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      Plain python, lightweight, IMHO can be useful to autogenerate documentation for simple projects (hence its sphinx support).

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      entr, ripgrep, fasd, fzf, bfs, + parallel, chronic, vidir and ts from the moreutils package.

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        borg + borgmatic :

        • incremental
        • client-side encrypted
        • deduplication
        • and so much more :-)
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          Borg looks good, similar to Duplicity, but I’m looking for a backup format not a backup system. I am under some unique constraints, which precludes the use of comprehensive solutions like that.

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            Are you able to clarify your constraints any further? Reading down, it looks like:

            • You’re looking for long-term storage
            • You have your own storage backend
            • You want a format that will let you upload incremental changes to [any|your] storage backend and is reasonably platform-agnostic, for future-proofing (eg might be file-based, but not tied to a specific filesystem)

            Are these correct/did I miss anything?

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              Pretty spot on!

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            I have a shitty bash script I run. Borgmatic seems great, thanks. I have mine pointed at rsync.net, which gives you a discount on storage if you use Borg.

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              The linked post is an advertorial for Storj.io, which is a decentralized alternative.

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              Working remote requires trust. Trust can be built by long-term commitment, real interest and care for your (langage) community. Trust is often transitive: people there can recommend you so that’s easier for you to work remotely. Try to get closer to people who have talent : don’t pretend you’re interested if you’re not, don’t try to seduce them. Don’t try to be the brilliant jerk. Get better. Help people. Don’t pretend to be someone else, try to focus on what you like most, and learn to like what you need. Choose to get closer to good team players, avoid your local brilliant jerk. Pair program with them on open source projects. Add value. Target exotic yet super efficient functional languages, i.e. Elm if you’re focusing on web technologies. Be pragmatic. Once you’re rewarded by trust and perhaps a remote position, stay with them, take care of newbies. As a bonus : such a community also helps a lot on the social side of working remotely - that’s not easy for everyone.

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                Trust can be built by long-term commitment, real interest and care for your (langage) community.

                That’s a really interesting point, thank you. I don’t think I’ve ever really been involved in a language community since I stopped using Perl, some years ago. I don’t see much community in my current areas.

                Don’t pretend to be someone else, try to focus on what you like most, and learn to like what you need.

                I’m good at the first two - that’s how I’ve ended up where I am. Now it sounds like I’ll have to learn to like something different. That isn’t necessarily bad though, different can be good.

                Target exotic yet super efficient functional languages, i.e. Elm if you’re focusing on web technologies.

                I would love to do that. I worry that if I target the exotic, I reduce my job opportunities too much. Perhaps this worry is unfounded.

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                  I worry that if I target the exotic, I reduce my job opportunities too much. Perhaps this worry is unfounded.

                  I think it cuts both ways. There are fewer jobs in “exotic” languages, but that also usually means fewer (or no) local experienced candidates (especially for employers outside of Silicon Valley), so companies are forced to be a little more creative. If you’re writing Java or Ruby, it’s harder to stand out from the local talent pool. Also, I suspect employers who are more willing to try exotic languages are also more willing to try exotic working arrangements like distributed teams.

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                    Another way to state “learn to like what you need” is “take care of yourself”. I don’t think that’s optional. :)

                    Exotic and efficient languages indeed narrow down job opportunities. It’s not a problem if you can count on trust, and it can even be an advantage WRT your income.

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                  It reminds me a bit code2flow.

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                    In the good old days there was source navigator. The last release was in 2014. Maybe it has some interesting successor you’d like to talk about?

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                      SourceTrail is pretty nice, but I’ve yet to use it at work: https://www.sourcetrail.com/