1. 29

    The Dell XPS series has a firmware so bad that its engineers should be strung up in the town square for building it

    Perhaps this is nitpicking, but language like this really rubs me the wrong way. It’s short sighted because it assumes it’s all the engineers fault. It’s the kind of language I might expect from somebody with zero people skills and new in the industry, not from somebody who has been around for a while. There’s no place and time where suggesting we hang people because of their work should be acceptable.

    Setting that aside, I don’t understand what the point of this post is. It’s literally just a rant about laptops, but there’s no conclusion or anything. That’s of course fine for a personal blog, but I think such content does not belong on lobste.rs. I flagged the post for this reason.

    In terms of laptops, the X1 Carbon series is pretty good. Support is a bit iffy here and there (e.g. the microphone does not work until Linux 5.5), but this is true for pretty much any laptop that came out in the last two years or so. I had a X1 Carbon 3rd generation that worked perfectly, and recently replaced it with a Gen 7 since my Gen 3 was due for a replacement. They’re a bit expensive, but the X1 series is a good series.

    1. 5

      language like this really rubs me the wrong way

      Oh, please! This is obviously an over the top exaggeration used as a rhetorical device. Nobody is asking to kill anybody here. This is a common device in the English language, used often for fun, that even a non-native speaker as me was not confused about.

      1. 11

        This is essentially the same as saying “It’s just a prank!”, which is about the worst excuse for anything.

        1. 5

          No. It is just colorful language, and perfectly appropriate for a personal, light-hearted, blog post.

          1. 3

            No. The 90s wants its Torvalds back. This is never appropriate. Even if you’re joking. It’s a personal attack whether it’s a joke or not. Imagine being on the receiving end of this. Imagine walking up to one of the XPS engineers and saying this to their face!

            This blog post isn’t light-hearted - it’s full of spite - and “personal” is at its limits when you’re a high-profile developer publishing something on the Internet. So, overall, no.

            1. 4

              No. The 50s wants its censure back. Fortunately, Monty Python showed us that it is ok to say “fuck” in TV, even on a funeral, and to mock religion. Regardless of whether some people is offended.

              1. 4

                There is a huge difference between saying “fuck”, mocking religion, and suggesting that we hang people (and for laptops out of all things).

                I’m also unsure where you see the censorship here. Nobody is telling Drew he can’t share his opinion. But just as Drew is free to share his opinion, so are others free to hold him accountable for that; especially when he suggests we physically attack a group of people.

                This brings me to something important and often misunderstood: the right to free speech does not give you the right to say whatever you want without repercussions. Instead, it simply means the government can’t prosecute you for expressing an opinion within the boundaries of the law. I’m pretty sure that suggesting we hang people is not only tasteless, but potentially also outside of the boundaries of free speech.

            2. 1

              how is this blog post light-hearted, it’s called “fuck laptops”

              1. 6

                how is this blog post light-hearted, it’s called “fuck laptops”

                It is light-hearted precisely because it is titled “fuck laptops”. The profanity right at the title is a clear indicator that the content of the post is not going to be extremely serious, and it will use a certain amount of hyperbole. When you say that “you are dying to go to that restaurant” nobody in their right mind is going to call a suicide line. Likewise, if I say that you should be tarred and feathered for misunderstanding such an obvious joke, nobody is going to accuse me of hate crime, death threat or intimidation.

                1. 5

                  Do you find it in the least bit strange that, in the face of multiple commenters disagreeing with your disagreement with one of the most upvoted comments on this post, your argument consists of statements like “Oh, please! This is obviously . . .”, “even a non-native speaker as me was not confused about”, “the title is a clear indicator that the content of the post is not going to be extremely serious”, and an analogy to “such an obvious joke”?

                  Doesn’t it seem like your argument that “it’s obvious” isn’t likely? If the case you’re stating was as obvious to others as it is to yourself, you wouldn’t have to make the case to so many different commenters as well as upvoters.

