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    RE: the size of the data, HTTP CDNs have file size limits, it sucks to find out like this though. I think AWS CloudFront’s limit is 20 GB. Does Azure Blob Storage support requester pays? https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonS3/latest/userguide/RequesterPaysBuckets.html. Unfortunately this general idea prevents anonymous (unauthenticated) access to the data.

    RE: cloud costs, big business risk! I’m continually disappointed that no cloud offers a “hit this cost then email me three times and disable this thing for the month”. We need stock trading “stop orders” for the cloud.

    I work for AWS, my opinions are my own not my employer’s.

    1. 2

      Azure does support this though. The cost alerts (like in the linked post) as well as hard spending limits. Or did you mean something else?

      1. 1

        Thank you! I did not know Azure supported spending limits. https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/cost-management-billing/manage/spending-limit

        1. 1

          Yeah, except now that I read about it, I think it’s not as general purpose as I thought. It looks tied to subscriptions that have monthly credits, which is how I became aware of it.

      2. 1

        I have cloudwatch alerts setup at different bill levels and as they come in make sure they match what they should be at that point in the month. I’m sure you could link SNS to something that started shutting things down. A regular task I perform is the cost analyzer–I have a budget to maintain.

        Alicloud has rate limiters on the device networking interface at least, I forget if you can just limit the data transfer entirely.

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        Running into this actually gave us enough push to move to Postgres while we were making such a large change. MySQL is shooting itself in the foot.

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          I did the shift from datacenter to AWS a long time ago, but things were written with simple server type equipment in mind. So, the biggest shocks were simply that it was going to take much larger instances to replicate the hardware we had. It was a sticker shock. After that the work was identifying the biggest wins for adapting what we had to what AWS offered to cut costs. The big wins came early, and over time we were able to add more and push costs down to close to what they had been before. It is still probably more expensive, but it is also much more agile when I need more or less resources in a way that physical hardware would never offer. It was a mature application, and stopping to rewrite would have not made sense for the company with its resources. So, I disagree with the first point in at least some cases.

          I think the case for not running your own kubernetes cluster doesn’t go far enough. I think EKS is for many users just an option given to them to give them the sense that they aren’t giving up control and knowledge. Most people just don’t need the extended configurability and the technical debt is significant. If you seriously consider things, I think ECS actually makes the most sense for the vast majority of situations. It feels like FM, but that is kind of the point. You’re already buying into AWS to some degree, so why not just give in and use the services they offer. It’s my understanding Amazon runs very large ECS services internally, and efficient use of your time makes the most business sense.

          For alerting, you have to make sure your alerts make sense and that you diligently handle them. The whole point is to automate things so your time goes farther, so if something alerts it should be analyzed to see if it can be prevented in the future. If you start ignoring alerts they are either not necessary or you aren’t fixing them or they actually are rare cases. Also, you should pay attention to the problems you do have that aren’t covered by an alert and look at how that might be a missed metric across other parts of your project. Pager burnout is a serious problem that you cannot afford to have. It signals a failure in at least one place in your organization. This is often where operations has to push back on development to fix root causes. If the error message is indecipherable and you haven’t briefed ops on how things work enough to diagnose the issue, I am going to look at the git log for who is responsible and call them. AWS offers a horrible service (the name I forget), which is ostensibly for automating responses and writing playbooks for errors, but I think is probably most used to automate reboots and encourages bad habits for all but the largest systems.

          Python, Ruby, Rust, and Go all suffer from the dependency problems. I can’t deploy NixOS into production, but one thing I love is being able to write a derivation for some random python thing and fence it in with its dependencies. I think you just have to use shell scripting when it is simple, and standardize on a language for actual tools and stick with it. Configuration management should really handle dependencies, and having everyone just use the same language means that everyone is comfortable with the same style and language. Every language essentially sucks in its own special way anyway. Compiled languages for admin/ops tools have always seemed like the wrong way to go due to the additional complexity of rolling them out in traditional linux environments. Also, your tool may end up being replaced by an industry standard one down the line and you should just migrate to that. I have often had my own tool before someone else’s took off and became better at what I was doing.

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            Python, Ruby, Rust, and Go all suffer from the dependency problems

            How do Rust and Go suffer from dependency problems? They both ship statically-linked binaries, right?

            1. 3

              Security issues, large numbers of dependencies for simple tasks if you aren’t careful.

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                I don’t really understand. All languages that support importing third-party packages are subject to dependency concerns, but Rust and Go discourage dependencies to the maximum feasible extent… what language/ecosystem has a better stance in this dimension?

                1. 1

                  I think OP is referring to the way both make it very easy and normal to pull in dependencies that go ALL the way down, making a simple project with a few dependencies rely upon hundreds of different codebases. This is something we recognize as a problem in nodejs, but have replicated again since it’s just so easy.

                  1. 2

                    Ah, I see. Thanks for restating it.

                    To some degree I think this is kind of a natural consequence of the productivity expectations placed on modern software engineers. Those self-contained projects of yesteryear had a lot more time budget to work with, and fewer table stakes features to check off the list.

                    1. 1

                      I think that’s correct, but we could still make heavily nested dependencies less popular, at least in theory.

