’t figure it out from their website. If it is a CSS style, why does one need npm or PostCSS? I’m really curious how I could use it for my home projects/personal website, and what it would bring me.

                            1. 2

                              If it is a CSS style, why does one need npm or PostCSS?

                              The CSS style itself is called “Utility-first CSS”. Tailwind is just one of its implementations (perhaps the first widely known). The idea is that you create CSS classes based on small utilities instead of components, so <h1 class="text-large text-blue underline">My Header</h1> instead of <h1 class="main-header">My Header</h1>. It is more verbose on the HTML side, yes, but it makes easier to refactor things on the CSS side.

                              I know that seems weird. The first time I read about utility-first CSS I wasn’t sold on it either, but I really think you should try it for yourself. Once I’ve started working with it, I enjoyed it way more than I thought I would.

                              As for the second part of your question: Tailwind is a bunch of utility CSS classes. So, for instance, you have text-black for setting the text color, border-black for setting the border color, etc. If you were to add a new color to your design system, you would need to manually create lots of these small CSS classes (say, text-fuchsia, border-fuchsia, and so on). With the preprocessor, you can just define that new color on a JSON file and Tailwind generates them all for you. Same thing for different sizes or whatelse you want to change.

                              Another useful feature that PostCSS allows you to do without much trouble is adding a prefix to all Tailwind classes. For example, instead of text-black, you can have tw-text-black, so if you’re adding Tailwind to an existing website, it doesn’t conflict with things that you already have.

                              1. 2

                                I did not know about that tailwind prefix stuff!! This means I can start using tailwind on a bootstrap project right now, without having to port the whole app over to tailwind!! Thanks!

                              2. 2

                                It’s better to watch some videos on YouTube in my opinion. Really hard to understand how it’s useful until you use it.

                                Basically it’s a utility first CSS library.

                                You need postcss to trim out the unused CSS classes, which means you end up with a very tiny amount of CSS in production.

                                1. 1

                                  My explanation might is not complete or precise… but hope it is of some help.

                                  Tailwind allows low-granularity composable declarations of styles mixed within your HTML.

                                  Here is a weird analogy…. imagine in the future – you would be able to go to a pharmacy and get medication that’s ‘pre-designed’ and ’manufactured on the fly, at the time of order – for your genome, your medical history, your current condition. Certainly, manufactures of those medications, are not going to pre-manufacture the meds for all possible combinations of people. Otherwise we would have unsolvable combinatorial explosion, of sorts. We would solve it by creating ‘utility’ chemicals that are combined in smart ways, given the input of your specific needs, at the time of your order.

                                  So tailwind allows to define a combination of say ‘fonts’, ‘font-sizes’, angles’, ‘colors’, etc – just by typing in the things you need within your HTML (or JSX ).

                                  And then during build time , by means of npm packages – it essentially creates a ‘css framework’ for your site, based on what it detected you had used in your html.

                                1. 7

                                  Pretty insulting that Microsoft are claiming they stood up for developers here. They only did anything cause the EFF contacted them.

                                  1. 7

                                    I am getting an Ergodox delivered today, so hopefully get some time to try it out and map some keys.

                                    Other than that, nothing! Probably take my daughter to the beach at some point.

                                    1. 1

                                      Congratulations! I’ve been using mine for 2 years now and I couldn’t go back to a normal keyboard for programming

                                      1. 2

                                        Thanks! I got it today and the learning curve is so steep. I’m a bit terrified tbh!

                                        Did you change the default layout? I’m not sure I can handle how far away the button to switch to symbols is :/

                                        1. 1

                                          Oh yeah, I went through about 15 iterations to get to my optimal layout. I use two layers, one for mouse keys and one for symbols. The free thumb is my symbol layer switch. Right hand becomes arrow keys/home/end/pgup/pgdown and left hand becomes symbols.

                                          1. 1

                                            I’m having problems learning the symbol layer. I was hoping to avoid having to configure the keyboard layout, but it’s looking like I might have to.