                  Just to be clear, I’m not saying that Drew should or should not use the rhetorical style that he did. I think he has a fair point when he says that he doesn’t post this kind of thing to lobsters and he’s just writing for himself. tptacek made a similar point about his writing on HN – he feels limited in what he can write since any random thought he posts to his blog will make it to HN.

                  1. 3

                    Isn’t it obvious in this case that your argument that “it’s obvious” cannot possibly be correct?

                    I guess everybody understood the joke, including some people who just wanted to make a fuss about it.

                  2. 0

                    Swearing in a blog post is not a universally-understood signal that its contents are not supposed to be taken seriously.

            3. 3

              The point was also that the language was used to make engineers look bad without knowing the circumstances.

              Overall the tone in the post is unfriendly and offensive, a bit more than necessary for a rant.

            4. 3

              My 2016 or 2017 era XPS13 model 9360 no touchscreen is perfect.

              • kensington lock so i can take a pee at a conference without needing to carry my laptop in like a weirdo.
              • sleep on screen shut and resume wokrs and has done since day 1
              • 2 usb A ports & a usb c port that can drive external display and GB network
              • onsite repair warranty seriously this was amazing when they came round and replaced the keyboard -all day battery use while coding and sysadmin if i dont crank brightness to full -dreaded coil whine never bothered me
              • has gone completely in bios and video driver update
              • all of the above works on FreeBSD its my daily laptop except the SD card
              • i replaced whatever wifi it came with an intel 8265 which is adequate

              Pity the whiners are banging on Drew. Write your own display drivers then. Its his blog so whatever its hardly controversial and the exaggeration is not imo excessive.

              1. 2

                Perhaps this is nitpicking, but language like this really rubs me the wrong way. It’s short sighted because it assumes it’s all the engineers fault. It’s the kind of language I might expect from somebody with zero people skills and new in the industry, not from somebody who has been around for a while. There’s no place and time where suggesting we hang people because of their work should be acceptable.

                This. For what it’s worth I agree.

              1. 3

                if monday counts, i’m seeing hatsune miku in berlin this weekend. pretty excited!

                1. 1

                  Is it my conn or are there no photos in this post?

                  1. 1

                    Hm, there’s two pictures in the post

                  1. 2

                    I reviewed a system76 laptop back in 2014. I have avoided System76 ever since, but perhaps it’s time to give them another chance. Have they addressed the problems noted in that earlier review? Particularly the one about the power cable not fitting in well.

                    1. 4

                      Yep, the power cable fits in perfectly (and the power brick is much nicer and smaller as well). The touchpad has physical buttons now too, I don’t think I’d buy a laptop that doesn’t except for the MacBooks.

                    1. 7

                      That was a much shorter review than I was expecting. No comments on performance, battery life, features, etc.

                      I wish they had an option to order the laptop with no nvidia card. The last two laptops I’ve owned, I deliberately purchased them with only the built-in Intel video chipset for two reasons:

                      1. Say what you will about Intel, but they actually pay people to write and maintain high-quality Linux drivers for the bulk of their hardware. I have had zero issues ever with Intel video and wifi stuff and will keep buying them while that’s the case.
                      2. I play games about twice a year and the ones that I do play are no more demanding than Minecraft and Portal.
                      1. 4

                        Eh, less of a review, more of my impressions after having the thing for about a week or so. Performance is what you would expect from an RTX 2060 (very good), but I don’t use any particularly performance-intensive programs or games. Battery life I have yet to really analyze, that’s why I didn’t include it in the post.

                        1. 1

                          Point 3: Often the GPU becomes far more trouble than its worth; drastically increasing heat output, reducing battery life, and often being the first point of failure on the machine. It’s not worth it. (I’m also glad eGPUs are starting to become a thing for the laptop-only crowd as a result.)

