1. 1

    That brings back memories of university 15 years ago and sharing a single DSL modem between 4 roommates who were all computer nerds. The poor modem started dropping packets if we tried to work it too hard and after much finger pointing we eventually agreed to each limit ourselves to some percentage of available bandwidth with wondershaper. It probably saved our friendship, if not preventing us from murdering one another.

    1. 4

      The fact of the matter is, there is no replacement for YouTube. Unfortunately I’m still a regular YouTube user.

      I don’t know if this counts as a real YouTube replacement, but watching YT videos thru https://invidio.us has fewer privacy issues.

      1. 3

        A number of the YouTube producers I follow have started also posting to lbry.tv, so it is possible to give GOOG at least one or two fewer clicks a week! EEVBlog and Veritasium, to name a few of the bigger ones.

        1. 1

          I’ve yet to find any streamers I watch be interested in LBRY. The uphill battle they’ve gotta solve is monetization.

      1. 1

        Some of the early AWS product releases might have fit the Socratic label, had we thought to use it. They almost always featured an FAQ as the main documentation link. The (usually less than 10) questions tended to introduce the intended use case and build towards an example implementation. They also were clever in sneakily steering you away from parts of the API that were tricky or incomplete, but it was marketing copy, I suppose. Overall it wasn’t a bad format for an intro doc, but I suspect they let the actual API spec get released at a lower quality in hopes nobody would read that far.

        1. 1

          Reading this gave me an epiphany. Back when I studied CS at Georgia Tech in ‘98, we learned these tools along the way as we wrote our code. Why? Because there was no alternate. There simply wasn’t a way other than the shell and vi and make and rcs when your dev environment was a pair of aging SunOS servers named Oscar and Felix that were shared by a few hundred people. My last two decades of hiring junior engineers have been marked by the frustration of having to weigh the balance of a candidate’s code and design and architecture skills against their decreasing knowledge of practical systems skill. I always assumed it was a decline in the competence of universities, but now I suspect that as computing professionals we have done ourself a disservice by not being more self-aware about the actual process of software stewardship.

          1. 1

            Yikes, that page totally won’t load without 3rd party scripts turned on.

            1. 4

              Any lobsters planning on putting a Librem 5 in their claws? Would love to hear more about it.

              1. 9

                I backed it, but I’ve been continually thinking about unbacking it. As much as I want to like what they’re doing, there’s a lot I’ve not been impressed with (e.g. poor release communication, their handling of the librem.one service); I’ve been on the fence. Even after reading this, I have no idea what year my device will ship in. It reads like they’re slipping deadlines again, but don’t want to come out and say that. We’ll see, I guess.

                1. 2

                  Same on both counts. I also had a poor experience with a Librem notebook that I ended up returning; that soured me on their products in general.

                2. 11

                  Ordered mine… looking forward to it.

                  I guess I’m way too literal a person. I read licences. I read words and expect them to mean something.

                  People have been trained if they see an “I Accept” button, you click it and carry on.

                  It causes me mental anguish every damn time.

                  I’m just not the sort of person who can blindly do that.

                  I loathe “I Accept” buttons.

                  I think a lot of people have a mindset “Purism is free software, it should be cheaper and higher spec’d hardware”,

                  They forget usually phones are heavily subsidized by the network providers so they can lock you in and load you up with shitware and spyware and strap you down with EULA’s.

                  Yes, the privacy part will be a very nice to have. I want that.

                  But not nearly as much as I don’t want the lock in and shitware and spyware and EULA’s.

                  Not nearly as much as I want to be able to tinker and improve and feed my improvements into the ecosystem.

                  Not nearly as much as I want the acceptance and expectation from the people I pay my money to that…

                  I AM gROOT!

                  1. 3

                    o/ here!

                    Backed their crowdfunder back … when? 2017? I plan on redeeming one from one of the later batches, so the review will takes some time still. Until then, my Nexus 5 will do fine.

                    1. 1

                      o7 to you who still uses the Nexus 5. I used mine until late 2017 when I picked up a Pixel. I’m on a Pixel 3 now and can’t imagine using a N5 still.

                      1. 1

                        I’m still using mine. It, uh… works?

                        I mean, it’s a mobile device, so I don’t expect it to be pleasant, but once I got ublock origin installed it became pretty tolerable.

                    2. 1

                      I pre-ordered one way back when they had the crowdfund. I find this tiered release rather confusing, TBH. But it’s good that they’re finally starting to ship!

