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    I started on a website but only recently learned about mvc and other frameworks. So I’m going to be redoing my site. But mvc is so hard…

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      Get a good Rails or Django book (or similar), type out all the examples by hand, and don’t stop moving forward each day until you’re done. You’ll understand MVC soon if you just stick with it. I find books are the best way to learn because they’re comprehensive and don’t make too many assumptions about what you already know. Keep at it!

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        You’re right. I only started learning to code less than a year ago. I can do html and css and enough php to get started. Thing is I got arrogant and thought coding was a piece of cake. Til I heard about frameworks and took a peek at lobsters code. It was humbling. Now I’m going to continue with the books. Thanks!

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      I’m in the second week of a new job! After a nine-month stint as a manager at Knewton, and a longer stint as a kind of evangelist-blogger-coder-mentor-hybrid…thing at Fog Creek, I’m back to being a developer full time at Khan Academy. And I don’t know entirely what I’ll be doing specifically; right now, I’ve been dusting off my JS knowledge, diving into the website, and maybe today trying to learn enough Android or iOS development to knock off a minor feature or two there. It’s exciting to be relearning everything after awhile off.

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        Congrats on getting back into hacking full-time. I did that about 1.5 years ago after being a PM and it’s super fun, you’ll enjoy it even more than you used to. Also Khan Academy is totally awesome!!!

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          update your lobsters “about” blurb :P I’ve gotten the impression through various channels that KA is a wonderful place

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            Heh, updated it. Thanks for the reminder. And so far it definitely is wonderful.

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          Not sure what the Lobsters norm is, re-pasting the comment I wrote on his site in case it’s valuable here…

          Very interesting. I’m not super well versed in it, but this might be an interesting read for you: http://www.jonathanleighton.com/articles/2012/poltergeist-0-6-0/

          Poltergeist is a WebKit-based headless browser used to test Rails web apps (including testing JavaScript functionality). It’s a WebKit-based replacement for Selenium. The author of Poltergeist added a pretty impressive feature: when you’re running automated tests, if a JavaScript error occurs, Poltergeist will drop you to a WebKit debug session with the breakpoint at the line that failed. This is extremely useful, as the old way was “show me the screenshot of what it looked like failing!”

          Now I’m wondering what other applications could exist if Chome Dev Tools were more portable. Nice work, keep exploring!

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            Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. On Audible. I’m about halfway through and it’s awesome so far. Talks a lot about biology, ancient humans, politics, money, and empires.

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              I don’t understand why Elasticsearch is hardly ever mentioned as a document store. If you’re going off RDBMS it’s normally because you need to denormalize some data into documents for more complicated querying. Elasticsearch can store denormalized JSON and index/query in powerful ways. Canonical data = RDBMS. Denormalized data for complicated querying: Elasticsearch.