                          1. 9

                            Rewriting a backend from Rust to Elixir :upside_down:

                            1. 2

                              Hey marisa, What motivates you to do so ? I am curious ^^

                              1. 2

                                Mostly due to the ecosystem just not being there yet, but also the slow compile speed are really impacting our project. The breaking point was when we added an error logging crate and it slowed down our RLS runs by 5 seconds each (they were ~1sec before).

                            1. 9

                              Now onto migrating the ecosystem from the futures prototype to the final version in the standard library. They’re almost the same, but some cleanups done before finalizing standard library version mean they’re not directly compatible.

                              Warning: if you’re just learning Rust, avoid async code for the next ~3 months. There’s no point learning the “old” way now, but it’ll take a bit before the “new” way is fully supported by libraries.

                              1. 2

                                Seems like the actual Rust book won’t be having any mention of async in a while: https://github.com/rust-lang/book/issues/1275 – and the async book mentioned on that issue is full of TODOs: https://rust-lang.github.io/async-book/

                                1. 4

                                  https://book.async.rs/ has less TODOs a d I will fill them over the weekend/coming week.

                                  It’s not general and based on async-std, though.

                                  1. 4

                                    do you mean https://book.async.rs/?

                                    1. 2

                                      Eh. yes. Fixed!

                              1. 8

                                I use Jekyll as my default. Every time I try to use another SSG besides Jekyll, I keep noticing things I’d have in Jekyll normally. Unfortunately, I’ve made the mistake of attempting to write a SSG multiple times, sometimes in JS, sometimes in Rust, but those were more experiments than anything.

                                1. 2

                                  going to help organize a rally against a family of property owners that has been relentlessly kicking out their tenants in order to raise property prices :)

                                  1. 5
                                    • alacritty running fish shell
                                    • firefox with bitwarden and a vim keybind extension
                                    • sway/swaylock/swaybar
                                    • claws for email
                                    • emacs as my editor, with stuff like company, flycheck, org, lsp-mode
                                    • all running on void linux
                                    1. 4

                                      gonna do some raids in final fantasy xiv with some pals, and recover from jetlag (hopefully)

                                      1. 10

                                        While I agree with the practical suggestions of this article in principle, what’s being suggested here effectively sounds like “host your own git repositories so you’re free of all criticism and can let your toxic behavior go unchecked”? I think there’s a difference between GitHub taking action on things that are legitimately offensive and would go against any Code of Conduct, and the true political censorship GitHub has been enforcing over the last months, such as barring users to access their site based on their location.

                                        1. 16

                                          Presumably, people disagree with Github about the what constitutes “toxic” and “legitimately offensive”.

                                          Or (like me) they are uncomfortable with a service enforcing their views, even if the views themselves are reasonable.

                                          1. 14

                                            Personally, I would like it if the services I used barred people who don’t think I deserve to exist from participating in the same things I participate in.

                                            1. 7

                                              I would like it if the services I used barred people who don’t think I deserve to exist

                                              FWIW, I have strong issues with people who think other categories of people should not exist, and it sucks that you have to deal with them.

                                              However, I don’t think this is a very good long term practical solution, especially when the moral compass of a lot of SV companies seems to be directly related to the amount of social media pressure a given issue garners. I would perhaps have a different viewpoint if companies had a well articulated, solid set of moral principles that they stuck to.

                                              Even then, I see services such as code hosting as completely orthogonal to political/moral judgement. I see no reason why they should be intertwined.

                                              1. 13

                                                I don’t want to retread the same ground that we’ve been on 100 times before for the sake of winning an argument online, so I’ll just say that my opinion is that all social spaces are political and therefore require moderation (codes of conduct, etc) in order to be welcoming to newcomers. GitHub has a much larger precedent on this than almost all other code hosting platforms I’ve seen.

                                                1. 9

                                                  I don’t see how every social space being political logically leads to the conclusion that they should be welcoming to newcomers. And every social space being moderated sounds like a totalitarian nightmare.

