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    Pixel 2 XL, the size is immense but it makes up for it with its immense battery life, despite over 2 years of daily use still lasts over a day. The support is indeed a big issue, finishing in October this year less than 3 years after I purchased it. Not sure where I’m going after this.

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      I use Route53 and am happy, its pretty well featured but does lack some more modern features seen on CloudFlare and the like. It’s super cheap.

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        I don’t host my email, because I think it’s too much of a risk. Email should always work, period. With a self hosted environment I can’t assure that.

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          That’s exactly why I do self-host. If you rely on somebody like Google, you’re at their mercy as far as what actually gets through or not.

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            You’re always going to be at the mercy of 3rd parties when running your email. If your IP ends up on a blocklist you’re doomed, every provider will blackhole your email. You’re one person, you’ll struggle massively to get it lifted, if at all - meanwhile your email is being blackholed. Google end up on a blocklist, they’ve huge leverage and will have it fixed instantly.

            Email operates on trust, its really hard to gain trust when you’re one person with no history. Especially when you don’t even own the IP space, so you’re relying on the trust of your untrustworthy ISP members.

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              That’s my point. Google and other providers are silently blocking incoming emails. I’d rather be in charge of what gets through to me. Of course you’re always at the mercy of third parties regardless, but self-hosting makes it one less.

              By the way, I have a side-project that sends several thousand emails everyday. I’ve had to deal with blocklists a few times, but it’s really not that bad. It’s also trivial to switch outgoing IP addresses.

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                I agree. I’ve recently noticed that Google is being way too aggressive in dropping the mail, including from some mailing lists, not to mention the private domains.

                As for your second point — apparently, I actually have had my domain name itself blocked by Gmail, expectedly due to sending myself some lists of domains through crontab, so, I’ve actually had to switch my domain for outgoing mail for now.

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            When self-hosting, you at least have access to logs. You can see, if other side greylisted you or accepted mail immediately. Mail service providers are hiding all kind information, both about incoming and outgoing connections. I have self hosted my email long-long time, over 15 years. Sometimes there is little bit trouble, but nothing too serious. Most practical advice: don’t use well known cheap VPS providers. Those IP-s are bad neighbourhood, most problems with delivery are going from that.

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            I don’t expect much from my text editors, and I don’t like mods/plugins that are too invasive. So, my vim config is pretty sparse:

            syntax on
            colorscheme koehler
            set number
            set mouse=a
            set autoread
            map <C-O> <ESC>:w<CR>
            map <C-X> :q!<CR>
            set colorcolumn=80
            autocmd VimLeave *.go :!go fmt
            

            Basically, show line numbers, show me the 80 character width boundary, enable some syntax highlighting, and let me save and close using CTRL-O and CTRL-X, respectively (yes, it’s a remnant of my younger days when I used nano). I program in Go a lot, so the last line is to run the code formatter whenever I exit a file with the “.go” suffix

            EDIT: The following is just a commentary on me. I’m not suggesting any of it is a relatable developer experience for others, and I don’t suggest it’s the “right” way or “wrong” way to do anything.

            It’s probably worth mentioning why I don’t expect much from my editor, mostly because I’d like to hear y’all’s thoughts on the matter as well. The reason I don’t expect much from my editors is because I don’t ever want my editor messing with the way content is presented. I don’t want it collapsing functions, I don’t want it making code completion suggestions, I don’t want it collapsing comments, I don’t want it replacing symbols (like lambda or square root), etc.

            Every time I open a file, I see every printable byte of it, and it’s a constant memory refresher of either where code is located and/or how it’s implemented. You’ll notice that my vim config only contains directives that affect things around the code (i.e. line numbers, 80 character boundary). I read the code raw, I write the code raw, I debug the code raw. I think that always seeing all the code ultimately helps me understand the codebase better and leads to me writing better code.

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              map <C-O> <ESC>:w<CR>
              map <C-X> :q!<CR>

              Do you know about ZZ ?

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                I don’t think so. What is that?

                1. 2

                  Write and quit.

