1. 10

    Unifi has responded. Honestly the technical implementation seems fine it’s the way the feature was introduced without an opt-out on day 1 that’s the problem. That said, an opt-out is coming and I’m personally ok with the data they’re currently collecting.

    1. 2

      My personal backups:

      1. borg backups to a small ZFS NAS.
      2. borg backups to rsync.net.
      3. Photos are also backed up via iCloud Photo Library.

      Family members:

      1. Backblaze.
      2. TimeMachine (via SMB) to previously mentioned ZFS NAS.
      1. 3

        Pop_OS 19.04:

        • Emacs: code, text, rss (ivy-feedwranlger), email (mu4e), irc (via ZNC)
        • Firefox w/ Vimium
        • Apple Music in a Firefox container via web beta
        • Zoom for work calls
        • Slack for work
        • Signal
        • CopyQ
        • SSH
        • Docker for the various server apps I touch on a weekly basis
        • Window Corner Preview
        • AutoKey
        • system-monitor
        • Tilix or Alacritty for terminals
        • gTile.
        1. 1

          User upgradeable RAM. The t480s has 1 open SO-DIMM slot and 8GB soldered to the motherboard. This feels like a nice compromise. Of course I threw in a 16GB stick to have 24GB total.

          And my MBP has 32.

          User upgradeable SSD. I can easily swap the stock SSD. A Samsung 970 Pro 512GB SSD that is faster than what Apple ships in the current Macbook Pro is $150 from Amazon.

          I’ve got a 970 in my desktop linux machine. It’s definitely not faster than what Apple ships.

          1. 3

            And my MBP has 32.

            Right, the number wasn’t the point. The ability to upgrade the RAM myself was the point.

            I’ve got a 970 in my desktop linux machine. It’s definitely not faster than what Apple ships.

            Not sure what to tell you? I was seeing 2700-3300 Mb/s reads in the benchmark I ran on my 970. Reviews of the 2019 MBP 15 inch peg the SSD perf in the 2600 range. Not a huge difference but worth noting.

            1. 2

              Right now if you want to buy a MBP with 32GB of RAM, you have to spend $2799 and go 15 inch. Not even the same ballpark as the thinkpad.

            1. 3

              miss but don’t need

              I really need to start thinking about things this way, otherwise I’m gonna be stuck with Apple’s baffling engineering decisions for the rest of my life.

              I am using System76’s quite nice Pop_OS linux distro.

              Cue the open-source purist police!

              1. 2

                shh don’t point the police in my direction!

                The issue seems to be similar to the trashcan MacPro, in 2016 (ok let’s be honest probably 2014) Apple thought USB-C would be the standard I/O port. I think they were left holding the bag a bit by the really shoddy USB-C/TB3 adapter market at first.

                1. 2

                  I always figured the biggest problem for them was that power users simply didn’t want to be restricted to a single type of port. I guess that wouldn’t be as much of a problem with a stationary system like the Mac Pro, but I think it’s much worse for your average MacBook power user who needs to plug into the odd wired TV to play a video via HDMI, or router to set it up via Ethernet. You know, rare problems 😉

              1. 2

                Is 0.14” difference in thinness worth access to the ports, user upgrade-ability, and the longevity of the keyboard?

                0.14” plus the obvious differences in construction quality? Yes. A hundred times yes.

                1. 7

                  From the first look it might seem like cheap plastic. But, the looks are deceiving. IMO, most Thinkpads are second by toughness only to thoughbooks. The build quality is great. The plastic feels good, is resistant to scratches, and even if you manage to scratch it, the texture hides it. It has a metal frame under the plastic, which makes it very hard to break. Meanwhile, Apple sandwiches everything between two sheets of machined aluminum, which while better than plastic, isn’t that strong.

                  1. 3

                    I know you meant to type toughbooks, however I would really like to see a thoughtbook.

                  2. 7

                    Are you actually implying that Thinkpads are poorly built? Thinkpads are the laptops you’ll find in Fallout-style post-apocalyptic shelters. I’ve been using Thinkpads for 12 years now… Most of them are indestructible by usual hardware standards :-)

                    1. -1

                      Are you actually implying that Thinkpads are poorly built?