                                                  I can see that ‘social’ aspect of github does potentially shift it towards more of a political space, especially as they do position themselves as a place for newcomers. I would say, though, that people like the author of the article wanting to move away from that social aspect and the attendant rules is not necessarily a sign that they want create a den of free-for-all abuse and horror. Perhaps they just don’t want every space they inhabit to be political.

                                                  1. 12

                                                    Professional social spaces (that is: places where some of the people have to be there in order to keep a roof over their head) need very different rules from other kinds of space.

                                                    1. 5

                                                      Indeed; github is in some ways more like a workplace than, say, a cafe or a park.

                                                      Thinking about it in those terms helps me to clarify my objection. Github is more analogous to an office building than to an organisation. It’s a piece of infrastructure within which individuals and organisations come to work. It would seem rather bizarre if the owner of an office building enforced rules about the speech of their tenants.

                                                      It’s obviously an imperfect analogy.

                                                      1. 4

                                                        It would be bad if every cafe and park was required to enforce the same rules as a workplace, just in case you encountered someone you knew at work there.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          If Github is analogous to an office building, surely a project within it is analogous to the group of people operating within it.

                                                          If those people put up a sign saying “You’re welcome to come in, but don’t do X”, and you decide to do that anyways, don’t whinge when they call security (github) and ask to have you escorted from the premises (banned).

                                                          (that is: projects have codes of conduct; github has very lax rules other than ‘behave on other peoples projects’)

                                                          1. 4

                                                            (that is: projects have codes of conduct; github has very lax rules other than ‘behave on other peoples projects’)

                                                            The original article has examples of github enforcing their own set of standards.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              If GitHub’s own rules are that minimal, then to respond to @marisa’s original point, the relevant distinction isn’t between GitHub and self-hosted projects, but projects with an appropriate (and enforced) code of conduct and those without one. And AFAIK, there’s no reason why more project maintainers who conscientiously apply and enforce a CoC shouldn’t leave GitHub and host their repo, issue tracker, etc. under their own domain.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                I agree, but that’s not what the blog post sounded like :)

                                                      2. 2

                                                        I’ll just say that my opinion is that all social spaces are political and therefore require moderation (codes of conduct, etc) in order to be welcoming to newcomers.

                                                        Even if you take this as read, and I think this statement taken in isolation is reasonable, you still need platform diversity because some platforms will settle on codes of conduct which you see as wrong, perhaps even horribly wrong. One example is TERFs: They see trans women as males invading female spaces and will work extremely hard to police that kind of thing, which is inherently unfriendly to trans people. Unless you’re absolutely sure none of the kinds of platform you want to participate in (code hosting, web hosting, issue tracking, etc.) will go a pro-TERF route, you need some kind of backup plan to avoid dealing with them.

                                                        Self-hosting is simply the ultimate backup plan.

                                                    2. 10

                                                      It’s getting annoying to have to keep a list of the services I shouldn’t use due to overly pedantic/prescriptive definitions of sex/gender.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        That is confusing: How sex/gender came into question with Git Hosting?

                                                        Of course it is a social network that tries to map account to social identities. That is the source of the problem: Github being not only a git service but also aiming to be a part of our “lifestyle”.

                                                        1. 19

                                                          It’s common for queer activists, particularly trans activists, to argue that people who disagree with them on political issues related to sex and gender “think they don’t deserve to exist”, using that specific phrasing. I think this kind of rhetoric is nearly always disingenuous, designed to make it seem like their attempts to censor opposing rhetoric are unquestionably-righteous, rather than themselves a kind of true political censorship. If you think that your own freedom to publish things on the internet is important, then you should try to avoid centralized services like Github precisely because they can be co-opted by political activists (who you might not agree with) who think that advancing their cause and suppressing their opponents is more important than your freedom to publish things on the internet.

                                                          1. 6

                                                            I think this kind of rhetoric is nearly always disingenuous, designed to make it seem like their attempts to censor opposing rhetoric are unquestionably-righteous, rather than themselves a kind of true political censorship.