                                            1. 1

                                              The symbol layer becomes natural in a week or two. Write a bunch of C family code and it will get to be second nature fast. Printing out a reference sheet doesn’t hurt either.

                                    1. 3

                                      Rebuild personal site, do courses. I quite like this site. It’s oss too which is great.

                                      1. 2

                                        I made a static site template which I used for my personal site (andrewvos.com). Feel free to use it :) https://github.com/AndrewVos/static-site-template

                                      1. 3

                                        Really nice, I love that it uses the terminal colours.

                                        One feature of nnn that I really love is batch rename. It would be nice to show how this works in the docs.

                                        1. 2

                                          I am not sure whether this belongs in Lobsters, on the other hand:

                                          I read this long time ago, and it’s still one of the most insightful analysis of human aspects of mathematics. Another classic is On proof and progress in mathematics. Both are highly recommended.

                                          My favorite quote from “On proof and progress” (this isn’t particularly cherry-picked; the entire article is like this):

                                          Parts of this proof I could communicate in two minutes to the topologists, but the analysts would need an hour lecture before they would begin to understand it. Similarly, there were some things that could be said in two minutes to the analysts that would take an hour before the topologists would begin to get it. And there were many other parts of the proof which should take two minutes in the abstract, but that none of the audience at the time had the mental infrastructure to get in less than an hour.

                                          1. 4

                                            Have you ever read http://bentilly.blogspot.com/2010/08/analysis-vs-algebra-predicts-eating.html?

                                            Back when I was in grad school there was a department lunch with corn on the cob. Partway through the meal one of the analysts looked around the room and remarked, “That’s odd, all of the analysts are eating corn one way and the algebraists are eating corn another!” Everyone looked around. In fact everyone was eating the corn in one of two ways. One way was to munch over the length of the corn in a straight line, back up, turn slightly, and do another row across. Kind of like how an old typewriter goes. The other way was to go around in a spiral. All of the analysts were eating in spirals, and the algebraists in rows.

                                            1. 1

                                              Is that quote meant as a joke or did the analysts really eat the corn differently? Genuinely would believe both answers :)

                                              EDIT: never mind, I read the article!

                                              1. 1

                                                I must have, as it is familiar. Wow that article is now 10 years old.

                                                I wonder how algebra vs analysis interacts with Gowers’ theory vs proof method (“combinatorics”). To me both algebra and analysis seem predominantly theory-building fields, so I think two axes are orthogonal.

                                            1. 6

                                              So much of the Internet’s cultural history, transmitted only on NNTP, is being lost or forgotten.

                                              1. 8

                                                A lot of Usenet discussion was intentionally ephemeral. It was the origin of the X-No-Archive header after all.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I was thinking the same!

                                                  Though, I completely skipped the whole newsgroup thing back then. Was it big? Did people use it often?

                                                  1. 2

                                                    It was dying off as a form of active discussion in the mid to late 90s when I was using it.

                                                    It was still used to distribute binaries (and apparently still is).

                                                  2. 2

                                                    This could be applied to many forms of communication. Fragments of it do still exist on some computers, so an effort to archive could be made by participants.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    Do we really want polarising posts like these on lobsters? Seems like a hacker news kind of thing to me, and I don’t think anyone would miss the arguments.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I feel like if we restricted the site’s posts to “things unlikely to be contentious between programmers” there would be a quick decline in content…

                                                      But in all seriousness, I view things here as more tightly focused and reasoned discussions than HN, not a place where things that are broadly on-topic but controversial are off-limits. That said I think some pushback is good - I wouldn’t want the majority of posts to be so deliberately provocative.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Yeah, you make some good points. Thanks

                                                      2. 2

                                                        I was wondering whether to post it.

                                                        I did it because I found it was a good article (even if structured to be controversial) and I wanted to read informed retorts. We have some graybeard unix wizards here on Lobsters, and I thought the discussion would be good.