                      Yes, compared to Apple laptops, Thinkpads are poorly built.

                      1. 5

                        It’s clear from the language used by others here that Thinkpads are romanticised. I mean, I like them too, but it’s going to be hard for any of us to evaluate them honestly when much of the sentiment in this thread is borne out of “screw Apple!”. I agree that MacBook build quality is second to none (besides the flawed butterfly switches).

                    2. 6

                      I thought this too until I held my t480s in my hands. It’s solid as a rock: no flex or give in the body at all. Everyone who has held it remarks that it feels solid. Time will tell on longevity but I’m pretty optimistic.

                    1. 6

                      Ports. The t480s has 2 USB-A ports and 2 USB-C ports. It also has a full size HDMI, SD card slot, and full-size Ethernet. Is 0.14” difference in thinness worth access to the ports, user upgrade-ability, and the longevity of the keyboard?

                      Given that there are quite a few usb-c hubs[1], or single-use-case (eg. hdmi for presentations) dongles, out there that offer the ports in a breakout/hub/dongle format, I don’t desire a return of all the ports that I use so occasionally/seldom. Paying the size/thickness/weight tax all the time for something I use rarely isn’t a great tradeoff for me.

                      Then again, I use a laptop to be mobile, not as a desktop replacement. I realize that not everyone does this, so ymmv.

                      [1]: Kingston’s Nucleum has two USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI port, a SD and microSD card slot, one USB-C charging port and one regular USB-C port

                      1. 13

                        USB-C devices and hubs are pretty bad if you want to run more than one 4k60 display. Some can’t even do one. You can’t just plug in one hub and be done. I had to plug in three different USB-C dongles to get two 4k60 monitors, ethernet, keyboard, mouse, audio going on my 15” rMBP. Worse, USB-C slips and loses connectivity very easily.

                        The whole situation is asinine. Yes they’re meant to be mobile but I’m not paying $3k for something functionally equivalent to a netbook on steroids.

                        1. 6

                          USB-C slips and loses connectivity very easily

                          I missed this part earlier (or maybe you edited it in later). I very much agree with this one. I find usb-c a bit fiddlier than I would like, especially for power in comparison to the old apple magnetic (magsafe) power connectors. RIP magsafe.

                          1. 2

                            Multiple 4k60 displays seems a bit like a job for a desktop to me. That said, I agree that sucks. I wonder if it is a limitation of usb-c or just so few people with that use-case that nobody makes one that can do that yet.

                            EDIT: hmm. looks like a displayport 1.2 limitation, based on some searching. DP 1.2 supports a single 4K 60 Hz monitor, two 1440p 60 monitors, and so on. DP 1.3 supports more (gfx card willing), but I think usb-c/thunderbolt3 is still DP1.2. bummer.

                            1. 5

                              It’s a MacBook Pro. I was running 2 displays off a 12” Thinkpad with the dock years and years ago.

                              1. 4

                                And you can still do so if those displays aren’t 4k. The terrible industry-wide state of getting pixels from ram to screen is not Apple’s doing and any attempt they make to fix it themselves will be met with endless pearl-clutching about “proprietary connections”

                                1. 2

                                  I don’t mind how they fix it, I would prefer more port types than just USB-C. I think the decision to only have USB-C is aesthetic not functionality.

                                  1. 3

                                    There are functional reasons to want only one port on your device. However, their decision to go about it in classic Apple fashion, making the change out of nowhere, was certainly a head-scratcher.

                                2. 4

                                  A MBP will absolutely run multiple 4K displays on a single port.

                                  Fuck, a Mac mini with just Intel graphics will run 2 4K displays, also from a single port.

                                  1. 2

                                    I get that it has Pro in the name. Did you use docking at every location where you worked with multiple monitors? Monitors these days also just seem huge to me. I can’t imagine someone having two 30+ inch 4k monitors on their desk ( that’s a /lot/ of terminals! ;) ) and yet choosing to drive it with a laptop. The workflow comparison between that and running undocked seems significant.

                                    I do wonder if some portion of people get laptops just because, or on the off chance that they might do something on the go, but then they end up using them docked 100% of the time anyway. Definitely not saying this was you though, as I have no clue how you worked or used your machines.