                                                            There is a difference between censorship and trying to maintain a level of basic human decency in a community.

                                                            In order for a larger community to function you need to set at least some rules in place to determine what kind of behavior and speech is not welcome. The worst you allow sets the bar. I can think of at least one genuinely “censorship”-free place and we all know how pleasant of a corner of the internet that is.

                                                            So assuming we can agree that at least some rules are needed, the question – and I’m by no means saying it’s an easy one – is where to draw the line. For me, unsolicited opinions about trans people are very far from simply “disagreeing on political issues”. They’re actively harmful. How can you “disagree” with someone’s lived experience? Is that not, in itself, a form of invalidation, of erasure?

                                                            The kind of behavior and speech you allow also effectively silences people who would otherwise like to be part of the community by forcing them out or discouraging them from joining in the first place. But somehow, people are more worried about censorship. I’m more concerned about the people who didn’t even get to say anything in the first place.

                                                            1. 5

                                                              When I become king, this will be stapled to the doors of GitHub, Twitter, the BBC…

                                                              I might run out of staples.

                                                              1. 10

                                                                I think this kind of rhetoric is nearly always disingenuous, designed to make it seem like their attempts to censor opposing rhetoric are unquestionably-righteous, rather than themselves a kind of true political censorship.

                                                                Whenever I hear or read someone saying “trans people are too pushy” I mentally substitute them saying “women are too shrill”, or “black people are too uppity”, and I afford their utterance precisely the amount of respect it deserves.

                                                                1. 9

                                                                  You’re proving @Hail_Spacecake’s point.

                                                                  What you just said can be logically reduced to “whenever I hear someone say x, I substitute that with some y that they didn’t actually say.”

                                                                  This is exactly the kind of straw-manning disingenuous argument style that we’ve all become accustomed to when engaging this specific flavour of political activist.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    I’m saying that there’s no qualitative difference in the arguments against trans rights than in past arguments against the rights of women, gays, or people of color.

                                                                    1. 9

                                                                      A criticism of an underhanded debate tactic used by a group is not a tacit denial of that group’s rights.

                                                                      I mean, look at it the other way around: You’re arguing against me. Does that mean you don’t believe I deserve equal rights?

                                                                  2. 4

                                                                    trans people are too pushy

                                                                    But that’s really not what @Hail_Spacecake is saying, is it? He points out that there are queer/trans activists who reduce opposition to the personal attack that one “don’t deserve to exist”, which if it is a “common” thing, would be a legitimate criticism. Other than that, I don’t see how what you say related to the discussion? If anything, you would want decentralised systems so that those who do actually say “X are too Y” don’t control you, or inhibit you in acting according to your intentions.

                                                                  3. 4

                                                                    It’s common for queer activists, particularly trans activists, to argue that people who disagree with them on political issues related to sex and gender “think they don’t deserve to exist”, using that specific phrasing

                                                                    Do they? Do they, really?

                                                                    Might it be that those people who “merely” “disagree with them on political issues related to sex and gender” are actually opposing their existence? Like, say, by supporting bathroom bills - which are aimed at removing gender non-conforming folks from the public eye - by opposing anti-discrimination laws, or by trying to make access to treatment more difficult?

                                                                    Might it be that their “disagreement on political issues” is also, most of the time, accompanied by behaviours that go beyond mere disagreement, and that “I just disagree with [homosexuality|transsexuality]” is never just that?

                                                                    designed to make it seem like their attempts to censor opposing rhetoric

                                                                    Is it really censorship if someone says “you suck” at the Westboro Baptist Church because of what they say? I thought both had a right to express their opinion.

                                                                    Oh, sure, maybe hearing “you suck!” over and over again might make them think twice before opening their mouth.

                                                                    Is that censorship? In any case, is it wrong? And, do you think that LGBT+ people are immune to it?