                                                        In any case, as @cepheus mentions, I don’t think that a restriction of controversial articles would be positive for a news site, as long as the controversy is technological and not pure drama or tech politics.

                                                      1. 8

                                                        andrewvos.com - though I mostly deleted all the content and it’s pretty empty right now

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Nifty! One note: on mobile safari, the bubbles break the swipe right to go back gesture.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            Damn. Didn’t think of that. Thanks.

                                                            I copied the animations from somewhere online, and didn’t really spend much time thinking about it. The goal is to replace it with something I’ve made myself, some time soon.

                                                          2. 2

                                                            !! I love the bubbles. This sparks joy. Does it work on mobile?

                                                            I also like the formatting of the bio page.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              It does work on mobile Firefox. I like it too, it’s pretty without being oppressive. 12 kb of compressed JS is pretty acceptable eye-candy for me.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Thanks :)

                                                                I did spend time making it as small as possible.

                                                                While building it I was contemplating how all my professional work I try to keep as small as possible, but then Marketing comes along and installs Google Tag Manager and dumps 10mb of JavaScript onto my masterpiece.

                                                              2. 3

                                                                Safari / iOS 14.1 / iP11ProMax

                                                                It definitely sparks a lot, but I can’t call it a “joy” right after I found the canvas breaking the “back” swipe gesture so I had to pull up the bottom bar and reach to back button. Also, it quite breaks the standard UX habit as I tried to scroll down through it and found bubbles instead, but this one is particularly not your fault, more like the standard issue of scrollbars absence in modern UIs.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Wow that’s really nice to hear thank you so much! Yeah it does work on mobile.

                                                                2. 1

                                                                  Love the way you wrote your bio.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Thanks I was really anxious about the way I wrote it, so that’s great to hear.

                                                                  2. 1

                                                                    Doesn’t seem to have a blog? Looks nice to me, as a portfolio site.

                                                                    In the list of “Why would you want to work with me” (first item) the word “own” is on a new line. The visual impression would be nicer if all the list elements fit in a line.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Yeah it used to have a blog then I redesigned it recently and haven’t brought all that stuff back yet.

                                                                      Thanks for the feedback I’ll take a look at that :)

                                                                  1. 9

                                                                    Learning how to type on a split ergonomic mechanical keyboard. My moonlander will finally arrive today.

                                                                    It’s also my last day at this job.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Looks like UPS lied, no keyboard until monday :(

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        I just bought the EZ yesterday, super excited! What made you choose the moonlander? It was a really hard choice for me but in the end I didn’t like that you can’t replace all the buttons on the moonlander

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          The moonlander has more firmware storage space. That and the left side is active so I can use the left side for gaming.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            That’s pretty cool about the gaming thing. Was quite tempted by that and now I’m wondering if I made a mistake. That thing would be perfect for gaming!!

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              The EZ is also good for gaming. If you needed more mouse space, you could always move the right keyboard forward on your desk. If you end up moving your keyboard layout around, I recommend having a “gaming layout.” For instance, I moved escape to where caps lock is and would accidentally hit it when gaming sometimes, so on my gaming layout, I moved it back to the top left corner.

                                                                              The Ergodox EZ was easily one of my favorite “expensive and unnecessary” purchases of the last few years. I have had mine for 2+ years and still enjoy the experience of typing on it.

                                                                              Here is my layout https://configure.ergodox-ez.com/ergodox-ez/layouts/zbOVO/latest/0 It is not universally perfect or even internally consistent, but it is perfect for me. If you use vim, having an easy to trigger layer with vim arrow keys is amazing. The mouse layer is also surprisingly nice.

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                                                                                Thanks for this, I was a bit nervous about spending so much money on this keyboard, but you’ve made me feel a lot better about my purchase.