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                I would add filetype plugin indent on, use non-recursive mappings for single mode only, and use proper 'equalprg' with formatting before save, not on closing Vim.

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                  I have literally no idea what any of that means or why I would do any of that

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                    map is recursive (which mean that 2 mappings map a b and map b c will cause a to work like c, which can be unexpected) and non-mode-specific (which mean that it works in normal, visual, select, and operator-pending modes). It is better to use non-recursive mode-specific mappings, which in this case is probably nnoremap which will cause for example that if one day you decide to swap : and ; then these mappings will still work.

                    'equalprg' is program that will be used to filter provided input when = command is used, more info can be found in help :h = and :h 'equalprg'.

                2. 2

                  autocmd VimLeave *.go :!go fmt

                  That will clobber the buffer if the file isn’t valid Go, right? Doing that on VimLeave seems awkward since you can’t actually correct it (as Vim will exit)?

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                    No, it will not, as this only run command, not filter the content (to filter it would need to be :%!go fmt /dev/stdin).

                    1. 1

                      Ah yeah, so it’s just so that you can see an error on invalid syntax when you exit Vim?

                1. 2

                  See also https://github.com/jschauma/jass which is on similar lines.

                  1. 1

                    You may also be interested in age, which is in the process of being written by a cryptography engineer at Google.

                  1. 2

                    Okay, I’m still a student, but can someone explain this one?

                    Free software is free.

                    If it’s GPL, they have to provide the source. Is he referring to the fact that you can charge money for it, like Red Hat does? You can still use CentOS, which is free RHEL.

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                      The point is that the author wanted to seem smart so they couldn’t just say “Using free software costs labor time”

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                        Yes, this is exactly what it seems to mean. Confusing to use two different meanings of the word free in the same sentence.

                        1. 1

                          And re-phrasing the point as “using free software costs labor time” is still misleading - all software costs labor time, regardless of whether or not it is free! For some applications, the free software that is readily available is less polished or requires more work to set up than equivalent non-free software might be, and that’s probably what the author had in mind when he wrote the list. But that’s not actually the same claim as “free software isn’t free” and I don’t think that claim is accurate as stated anyway - in some applications, free software is easier to use and requires less labor time than equivalent non-free software. And this is ignoring concerns such as proprietary software being less time consuming to use for a time, until suddenly the software owner decides they don’t care about supporting your use case, or decide to bar you from using the software for political reasons, or any other consequence of lacking software freedoms that makes putting proprietary software to use in a given situation harder or impossible. You could just as easily say “proprietary software isn’t free” if you wanted to argue a point from a pro-free-software perspective, and what this is really telling us is that a pithy one-liner like that isn’t enough text to discuss the actual pros and cons of using free software for a particular application.

                          1. 5

                            Dismissing the common problem case of free software generating additional labor over their non-free counterparts because “all software requires labor time!”…“there are exceptions to your generalization!” is really wishy-washy and dismissive of a problem…for people that care about the economic efficiency of your software. I mean I don’t care because I’m not an entrepreneur business undergrad constantly concerned about minmaxing labor time and I just think writing software is fun but still at least understand the perspective

                        2. 7

                          The long-term costs of keeping a system running can be substantially higher than the initial purchase price.

                          Here are some additional factors that should be considered in a corporate environment:

                          • Operational costs - Do we know how to support and monitor this system? How many people understand it? How steep is the learning curve? Do we already have a boring solution to this problem?
                          • Maintenance costs - Are there recurring license fees? Is the API stable? How frequently is the system updated? How difficult is it to keep our documentation updated?
                          • Licensing - Have the license(s) been reviewed? Does using this system expose us to liability?
                          • Security - Does the system have regular security audits?
                          • Compliance - Does the system and all of its dependencies comply with GDPR, CCPA, or other requirements? Can we guard against ethical conflicts?
                          • Business Continuity - Does the vendor know how to recover from a disaster? Do we?
                          • Support - How responsive is vendor support? Do we know how to work with them? Do they have offices in the US?
                          • Training - Are books and/or courses available?
                          • Enhancement - Is the system being enhanced and tested on newer OSes? Linux, macOS, Office 365, and Windows are all moving targets.
                          • Popularity - Is the system popular? Are third-party experts available? Does it make money for the vendor?
                          • Dependencies - Does the system depend on third-party services? What is the relationship like between the vendor and these parties? Do we have to assemble a working solution from a number of components?
                          • Cloud - Can we store our data on premises or in our preferred cloud service?
                          • Reputation - Do we trust this vendor? Have we worked with them successfully in the past? What is their reputation like in the industry?
                          • Reporting - Can we obtain usage information? Is there a reporting API?
                          1. 2