                      1. 1

                        I pre-ordered a few months ago. I wasn’t sure I’d use it enough to justify the cost (I seriously doubt it’ll cover everything I want in a daily driver device) but I decided it was worth it, because it’s something I want to see exist, so given I can afford it, I should support it. The Google/Apple mobile duopoly we currently have isn’t a great situation, so more competition (even in a very niche form) is welcome. I’m still sad about the Palm Pre, to be honest!

                        However, this shipping announcement really rankled. Another 6-10 months to get a phone with a case that fits? I appreciate that they’re offering to bump people down the list, and I’ll definitely take them up on it if needed, but it feels quite disingenuous to claim “we hit our deadline” with this sort of half-baked rollout. I’m considering asking for a refund and judging the final result before committing to it now.

                        1. 1

                          I was moments away from putting down for one, but then I checked the specs on the modem and backed out. The set of supported LTE bands was spotty enough that I couldn’t see myself using this overseas or even on certain domestic carriers without constantly fighting reception issues.

                          1. 1

                            I preordered one at the beginning of the year and just got an email from Librem with effectively the same information as this blog post, promising more info in a few weeks.

                          1. 15

                            halving memory usage is great! but still needing 500M for a chat client? sorry, but that is still nearly an order of magnitude too much.

                            also, when they deployed these changes, the web UI broke in one of my browsers and noticeably slowed down. :/

                            1. 2

                              A note on the “magnitude”: Quassel with a load of channels uses 104MB RES here. Sure, 50 would be nicer, but I wouldn’t say I see a real problem here. Or is 100 still in the same magnitude as 50? ;)

                              And yes, I also hate that it uses 500. Especially for people who only use 1 slack server/team, there’s literally no advantage :(

                            1. 2

                              whoah, DCI over USB looks really, really handy.

                              1. 2

                                just pops out almost a dozen empty tabs for me. cute idea, though!

                                1. 2

                                  strongly suggest giving it a try. the 3-pane layout and directional navigation clicked in my head so instantly and efficiently that I was blown away when I discovered it.

                                  even better is using ranger from within vim for file navigation. it has almost become second nature over buffer explorer unless a project has a particularly ugly directory layout.

                                  1. 2

                                    I suppose the possible upshot of this is some new adoption and support of F-Droid. I’ll admit that some of my small app teams have been fighting mightily to keep up with GOOG’s new release criteria for the Play store, so they really aren’t making any friends amongst devs lately, either.

                                    1. 1

                                      every now and then I’ll replicate a component or two from the Android apps I maintain and so far the flutter equivalents have dog slow refresh rates compared to the native implementations and fewer features. I think the idea is cool, but they have a long way to go.

                                      1. 8

                                        It depends largely on how many network interfaces you need. If this box will be your firewall/router too, the APU2 board https://www.pcengines.ch/apu2.htm ticks all of these boxes:

                                        • 3x independent gigabit interfaces
                                        • 64-bit x86 CPU with AES-NI instructions (which lets you run any Linux/BSD your heart desires)
                                        • cheap
                                        • small
                                        • low-power
                                        • fanless
                                        • hacker-friendly

                                        If you only need 1 network interface, then the sky is the limit. Virtually any used x86-64 hardware manufactured in the last decade can work, so hit up your friends and family for their old netbooks and whatnot. If you want to buy new, there are Intel NUCs, NUC knock-offs, Chinese-made embedded systems on Amazon (one brand name of these is QOTOM), low-power ATX mobo+CPU combos off of Newegg, old chrome boxes, the new $35 Atomic Pi.

                                        And those are just the x86 options. If speed is not super important, the Raspberry Pi can work okayish. There are some pretty decent higher-powered ARM devices on the market now, especially in the $50-$100 price range. If I was to buy one of those, I would try to get one supported by Armbian: https://www.armbian.com/

                                        1. 2

                                          I currently have the old ALIX board which has the advantage of power over ethernet which is missing from the APU2 boards.

                                          1. 1

                                            +1 for the APU line of stuff. initial setup over serial can be a pain, but they are uniquely capable and well made.

                                            1. 1

                                              If you only need 1 network interface, then the sky is the limit. Virtually any used x86-64 hardware manufactured in the last decade can work, so hit up your friends and family for their old netbooks and whatnot. If you want to buy new, there are Intel NUCs, NUC knock-offs, Chinese-made embedded systems on Amazon (one brand name of these is QOTOM), low-power ATX mobo+CPU combos off of Newegg, old chrome boxes, the new $35 Atomic Pi.