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                                                                          Awesome! Good luck, hard at first, but definitely worth it! Is it orthogonal? (too lazy to lookup on phone)

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                                                                            It’s ortholinear yeah

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                                                                            Exciting! I’m still waiting for my Moonlander to ship (should be between now and 6th of November) and I’m eagerly awaiting it. (My RSI is holding me back as more of my work is about writing plans and proposals now, but pain in my fingers and wrists cause me to dread typing. I’m also unable to play Minecraft with my son, other than at holidays. I hope the Moonlander should help with both.)

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                                                                              Same here on the split keyboard. I’ve found it pretty tough going due to moving from a standard layout straight to split, tented, vertically offset and a slightly different layout all at once.

                                                                              I’ve decided to make it a little easier on myself by removing some of the distance between halves, lowering the outwards tilt, and mapping some keys back to where I expect them.

                                                                              I have previously managed pretty well with two mini Apple keyboards (whose layouts I’m used to) set up as if they’re one split keyboard, with tenting. This makes me think it’s mainly the layout change that’s making it hard to get up to speed.

                                                                              My usual WPM is 80+, and I’m down to a sorry 13 at the moment. I’m not sure this tells the full story, however, as most of the slowdown is coming from the changed positions of the non-alphanumeric keys and the fact I’m now forced to touch type properly: no cheating (by reaching over to the ‘wrong’ side) possible.

                                                                              I’m going to keep doing typing tutors until my WPM is back at 60+ and then focus on the punctuation so I can use tools without having to look at a picture to remember where pipe, at, ampersand etc. are!

                                                                              BTW for anyone thinking of getting a keyboard which is supported by QMK: The software is absolutely brilliant. I was a bit worried about flashing but it was smooth and painless, and the configurator takes only a few minutes to learn (read the docs!) and is really easy to use.

                                                                              Being able to have the keyboard send out the key codes I want rather than having to rely on software (Karabiner Elements) is also fantastic.

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                                                                              nnn for me! It’s a great little file manager. Once you get used to using 1/2/3/4 you’ll love it. Also, batch rename is a masterpiece.

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                                                                                Trying it out now. The plugin architecture is going to be huge for me. I can work with files by creating my own plugins to do what I need. Then, I can start to chain them together and start building actual software without knowing what I’m building before hand.

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                                                                                I just want to point out that planting trees is the worst kind of CO2 compensation.

                                                                                • Young trees don’t absorb as much CO2 as old ones
                                                                                • Planting trees does not actually change the fact that we are emitting too much CO2.
                                                                                • There are not a general solution in the sense that everyone could just compensate with trees and everything is fine

                                                                                It is better to compensate via an investment in green and sustainable projects

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                                                                                  I just want to point out that planting trees is the worst kind of CO2 compensation.

                                                                                  The benefits of the tree are for tomorrow not today and aren’t purely for CO2 sequestration. You also reduce/mitigate things like desertification, help change local climate, provide future nesting area for birds etc…

                                                                                  Don’t let a good thing like planting trees stop you from doing so because it alone won’t fix CO2. We need multi pronged approaches. And given how many trees are dying now due to fires, I can’t get behind not trying to plant more to fix the after effects of us not dealing with CO2 in the atmosphere.

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                                                                                    I disagree. While planting a few trees won’t have an immediate effect, it has a few nice properties:

                                                                                    1. It’s easy: provided you have a sapling and a shovel you can do it. Or even easier, donate to something like Trees for all and have somebody else do it at a much larger scale.
                                                                                    2. We can do it today
                                                                                    3. It benefits nature as a whole, e.g. by providing nesting space for birds
                                                                                    4. It’s probably the least prone to corruption, misuse of funds, or some other form of “damage” to others.
                                                                                    5. Provided they are taken care for (or just left alone), a forest can last for more or less forever (at least here in The Netherlands where we don’t have massive wildfires and what not). I think wind turbines only last 2-3 decades or so.

                                                                                    Of course there are far more effective ways, such as banning cars and massive investments in public transportation. But these methods tend to be very political, take years to complete, usually are horribly expensive, and may be prone to misuse.