                                                                    I feel like getting told, over and over again, “trans people are mentally ill”, “there is only two genders”, “they are just doing it for the attention”, might have a chilling effect on that population.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Is it really censorship if someone says “you suck” at the Westboro Baptist Church because of what they say? I thought both had a right to express their opinion.

                                                                      No, but it is censorship for github to bar them from using their SaaS product because of what they say. It’s definitely censorship for trana activists to attack the entire concept of decentralized github alternatives for the specific reason that it would make it harder for github to enforce a code of conduct requiring that they be barred from github for what they say, which is what several people in this thread about decentralized alternatives to github have done. We’re all the Westboro Baptist Church in someone’s eyes, and I don’t want Github making that judgment call for everyone who writes open source software.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        It’s definitely censorship for trana activists to attack the entire concept of decentralized github alternatives

                                                                        Where, exactly, are they doing that?

                                                                        Because I’m looking pretty hard at this thread and I can’t seem to find “trans activists attacking the entire concept of decentralized github alternatives”, or doing so because “[decentralized alternatives] would make it harder for github to enforce a code of conduct”.

                                                                        I saw a few people expressing their worry and disappointment, how they felt unwelcome in some spaces because of petty, discriminatory asshats, and how an article starting with “controversy resulting from GitHub censoring” - listing events often described as “those damned S-J-Ws want to destroy open source” - might be read as endorsing alternative spaces as free from censorship and, by extension, free from “SJWs” and “political correctness drama”.

                                                                        As one example of a censorship-free, “SJW”-free spaces is Voat, you can see how it might be concerning to some.

                                                                        There wasn’t much else here, which is both disappointing and funny. Why, “those spaces cannot be censored and might become a free-for-all” sounds more like an endorsement than an attack.

                                                                        We’re all the Westboro Baptist Church in someone’s eyes,

                                                                        Yes, yes, yes. Trivially true, and yet irrelevant.

                                                                        We are all the Westboro Baptist Church in someone’s eyes. We are all monsters in someone’s eyes. We can also avoid trite platitudes such as this one.

                                                                        1. 0

                                                                          Where, exactly, are they doing that?

                                                                          https://lobste.rs/s/s0s8fu/why_not_github#c_g1rymt

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            The only argument against decentralization I can see there is this mild statement:

                                                                            decentralization can be harmful in unexpected ways (see: all of Bitcoin)

                                                                            And I really don’t see how you determined that @rebecca is a “trana*(sic!)* activist”. I certainly could not from her About page.

                                                                  4. 5

                                                                    It matters when you are a gender/sexual minority and want to avoid being shat on for factors beyond your control

                                                                    1. 7

                                                                      It is easy to people in the majority to say “it’s not that painful to be in the minority”. Until they face another situation, for which they belong to the minority and suddenly change the reaction toward “it’s a nightmare everyday”.

                                                                      We all are in one majority for some topic. We all are in a minority for some other topic.

                                                                      If one hesitate between “Do I include the minority and be frown upon by the majority” and “Do I exclude the minority and be safe with the majority”, then it’s all about asking to ourselves: “in that other case in which I am the minority, would I appreciate to be included by the majority?”.

                                                                      Then the choice becomes obvious to me: treat the 10% minority as a first class citizen and fully give it the 10% it deserves without reserve.

                                                                2. -5

                                                                  I’m left-handed. For now, this is just a simple fact which to me is totally natural while others wonder how I am able to do anything at all without fumbling all the time given that they belong to the right-handed majority. When people in that group describe my particularity they use terms like ‘south-paw’. There is a Wikipedia page on bias against left-handedness. So far, so good, I’m left-handed like Kermit the frog is green-hued and have yet to make a song about the fact, unlike Kermit.

                                                                  Give it a few years on the current course and my left-handedness will have turned into an identity marker, yet another artificial boundary separating my clave from all the others. Give it a few more years and there will be left-handed people clamouring for the removal of right-handers who have been caught using ‘derogatory’ terms like ‘south-paw’.