                                              That’s a great point. I’ve seen old Intel Atom NUCs around $50 on eBay, those might fit the bill.

                                            1. 4

                                              I so, so badly want to support Purism or System 76, but until they can support usb-c charging, I fear I’m stuck with my Dell XPSs.

                                              1. 1

                                                Why?

                                                1. 6

                                                  I don’t have a usb-c laptop yet, but I’m requiring it in the future for a few reasons:

                                                  • I can buy a 3rd party power adapter and as long as it supports usb-c PD at the wattage I need, that’s all I need to know.
                                                  • I can separate the cable from the charger, helping for packing. Or dealing with replacing a bad cable (my macbook charger cable eventually frayed after a few years).
                                                  • There’s a higher probability I can use someone else’s charger (e.g. apple switched to usb-c)
                                                  • There’s some amazingly small 65W chargers coming out leveraging power supply advances (GaN, High-Freq conversion designs) that just happen to support usb-c. Finsix started with the dart-c (seemingly discontinued), other competitors are now out.
                                                  • I could theoretically buy a lighter laptop with a smaller battery and pack a usb-c battery pack for the times I really need the extra weight / battery life.
                                                  • You can sometimes trickle charge from an traditional usb-a port (e.g. when on a plane / in a car) with the right adapter.
                                                  • Theoretically pack fewer cables/chargers if you have multiple usb-c devices (phone, camera, etc).
                                                  1. 6

                                                    I think with the arrival of the USB-DRM there is a high chance that you might end up having USB C without any of the benefits you listed.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Fair point, looks like some hp laptops already have some drm affecting charging.

                                                    2. 2

                                                      Is the USB C charger world that standardised? I don’t use any device with C, and I’m suspicious of the idea of companies playing nice together when it comes to power supplies.

                                                      From what I’ve read the headphone part of the C world is a shamble of incompatibility (with accusations of it being intentional). Why wouldn’t they do the same for chargers?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Mostly. HP laptops are the only ones I know that only use HP chargers.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          You’re right. Most of the laptop vendors with usb-c seem to follow Power Delivery spec, but that doesn’t necessarily mean a device has to accept a charging profile with a lower power or different output voltage. Which is reasonable.

                                                          And then there’s Qualcomm which has usb-c chargers (usually for phones) that aren’t following PD and instead has their own ‘quickcharge’ protocol instead.

                                                      2. 1

                                                        I just can’t imagine going back to the world where there is a mismatched tangle of cables on my desk that are all mutually incompatible, or having to lug chargers from room to room or office to home. I love that I can trust that most offices and homes will have a charger I can just use. but most of all, I struggle to carry too much weight on my back, so every gram of charger brick I don’t have to carry is a lifesaver.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          There is another way :)

                                                          I run an old ThinkPad with FreeBSD, and have a few docking stations for it: one for home, one for the office, one for my current client’s office. Old ThinkPad gear is cheap - the priciest of the docking stations cost me $50.

                                                          This way it’s even easier than cables and hubs - just sit down, press laptop onto docking station, beep, done. When it’s time to leave, suspend, close the lid, press the eject button, slip laptop in bag.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I have 8-10 of the old barrel-style thinkpad chargers scattered in various corners of my house and in bags ready to go. Throwing that all away for USB-C sounds awful but I suppose it’s going to have to happen at some point.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Sounds like your setup is similar to mine. I also have three of the cheaper X-series (also barrel-era) for the kids; I’d much rather they use a ‘real’ computer running Linux than iPads or similar.

                                                              I’m going to have to switch at some point. Still unsure when, and to what, though. Most likely is a newer generation of X-series.

                                                            2. 1

                                                              ah, I should have been more clear - my goal is to not add any more proprietary cables or docks. I (and everyone I know) have USB-C cables in our homes and offices and purses. it seems a step backwards to buy brand new hardware that can’t charge off the most common adapter.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        on firefox mobile, can zoom but not pan or interact with anything? would make a sweet poster, though!

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I really, really like this idea. I keep finding neat applications, but I have zero interest in dealing with rbenv and pip and npm and whatever other ridiculous, fragile, polluting tools that are required by “cool” apps these days. With the right caching, I can see a world whereby I employ most tools via a well known docker container

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Does this mean if we have google analytics or mixpanel or anything else on our site, we’ll lost these functionalities?