                            It’s a bit of a lemon market and accurate assessment is incredibly difficult. Being upfront about limitations of a product or its support doesn’t pay off, because for one vendor who’s honest about it there’s another who just keeps silent, and people tend to assume it can do it all.

                            There are also many ways to be technically compliant with statements like 24/7 support. and one may discover that only when their system breaks on a friday midnight.

                            1. 2

                              Most legal IT professionals are members of ILTA and we all have similar technology stacks. It is common to ask other ILTA members what they think of a product. Most of the time people will respond by email but sometimes you will be asked to call someone. If you overstate the capabilities of your product then there is a significant chance that word will get around. We still have a lot of crummy software but word of mouth is surprisingly helpful.

                          2. 3

                            I can interpret that statement multiple ways, I suspect the leading candidate for myself would be that whilst software might be free in upfront monetary cost, it can sometimes end up costing you working around bugs, or maintaining it etc and you might have been better off paying for a piece of software instead. Just because its free doesn’t mean it’s better.

                          1. 5

                            From UPDATING:

                            The sidebar patch has been merged. Please watch for airborne bovine. See the documentation for all the options, or simply enable it with ‘set sidebar_visible’.

                            Wow, who would’ve thought the sidebar would finally make it into core mutt? First PowerShell open sourced and now this - what other surprises await us today? :)

                            PS: why will cows be flying?

                            1. 3

                              Flying cows? Slow down there, we still have to get Tesla to produce solar powered roofs first. And that Jenkins UI really needs some improvements, too…

                                1. 1

                                  Wow, thank you! This looks really great.

                              1. 1

                                Turns out that Debian has been shipping mutt with the sidebar patch for over eight years now. I did not know that!

                                1. 3

                                  It’s quite commonly available - pkgsrc, Homebrew and the OpenBSD ports tree also have it, amongst others (NeoMutt too). It’s annoying having it out-of-tree though as it’s something that’s quite frequently broken by a new Mutt release.

                              1. 4

                                This week, I’ve decided to start learning about how FPGAs are implemented and then attempt to implement a small FPGA in Chisel (and then run the FPGA - on an FPGA!). Reading the literature could take quite a bit of time, though.

                                Also, this is the last week in which this thread will be posted by bot. I haven’t been able to find anything else to do with the VPS that the bot was running on, so I’ve shut it down. In the future, I will post the threads manually.

                                1. 2

                                  Happy to host the bot for you?

                                  1. 2

                                    Sure. I’ll add some documentation to the README on how to get it set up.

                                    1. 1

                                      OK, please contact me (details on profile, email/IRC/twitter, whatever you prefer) me once done - I’ll be happy to host it, effectively zero cost to me.

                                      1. 1
                                        1. 1

                                          OK, understood, no more lobsterbot.

                                  2. 1

                                    In the last few years the capabilities of FPGA’s have exploded. Moore’s law are driving them harder than anything else on the planet.

                                    I’ve been tinkering with a Cyclone V set up and learning about them. Amazing potential.

                                    1. 3

                                      Looks like you’re new here (welcome!), so you probably haven’t seen the Cyclone V tutorials I posted in January.

                                      http://zhehaomao.com/project/2014/01/02/fpga-series.html

                                      If you have any questions about the Cyclone V, feel free to ask me.

                                      1. 1

                                        No, I didn’t see that. Looks good. Bookmarked!

                                    1. 1

                                      That’s the logo, much the way Hacker News has Y for YCombinator. Lobsters has L.

                                      1. 3

                                        I think the OP means, why is it red sometimes and black others.