                                    1. 5

                                      Some people don’t buy laptops but their company only provides laptops. You have to be able to use the laptop as a desktop replacement if you need/want to. Heck, desktops are a vanishing breed, I imagine 90% of them are sold as gaming machines, these days.

                                      1. 2

                                        Chiming in with an anecdote, but I will emphasize this is my singular experience and preference.

                                        I have a 2015-era Thinkpad X1 Carbon whose built-in display is 1440p. Most of my programming uses, I use it docked to an additional 1440p display, sometimes two and turn off the built-in screen in favor of two full-sized monitors. In both cases they are only 25” displays, but the additional pixels are very appreciated. I don’t really see myself upgrading those to 4K screens, but I can imagine others who might.

                                        Some non-programming tasks also benefit greatly from the extra screen real-estate. I do will sometimes design in Figma (full screen on one monitor) with the second monitor hosting two windows: an editor window for referencing existing CSS in our projects, and a browser open to the Spec for the project whose design I am working on

                                        I am very much in the “laptop for the off chance they might do something on the go” crowd, but those times are far from insignificant. A lot of it is on-the-go comms with my team, doing project management and product management tasks. I definitely would not be effective with only a desktop, i.e. only a phone for on-the-go productivity.

                                  2. 0

                                    Limiting yourself to a USB-C (protocol) dock/device when you have TB3 ports but clearly want a not-average-joe functionality makes no sense to me.

                                  3. 3

                                    For me, this (multiple do-almost-anything ports, vs several each do-1-specific-thing ports) is the killer thing, but it works specifically for Macs because those ports are all TB3 not “just” USB-C.

                                    For basic things (i.e. the common complaint about the pre-TB3 MBP having “USB-A, HDMI and SD card” you can get a single USB-C ‘hub’ to provide all those ports, but whenever possible (and particularly for stuff relating to displays) I actually tend to get/suggest TB3 devices.

                                    1. 2

                                      My question — and the question of most people I know who have a newer MacBook Pro — why not both? Why not have USB-C ports and a HDMI? TB3 is awesome but it doesn’t have to be exclusive.

                                      1. 4

                                        It’s entirely possible Apples reasoning is aesthetic, but to me, a HDMI port is useless, and usually adding a HDMI port means you lose something else (see: the 2018 Mac mini that only supports 2x4k displays over TB3 because the third ‘supported’ display must be over HDMI).

                                        HDMI is also one of the least-hard “problems” to solve: you already need a HDMI cable, so use a different HDMI cable, with USB-C on one end.

                                        1. 2

                                          You’re right. The Mac mini is a really good example of a combination of ports that folks really enjoy having access too.

                                          This is all a tangent though, the reality is Apple is bent on making their laptops like their tablets and I wish they wouldn’t. In the end though it’s all preference.

                                          1. 3

                                            reality is Apple is bent on making their laptops like their tablets

                                            Maybe the reality as you see it, but until they add touch screens to their laptops, I’m going to remain pretty dubious about that viewpoint.

                                            1. 2

                                              You missed my point. Not sure if that was deliberate or not.

                                              The Mac mini has HDMI.. for some reason, but because it does, you can’t run 3 DisplayPort 4K displays from it. You can run two DP, and one has to be HDMI.

                                              I would be happier if the mini had forgone HDMI for more TB3 ports (or even dedicated (mini) DisplayPort would be better than HDMI). I’d even give up the USB-A ports for more TB3 ports.

                                              reality is Apple is bent on making their laptops like their tablets

                                              I really cannot agree with that at all and I wonder if you somehow don’t understand that TB3 and USB-C are not the same thing.

                                              1. 2

                                                you can’t run 3 DisplayPort 4K displays […] I really cannot agree with that at all and I wonder if you somehow don’t understand that TB3 and USB-C are not the same thing.

                                                Well, if we are going to be pedantic ;). If you use DisplayPort 4K displays, you are not using Thunderbolt 3, you are using the USB-C DisplayPort alternate mode. They are separate things, since there are also machines that have USB-C ports that support DisplayPort alt mode, but not Thunderbolt 3, such as the MacBook 12” [1].

                                                So, why do you care about USB-C Thunderbolt 3 ports if you are going to hook up a DisplayPort display?