                                                            1. 2

                                                              in theory, any analytics package should continue to work just fine in terms of giving you tracking data on visits and hits on your site. blocking 3p cookies will largely stop third parties from tracking your visitors across sites unrelated to yours.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Safari blocks third party cookies already. It’s likely your “analytics” are already incorrect.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  No, they will block only domains on disconnect.me blacklist. See the link in my comment above.

                                                                1. 14

                                                                  I feel that the near-monthly article about the “demise” of RSS misses one crucial point: while the perceived fraction of people using RSS may have gone down over the last decade, it is largely because newer Internet users are more on board with curated news feeds, and RSS users fragmented towards alternatives to Google reader, making them more difficult to see. Virtually all of the GReader users I knew of at the time of shutdown still use Feedly, NewsBlur, or Innoreader.

                                                                  1. 9

                                                                    I agree. RSS is not dead, but those who think that “RSS didn’t take over the entire internet, so it must be dead” are wrong. It’s still a crucial part of podcasts, and many major blog platforms still support it. There are many, many mobile and desktop RSS clients.

                                                                    But yea, this recurring meme of “RIP RSS” is getting really tiresome.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Innoreader ,o/

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Pedantic: targeting Dalvik is not “native”.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        in the Android world, building down to dalvik/art (as opposed to using a JS runtime or a cross platform translation layer) is very commonly referred to as native. this is not to be confused with JNI that compiles much closer to the hardware, but that has been a terminology quirk for years and years.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          I built and distributed an app for Android, but never referred to it as “native”. An “Android app” seems to describe it better. But I’ll write it down to one of bizarre ideas Java world has about computing.

                                                                        2. 1

                                                                          Whyever not? Targetting any other OS runtime is considered native, Dalvik just also has other things it does to be the OS runtime.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Native is targeting the system’s native instruction set, not running things in a VM. Dalvik is not any more native than JVM, which is to say not at all.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Does Dalvik run as a userspace process? I thought it lived in a somewhat special place compared to the users

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                I don’t have up to date knowledge of the platform, but in 4.x times Android apps ran as userspace isntances of Dalvik VM.

                                                                                Doesn’t make much difference though, if I run JVM as a kernel process it’s still a virtual machine.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  I’d argue if a VM is core to the operation of a piece of hardware as designed, running on that VM directly is native. I liken it in my mind to running software on a processor emulated on an FPGA

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    Well, a VM is never the core to operation of hardware. It’s a program like any else, compiled into native instruction set of the CPU it runs on. It is entirely possible to replace all software on an Android phone with something that doesn’t run any kind of VM. And if we take iOS world, all applications are compiled to native code instead of some agnostic VM.

                                                                                    Also, any Android system runs a flock of native applications providing runtime services to the VM. Things like SQLite.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          In security, one might use red for the sensitive one. Yet, that decreases inspection efficiency per this article. Maybe use red on the untrusted one to indicate it’s hostile. Or maybe just use regular labels on green boards. Might still use colors on the I/O connectors if it’s multiple boards in one package (eg case). Maybe traditional colors for Red/Black separation.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            What I’ve seen is red is for “should not be released” prototypes, green is production, the rest… no idea, fashion?

                                                                            Though I would love pink solder mask with white silkscreen, very obvious and blatantly non standard.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              there is definitely one small-run board maker out there that defaults to purple mask and it is sort of an entertaining tip-off when you see one for “yep, this is a small batch product”.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                Heh yep https://oshpark.com boards are pretty noticeable for the purple PCB’s.

                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                A lot of it is fashion, especially now that PC cases often have windows on them to allow people to check out your components.

                                                                                In my experience, entry level motherboards tend to be blue or green, with the colors getting more and more wild as you go up the price range into the more enthusiast models. Same with RAM.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Cheap, pocket games follow a Deadpool release. Uses pink and white on circuit board with unicorn sticker on inside of case.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    I need to know where I can get small batch custom pink PCB’s, I don’t want to have to do my own solder masking so I can get all pink PCB’s, though one thing i’ve been toying with as an idea is finding a way to deposit copper on clear glass so i could have clear “PCB”s. I have a project that would be soooo cool if I could get things onto glass.

                                                                                    I have found a 13 stage process that might get me there but it uses chemicals I’m not too keen on using anywhere in arms reach. :)