                                                                  I do not relish this prospect as I do not feel the need for others to ‘take up my cause’ in calling for the removal of people just because they think I’m an oddity. Let them think whatever they want, as long as they’re not out in the streets calling for pogroms against left-handed people their words won’t hurt me. I would certainly not want them to be banned from services I use because that would only lead to more balkanisation.

                                                                  Ignore the loud-mouths, their liberty ends where yours begins. The same is true vice-versa, you can not force them to accept your particularity just as they can not force you to accept theirs.

                                                                  1. 25

                                                                    To be clear, there are, in fact, people out in the streets calling for pogroms against lgbt folk, and in many countries they have state backing.

                                                                    1. 27

                                                                      YIKES. This colour doesn’t look good on you.

                                                                      You have not been removed from your family because of your handedness. You have not been fired because of your handedness. You have not been threatened with death because of your handedness. You are not vilified daily because of your handedness. You do not have your personhood disconfirmed because of your handedness. You do not have your sanity questioned because of your handedness. You are not at extremely heightened risk for suicide due to societal and familial rejection due to handedness. etc etc etc etc etc etc

                                                                      as long as they’re not out in the streets calling for pogroms against left-handed people their words won’t hurt me

                                                                      And yet this is tantamount to what we’re talking about.

                                                                      Ignore the loud-mouths, their liberty ends where yours begins.

                                                                      Would that it were so. :/

                                                                      1. 17

                                                                        you could have used the minutes spent to write this extremely in-bad-faith argument to do literally anything else

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          In what way do you deem my argument to be in bad faith? It is not. The balkanisation of society into identity groups is a threat which needs to be countered or we’ll all end up behind walls glaring at each other.

                                                                  2. 6

                                                                    For other readers’ info: https://help.github.com/en/articles/github-and-trade-controls

                                                                    GitHub themselves don’t really have much choice in the matter, but if you live outside the US, it makes perfect sense wanting to host in your same country, so that you don’t have to deal with two different sets of laws at once.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Author here. Added this link to an update to the article. Thanks.

                                                                    2. 2

                                                                      Interesting, I hadn’t heard about that. Looking into it, though, I do agree it’s a much bigger concern than those mentioned in the article.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        barring users to access their site based on their location.

                                                                        They and everyone else have to follow the law.

                                                                        1. 4

                                                                          While that is true not everyone using GitHub lives in the US. So in many cases it really is using GitHub rather than being more independent causing that particular issue.

                                                                          Of course that applies to similar central hosting platforms and other countries and therefor laws as well. I’d also not read that as anti-GitHub in particular, but to a large part anti-centralization.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Still in Kyoto for vacation, so I might check out some local arcades. I’ve heard there’s a nice bridge over east, too, but Sunday’s supposed to get really hot, so maybe not yet.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Won’t get you out of the heat, but you could head up to Kurama station on the north side of the city, do some hiking in the forest, and have lunch/dinner on one of the platforms suspended over the river. Makes for a pretty fun day trip!

                                                                        1. 5

                                                                          Starship is the minimal, blazing fast, and extremely customizable prompt for any shell!

                                                                          As long a said shell is one of bash, fish or zsh.

                                                                          1. 15

                                                                            Your point is fair, because installing for Fish/Bash/Zsh is all they explain; but I’m not sure it’s accurate, because Starship’s core is indeed shell-agnostic AFAICT. Below is the core call. It prints the colourized prompt for the current user/host/directory, which is what every shell’s prompt function must boil down to. Starship’s shell-specific initialisations provide code to compute $cmd_duration etc. for every prompt, but in the end they all make the core call.

                                                                            starship prompt \
                                                                                --status=$exit_code \
                                                                                --keymap=$keymap \
                                                                                --cmd-duration=$cmd_duration_in_seconds \
                                                                                --jobs=(jobs -p | wc -l)
                                                                            

                                                                            All those flags are optional, if you shell doesn’t store command duration or whatever.