                                                (BTW. it seems that Apple’s wording is intentionally muddy here for marketing purposes.)

                                                [1] https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT206587

                                                1. 1

                                                  I use a TB3 to dual DisplayPort adapter, so it only takes one port. I can guarantee you it is not using USB-C alt-mode.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Now you are adding new data points. The default (and much cheaper) thing to do is to hook up a DisplayPort display directly to a Mac Mini or MacBook. Which is done using a regular passive DisplayPort <-> USB-C cable.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      No, I’m not.

                                                      You asked what’s wrong with a HDMI port. I told you: takes away video streams that would otherwise be available over DisplayPort.

                                                      Whether they’re routed over 3 USB-C to DP cables using Alt Mode, or via a TB3 adapter is irrelevant.

                                                      Go look at any tech forum with people having issues with displays: a decent chunk of them it’s because they’re using HDMI, because it was literally designed for TVs and receivers, being used for computer displays is an after thought, and it’s very apparent.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        HDMI doesn’t “take away” video streams, Apple does. If Apple really wanted, they could’ve added ability to use 3rd video stream using USB-C, but they didn’t. There is really nothing stopping them, except maybe the Intel chip that may not have a 3rd DP output.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          The UHD 630 supports 3 displays over dp hdmi or edp.

                                                          Apple chose to include hdmi which means one of those outputs from the igpu is used or “taken away” from potential as a DP output over USB-c/TB3.

                                            2. 1

                                              It’s entirely possible Apples reasoning is aesthetic, but to me, a HDMI port is useless, and usually adding a HDMI port means you lose something else (see: the 2018 Mac mini that only supports 2x4k displays over TB3 because the third ‘supported’ display must be over HDMI).

                                              HDMI 2.0 supports 4k displays. The Mac Mini specs explicitly state that you can drive three 4k screens:

                                              Up to three displays: Two displays with 4096-by-2304 resolution at 60Hz connected via Thunderbolt 3 plus one display with 4096-by-2160 resolution at 60Hz connected via HDMI 2.0

                                              https://www.apple.com/mac-mini/specs/

                                              1. 1

                                                That’s what I said. It forces one display of the three to be hdmi, which IMO is garbage compared to DP. I’d rather have no HDMI and be able to drive 3 displays over TB3/DP

                                                1. 1

                                                  Your comment was vague, it seemed to suggest that you cannot drive three 4k displays, but the point is that one of them has to be driven through HDMI. Fair enough.

                                                  Apple’s rationale is very logical. Quite some people use Mac Mini’s as media centers. They’ll have a TV with HDMI connectors and HDMI cables. So, it lowers the friction for a significant chunk of the audience for a tiny subset that insists on driving three 4k displays through DP. I am not saying that it is not a legitimate use case, but a niche. Apple will probably tell you to buy a Mac Pro or something.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    What is vague about this:

                                                    the 2018 Mac mini that only supports 2x4k displays over TB3 because the third ‘supported’ display must be over HDMI

                                                    I would bet money Apple do not include HDMI on a Mac mini for those few people who still try to run a media centre on one. Apple’s “solution” (in terms of what they support feature wise and expect people would use) is AppleTV.

                                                    They provide HDMI because it’s designed as a “bring your own display” device and a bunch of cheap shit displays have HDMI input rather than DP.

                                            3. 2

                                              Another reason is that the HDMI connector is bigger than the side of the MacBook Pro. Mini and micro HDMI connectors could fit but hey, even if it’s HDMI you need not-so-common adapters or special cables so USB-C/TB3 is not a bad alternative.

                                          2. 2

                                            The t480s does have 2 USB-C ports for breaking out to more exotic ports but having a nice selection of ports is great.

                                          1. 2

                                            If you really like macOS and it’s just the hardware that you dislike, you should try Hackintoshing the ThinkPad. It apparently worked well for someone else’s laptop of the same model. While I’m not a huge fan of macOS as an everyday operating system, I did set up a Hackintosh for a little bit of iOS development and it worked wonderfully on my desktop.

                                            1. 2

                                              I was just talking about this angle on Twitter:

                                              It would certainty be pretty trivial :) However, this is a work provided machine so that’s a no-go in my mind.

