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    Thanks for sharing, was a nice read, even if it felt like the writer and I share a lot of positions on stuff and echo chambers can be dangerous for growth :slight_smile:.

    The only fact I would say that is completely wrong is:

    Svelte and Typescript are very useful, but the cost of building is always more than you think, especially once the codebase grows.

    The difference in cost of building additional features in Typescript vs Javascript is exactly zero, the costs are still there. The question is do you want your tooling to tell you about all the costs of making a change or do you have to discover, remember, and track them yourself? I know which one I would chose.

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      I think he was referring to time it takes to compile typescript to JavaScript (build time, not time to build/add new features). As opposed to files on your computer that your browser already understands and somehow reloads straight away when edited. He’s saying there’s a trade off between having a tight feedback loop and whatever benefits you get from your compiler/we pack/whatever.

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        in my experience it still takes more time to verify non-trivial behaviors versus your compiler telling you, “hey, you just messed this up”, and there is significantly more chance a bug makes it from your localhost to production. that is not free in any sense.

        that tight loop might be cool for your first couple of features, but as they get more complex you’re going to end up chasing ghosts, i will never start a new project in anything but typescript going forward myself, because anything interesting invariably gets rewritten in typescript anyway.

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      I’ve never heard the term “yeet” before, in any context? What is it slang for?

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        I had to look it up too. Here is my finding: https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/yeet

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          according to urban dictionary to throw with force :~)

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            It originated from this video specifically.

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          As a former scientist, I always had the feeling that science - the act of research - is also an art. Purely following reason won’t lead you anywhere new.

          When I do “artistic” things, the process I follow isn’t so different to science (research). It’s usually a combination of applying known stuff (techniques you’ve practiced a lot, whether it is drawing or writing or maths or coding or whatever) in creative ways, usually with some rough goal, and seeing what pops out. Then iterate.

          I like to break tasks/activities down into “creating”, or not - this seems correlated with what parts of my brain it feels like is being activated. Perhaps, in this way, “craft” is a decent word afterall?

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            The “old newspaper” format is very cool and folksy and also as a partially blind person very very hard to read.

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              The repeated reflowing on load is also rather obnoxious.

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                Super annoying. Thanks for the report! https://github.com/treenotation/dumbdown/issues/8

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                also as a partially blind person very very hard to read.

                Short answer: any specific things you hate and are there reading apps you love?

                Longer answer: I designed for Scroll to be the most accessible publishing platform ever. Will pull this off by having everything be public domain and the clean Dumbdown/Tree Notation source for every article readily available.

                The design is to make it easy for readers to “take all the content with you” and consume it with their favorite reader. Think RSS but 100x better, since you actually get the full content in the simplest possible notation and can use whatever tool you want to render it just the way that works best for you.

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                  Short answer: any specific things you hate and are there reading apps you love?

                  Hate is way too strong a word. I have partial vision in one eye at 20/200 vision with a severe astigmatism so my eyeball jumps around a lot. Packing the text into a super dense layout like that makes it nearly impossible for me to actually attain focus on each line in the article, making the layout very hard for me to read.

                  Glad to hear it’s an open platform with flexible rendering though, I’ll definitely take a more careful look, and thanks for sharing!

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                    The design is to make it easy for readers to “take all the content with you” and consume it with their favorite reader.

                    In that case it would be super cool if the static site itself had different viewing options for the same content that people could choose from.

                    The newspaper layour is “cool” but I’d like to be able to switch to a more standard blogging layout with one article at a time, larger font, margins on desktop, table of contents, hyperlinks between related articles, perhaps search, etc. A simple cookie could track my preference for which “viewer” I prefer.

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                      if the static site itself had different viewing options for the same content that people could choose from.

                      I wouldn’t be opposed to this.

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                    Totally agree! It would also be really cool, to only have the summary of each article shown. Sadly according to the readme the author is not interested in that…

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                    This was my first game and I thought for years that I just sucked at videogames.

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                      Yes! This was my first RPG. It was very hard but I got better at the jumping, eventually. Some games were meant to be hard back then, I actually kind of liked e.g. Baldur’s Gate where you would walk into a room and get creamed by high-level NPCs and die. I also liked the dark theme of U8… so much that when I played the other Ultima’s I was confused by all the good guy stuff. The fiddliness of the pentagrams made the magic seem more arcane. Overall - I think it likely could have become a good game with some additional dev time.

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                        Oh no! That must have been traumatic. I feel bad for past-you.

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                        XTree Gold for DOS used to have this - and the last page of the DOS 5.0 manual had a table of the ANSI mappings. When I was still quite young I figured out how to hack a few games saved games files (ahh, BattleTech) and had memorised a fair number of the symbols/byte values.

                        I always wondered why this convention wasn’t popular in the Linux world? Or why nice TUI tools similar to XTree Gold weren’t popular?

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                          My take on this would be that when I’m looking at the right columns I’m looking for text, that’s the whole point of the right column. Adding gibberish only makes it harder to spot the ASCII string and could maybe only help me to see repetition among bytes, which is already somewhat easy to do in the hex dump (At least, for most meaningful patterns such as values aligned on 4 bytes or null filling). The hex dump is often enough to spot binary patterns.

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                          Julia will do this. One can specialize or outright override existing function methods. Julia’s JIT compiler will even go back and recompile any code that may have depended on the old method to use the new.

                          Note of course this is dangerous when used carelessly - the system is intended for extending or specializing functions for new input types, rather than replacing methods. One fun thing to do is replace something fundamental like integer addition and watch everything immediately break, via e.g. Base.:+(a::Int64, b::Int64) = 0.

                          (While much of Julia’s compiler is written in Julia, it is itself is “immune” to such redefinitions because it lives in it’s own fixed “world”, but so much of the system depends on the standard libary that this instantly destroys any REPL session).

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                            Julia is actually at the top of my list! I just finished reading the manual, and I find it a bit unclear about this. It seems to indicate that sometimes an already-compiled expression or incrementally-compiled module won’t see overrides that come later?