                                                                                    A random recent example: a wind park was built in The Netherlands, with enough energy to provide 300k-something homes with electricity. The Dutch government invested something like €600 million, with the promise that locals would get (IIRC) a discount. This would be a huge benefit for the environment, as a few birds flying into a wind turbine is worth saving tons of CO2.

                                                                                    Except it all went to a (newly built) data centre from Microsoft. All of it. This in spite of The Netherlands lagging behind massively when it comes to adopting renewable energy sources.

                                                                                    For reference, that €600 million would’ve been enough for roughly 96 000 trees according to the Trees for All website. The exact amount of CO2 this can store is hard to calculate. A statistic I found on a few websites is roughly 20KG of CO2 per tree per year. At 96 000 trees that would translate to 1 920 000 KG (2 116 tons) of CO2 per year.

                                                                                    Of course it would’ve been even better to just give the wind park to citizens as originally intended, but this is just an example to show that planting trees can be very effective.

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                                                                                      Provided they are taken care for (or just left alone), a forest can last for more or less forever (at least here in The Netherlands where we don’t have massive wildfires and what not). I think wind turbines only last 2-3 decades or so.

                                                                                      Not only in the netherlands, but pretty much everywhere. While still natural events, most present days wildfires, or at least their scale, are very much a result of replacing naturally occurring forest with vast areas of monoculture of trees for wood production purposes. Covering thousands of acres with pines, spruces and eucalyptus in places like south europe, south africa or california is essentially turning land into a gigantic fuse. Before man-made forests, such trees had to share the space with leafy trees such as oak, chestnut, acer, birch, cherry, etc. These are not only less flammable themselves, they also provide thicker shadow, retaining more humidity and allow for less flammable smaller plants to grow below their canopy.

                                                                                      You also forgot a very important plus for trees: their impact on human life quality. Few things are more therapeutic than taking a walk on a quite forest. And even in the city or indoors, humans naturally need proximity with nature.

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                                                                                      But it doesn’t hurt, right? If we would plant as much as we cut, we’d still help a lot – or this wouldn’t hold?

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                                                                                        Yes, a small amount. See https://savingnature.com/offset-your-carbon-footprint-carbon-calculator/, then multiply the results by a few billion people per year.

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                                                                                        Not only that, but most of these “we plant trees for you” operations are planting tree farms that would have been planted anyways. They’re also monocultures that don’t support ecosystems the way a real forest would, but I think people get this image of a proper forest when they hear about these things—and it ain’t so.

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                                                                                          It’s not the best but it’s certainly not the worst. It ranks higher in CO2 reduction than buying a carbon offset for example.

                                                                                          What most companies don’t realise is that it’s not enough to be carbon neutral, they need to be carbon negative and actively reduce the level of CO2 rather than maintain it. The heating effects of elevated CO2 are cumulative.

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                                                                                            Thanks I didn’t know this.

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                                                                                              Edit: this is in reply to GP.

                                                                                              Obviously, the need to plant trees arises from the fact that we have destroyed huge areas of forest and woodland already and should try to re-establish the balance of co2 absorption.

                                                                                              Literally every single old tree has been a young tree once. You need to plant trees and let them grow old. By your logic there could never be any benifit of planting a tree, carbon wise. You don’t need to cut down an old tree to plant a new one. An old tree plus a young tree abdorve more co2 than the old one alone. I am not sure what you are trying to point out with your first bullet point.

                                                                                              Although I absolutely agree with your second and third point. And that applies to most modern “solutions”. There is this idea that we just switch do PV panels, or electric cars or plant a bunch of trees and everything is fine. While the problem is much more deep rooted in the very concept of our current modern society.

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                                                                                                I totally agree, but the conservation and planting of trees and the compensation of everyone‘s CO2 emissions are two different problems in my opinion. I cant just hit a stranger in the face and pay the medical bills.

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                                                                                                  Yes, I think it’s clear that both these problems should be worked on. Too much CO2, and too little trees.

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                                                                                              We have too many trees here. You can adopt some of them