                                            1. 8

                                              I would not recommend using a Banana Pi as a router. The ethernet ports are all shared and if the operating system doesn’t load, it defaults to a switch. That means your WAN port gets directly connected and starts assigning public IP addresses to your local machine. I wrote about this before:

                                              https://penguindreams.org/blog/banana-pi-bpi-r1-fails-into-an-insecure-state/

                                              But if you really want to use it as a router, here’s my tutorial:

                                              https://penguindreams.org/blog/using-the-banana-pi-bpi-r1-as-a-router-with-bananian/

                                              I never though about using it as a NAS. That’s probably a much better and safer use. However, I recently switched to ZFS which recommends having 4GB~8GB of ram, which has kept me away from solutions like the Helios4. :(

                                              1. 4

                                                Don’t be put off by the ZFS RAM “limit”. I’ve run a small, two-drive-mirror NAS with 2GB just fine for quite some time.

                                              1. 7

                                                The CVE mentions macOS only, is this also an issue on other platforms?

                                                1. 6

                                                  The POC links did launch a zoom call on my Linux machine but I don’t see the port being used by a server when I run lsof -i :19421.

                                                1. 5

                                                  If you need a board with more than one network interface you could look at an ESPRESSObin: it has three gigabit interfaces, 1/2GB DDR3 memory and an ARM Cortex A53 processor. It is really small and cheap.

                                                  I’m running pfSense on it, bonding two interfaces, and using also as a VPN.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I am using the espresso bin as my main router as well, running openwrt. I don’t how’s pfSense support on this SBC, but openwrt can max out my uplink with wireguard.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      pfSense support is still really experimental due to the lack of hardware support of FreeBSD systems.

                                                    2. 1

                                                      Oh nice! I’ll have to look into these a bit more.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Raspberry Pis have 100Mbit networking.

                                                      If you need a decent CPU as well I’d get an Odroid XU4 (those even have gigabit iirc).

                                                      1. 4

                                                        I read the question as “I want my 100mbps ethernet link to be the bottleneck instead of than the CPU running the VPN software being the bottleneck”.

                                                        So, most or all models of raspberry pi don’t check the box, right?

                                                        1. 3

                                                          Anecdotally, I pull 100mbps through wireguard using a Raspberry Pi 3 without issue. As long as you aren’t relying on it for complicated firewall rules you should be fine.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            That’s good to know. I have an old raspberry pi at the moment that can’t crack 20mbps through WireGuard. Hence my question :)

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Older Raspberry Pis are really slow. Anything that’s not a Pi 3 (or better) won’t work (as you’ve found).

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Pi 3 is not very good either (other than the terrible I/O: it doesn’t even support AES instructions!). Try the ROCK64.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I guess wireguard doesn’t use AES

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    According to this article/post strongly but tangentially related to our topic here, no, wireguard does not use AES.

                                                              2. 1

                                                                Wow. Thank you for this data point.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I picked up a Protectli FW4B for use on my home network, which includes VPN use. They seem to be a lesser known brand but it’s been great for me. Ships with no OS and I installed pfSense on it.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Looks like a nice product but it’s out of my budget.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              I use a VPN running on my Synology NAS and couldn’t be happier. Dual bonded GigE to my router then gigabit fiber from there out to the world. It was dead simple point-and-click to set up a couple flavors of VPN. I know you didn’t mention needing additional storage, but QNap and Synology are crushing it with turnkey solutions in this space. Heck, it even runs Docker containers if you can’t find a server/service pre-packaged.

                                                              If you don’t like the built-in VPN options there are packages like https://github.com/runfalk/synology-wireguard

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Synologys are great just a little more than I’d like to spend.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  What’s your budget?

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    < $100.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Sorry to hear Synology is out of range. I use mine as a VPN as well and it works great.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                If you’re not averse to off-the-shelf solutions, Ubiquiti’s EdgeRouter line is great. I previously ran an EdgeRouter Lite (now using an EdgeRouter 4) which runs a Vyatta derivative (which is a Debian derivative). The ERL is a pretty cheap unit and quite performant. It has hardware offload for some things, like some types of crypto (e.g. for IPsec).