                                                                            To prove this particular shelly pudding, I edited my ~/.tclshrc to look mostly as follows:

                                                                            if {$tcl_interactive} {
                                                                            
                                                                                package require tclreadline
                                                                            
                                                                                namespace eval tclreadline {
                                                                                    proc prompt1 {} {
                                                                                        return [exec starship prompt]  # <-- Starship here
                                                                                    }
                                                                                }
                                                                                # go to tclrealdine's main loop.
                                                                                tclreadline::Loop
                                                                            }
                                                                            

                                                                            That got me the Starship prompt in my Tcl REPL. And cd’ing to a Git repository got the Starship prompt to display information on Git’s dirtyness, active branch, and all that jazz. So yes, as long as your shell’s prompt-function can call external programmes, and is running in a VT100 terminal emulator, and that terminal emulator has a Powerline font installed to render the fancy characters — Starship will work for that shell!

                                                                            1. 7

                                                                              Oh, well in that case, I’m happy to be proven wrong. I do wish they had a section along the lines of

                                                                              For other shells, the command starship prompt may be used to generate the prompt, but setting it depends on the shell itself.

                                                                              if only to prevent my embarassing myself with a kneejerk response.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                Noted!

                                                                                We will be writing up some docs on how to write your own starship wrapper for your shell of choice.

                                                                            2. 6

                                                                              tcsh users unite. (My default shell since 1995.)

                                                                              1. 5

                                                                                Similar to how “portable” these days mostly means “works on Windows, macOS and GNU/Linux [sometimes musl/busybox/Linux by accident]” these days, I guess. Not that it’s a good thing, but I can see how they’d arrive at that marketing claim.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Works on the most common shells on the most common operating systems.

                                                                                  ?

                                                                                  1. -2

                                                                                    And people use some strictly posix shell interactively as their preferred shell?

                                                                                    get real.

                                                                                    1. 10

                                                                                      Who said anything about strictly posix? There’s quite a few BSD users and developers on here. OpenBSD for example uses ksh as a default, and its version of ksh has even been ported to various linux distros (under oksh or loksh, usually). FreeBSD uses tcsh, and NetBSD (IIRC) ash.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        Your parent comment was just plainly POSIXLY_INCORRECT

                                                                                      2. 5

                                                                                        I use eshell as my preferred shell.

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      I want to know how to get my Thinkpad to play March of the Volunteers on boot, that does sound sick as hell

                                                                                      1. 2
                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          oh my god that’s really good

                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                        This is similar to the “koans” exercises you can find for a few other progrmming languages, right? It’d be nice to have a central list of them all.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          AFAIK there’s no explicit “koans” for Rust, but this is the closest thing I could find to a list of katas/koans: https://github.com/gamontal/awesome-katas

                                                                                          1. 4

                                                                                            Exercism has “koans” for many languages, including Rust: https://exercism.io/tracks/rust

                                                                                            I used it a few years ago when starting with Ruby, and then again a few years later when starting with Go. Was pretty useful both times. Didn’t do the Rust ones so can’t attest to the quality of that (or compare it to your website).

                                                                                            One of the things I liked is that people can review your code, and in my experience some actually did and caught out some things I could have done better in some cases.

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              Ah, right! Exercism is a good resource, and we used to run with it in workshops. Unfortunately, a lot of their exercises were quite math-based, which is why we also started offering Rustlings :)

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                Exercism for Rust currently has the serious problem that we have many maintainers, but also far too many things to review.

                                                                                          1. 7

                                                                                            Just run:

                                                                                            curl -L https://git.io/rustlings | bash

                                                                                            Oh boy, no? And please stop suggesting people to pipe random strings from the Internet into their shell.

                                                                                            (Doesn’t mean anything about the quality of the exercises. They look quite fun.)

                                                                                            1. 8

                                                                                              You can’t really compromise on ease of installation, as we’ve found out during workshops. If you’re sceptical, you can always inspect the script or do the steps manually.