                                                                There’s an unofficial Wireguard port which I’ve been using for a while and it works great.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I’m not averse to off-the-shelf stuff and I’ve heard good things about the ERL. I’ll keep it in mind, thanks!

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I’ve certainly not had any regrets since I switched to EdgeRouter hardware. Before that I had m0n0wall on a Soekris net4501 and pfSense on an ALIX (I forget which board). Both the Soekris and ALIX were pretty underpowered and were fine as basic routers, but anything on top and they suffered.

                                                                    The ERL and ER4 have been really performant and are quite nice to configure from the CLI (at least I thought so; but then I’ve got JunOS experience and Vyatta largely copied Juniper’s config format).

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Nice! Have you ever run a non-stock OS on your ERL, some folks seem to have success getting OpenBSD on there?

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        OpenBSD runs fine on the ERL. I just wish there was binary patches for octeon. I should have waited and bought an apu2.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          Not yet, although now that I’ve got the ER4 I do intend on trying to put OpenBSD on the ERL.

                                                                  1. 8

                                                                    It depends largely on how many network interfaces you need. If this box will be your firewall/router too, the APU2 board https://www.pcengines.ch/apu2.htm ticks all of these boxes:

                                                                    • 3x independent gigabit interfaces
                                                                    • 64-bit x86 CPU with AES-NI instructions (which lets you run any Linux/BSD your heart desires)
                                                                    • cheap
                                                                    • small
                                                                    • low-power
                                                                    • fanless
                                                                    • hacker-friendly

                                                                    If you only need 1 network interface, then the sky is the limit. Virtually any used x86-64 hardware manufactured in the last decade can work, so hit up your friends and family for their old netbooks and whatnot. If you want to buy new, there are Intel NUCs, NUC knock-offs, Chinese-made embedded systems on Amazon (one brand name of these is QOTOM), low-power ATX mobo+CPU combos off of Newegg, old chrome boxes, the new $35 Atomic Pi.

                                                                    And those are just the x86 options. If speed is not super important, the Raspberry Pi can work okayish. There are some pretty decent higher-powered ARM devices on the market now, especially in the $50-$100 price range. If I was to buy one of those, I would try to get one supported by Armbian: https://www.armbian.com/

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      I currently have the old ALIX board which has the advantage of power over ethernet which is missing from the APU2 boards.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        +1 for the APU line of stuff. initial setup over serial can be a pain, but they are uniquely capable and well made.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          If you only need 1 network interface, then the sky is the limit. Virtually any used x86-64 hardware manufactured in the last decade can work, so hit up your friends and family for their old netbooks and whatnot. If you want to buy new, there are Intel NUCs, NUC knock-offs, Chinese-made embedded systems on Amazon (one brand name of these is QOTOM), low-power ATX mobo+CPU combos off of Newegg, old chrome boxes, the new $35 Atomic Pi.

                                                                          That’s a great point. I’ve seen old Intel Atom NUCs around $50 on eBay, those might fit the bill.

                                                                        1. 5
                                                                          • I got ivy-feedwrangler published!
                                                                          • Hoping to continue to push on a Github app idea I have.
                                                                          • Also working on getting my personal blog deployments squared away.
                                                                          1. 5

                                                                            Working on a native Slack client for macOS, in Swift 4.

                                                                            Preparing to interview for a compiler engineer position.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              holy cow this needs to be a thing! I’d love to see how you get on.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                It’s not quite ready for public beta and doesn’t have a proper website yet, but you can get notified when a release is ready, if you want. :) https://taut.netlify.com

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Great, thanks! Signed up!

                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                What kind of compiler you going to be working on if it’s not NDA’d or anything?

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  I did sign an NDA, unfortunately. It’s a very domain-specific thing.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    All good. Least you might get to do some interesting work.

                                                                              1. 1
                                                                                • Finished ivy-window-configuration last night which I’m very happy with.
                                                                                • I’d like to finish a github status package I’m putting together for emacs, but we’ll see how that goes.
                                                                                • That work has also lead to the beginnings of a Github app ¯_(ツ)_/¯.
                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  Web scraping is gross but incredibly useful. I’ve put together a cookbook of sorts for scraping with node. Maybe it’ll be helpful to folks just starting out.