                      1. 1

                        Sure! You can do that through culture and through tooling. I think Go stakes out a position that’s about as far in this direction as a language can feasibly manage in our zeitgeist. But maybe there’s even more that could be done!

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            I’m not sure I agree on the ‘Don’t Design for Multiple Cloud Providers’ point. It sounds as if his experience is designing for multiple cloud providers but deploying in only one. This means that your second-provider implementation is never tested and you’re always optimising for the first one. AWS probably isn’t going away, but a particular service in AWS that you depend on might. If AWS’s market position gets more entrenched, they can easily put up prices on you. This is what a lot of companies are deploying a mix of AWS and Azure: it prevents either company from putting up prices in a way that would seriously impact your costs. If Azure gets more expensive, shift the majority over to AWS. If AWS gets more expensive, shift the majority to Azure.

            Advice that boils down to ‘don’t have a second source for your critical infrastructure’ feels very bad.

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              AWS knows this, and they’ve structured their pricing to make deploying to multiple clouds prohibitively expensive by making internal AWS bandwidth cheap/free, but AWS<->rest of the world super expensive. There’s no point hedging your bets against AWS. Either you’re all-in, or avoid them entirely.

              I’ve worked for a company that had a policy of developing everything for AWS+Rackspace running in parallel. When AWS had an outage we could boast that we remained up, but it wasn’t even a big win, since most of our customers had other dependencies on AWS and were down anyway.

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                I agree with the author. I was going about kubernetes implementation and just had a realization that I was so focused on not tying my knowledge to one provider that I was wasting a lot of time. I specialized in Unix systems and other things in my career, and honestly AWS is so large that just being an AWS specialist is a skill in itself. Thankfully, the large cloud providers basically all clone themselves, and if I use terraform and such eventual porting is likely to not be impossible, but proving it constantly just isn’t worth my time. There are options to cost control AWS, but they already win on being the lowest cost of the top tier clouds when I last compared prices. If I ever need to shift, I’m sure I will have some months to do so and the cost of those months will likely be lower than the investment in always testing on two clouds. I do not like this reality, but I think it makes the most sense.

                1. 8

                  I agree that “being an AWS specialist is a skill in itself”.

                  But so is being an Oracle DBA, or a Solaris sysadmin, or a Microsoft ActiveDirectory admin… and I feel strongly that tying my employment skills/identity to a corporation that I don’t even work for has to be a mistake.

                  It doesn’t stop lots of people from being paid to do it. It’s just wrong for me. My whole life in computing has been about fundamentals lasting while market leaders come and go; that may be the effect of luck, though: IP, routing, switching, DNS, NTP, SMTP, SNMP, UNIX-like operating systems: I think all of these things will still be recognizable and valuable in 2050.

                  1. 4

                    I started early enough that I was able to learn the fundamentals and experience things I think younger people are going to miss out on. It will affect their ability to troubleshoot at lower levels for sure. I am sad that I no longer get to work with routing and switching hardware outside of my home. I’ve always had the perspective that I should learn what I’m getting paid to use–and often just use that at home as well. I had Sun workstations at home when that was my life. I run my personal stuff on AWS to practice now, but still pay through the nose for a home switch with SNMP. AWS’ DNS and NTP are just going to be better than mine. I don’t use their SMTP due to cost, but I would love to never touch SMTP again. I run personal servers on DO and Alicloud also due to geo and pricing and honestly the terraform and other processes are not significantly different. If I’m being paid to make the best choices for someone, then I have to be open to everything AWS offers if they are on AWS. And, I’m still doing all of this because I enjoy that there’s always something new to learn. I would never make AWS my only skill.

                    1. 0

                      Just apply at tailscale?

                2. 6

                  The entire list seemed right, except for that point.

                  Yes, it’s hard to design for multiple clouds. Technically it’s very hard. However strategically, the chance of a single provider shutting you down or killing your favorite service or charging too much for you to survive… these are all more likely than the cloud provider going away.

                  Technically hard. But doing so successfully can make all the difference in a bad spot.

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                    Usually this is only worth it if multi-cloud is actually part of your business proposition. If you’re not Hashicorp or Pulumi…probably not.

                  2. 5

                    well the whole article is AWS specific (to the point I get the weird urge to run away), so I wouldn’t wonder

                    modern AWS depending customers are more a cult than anything else

                    1. 2

                      It kind of looked like an AWS ad to me.

                    2. 1

                      I agree. While they might not go away, all big cloud providers have proven that they are not magically immune to large scale failure (and certainly not small scale), so as with everything in IT it makes sense to invest in a backdrop strategy.

                      It also can be good to keep things portable, because business decisions (internal and external) might require migrations.

                      For newer projects it’s also easier to at least aim for being portable in that regard. Using Hashicorp tools, using minio or seaweedfs or anything S3 compatible as well as Kubernetes (or nomad if you want to self manage) significantly reduce the amount of work required compared to only a few years ago

                      Yes, it’s not zero effort, but this being possible when you have big stakeholders that have huge interest to lock you in isn’t granted. Given this things became relatively simple.

                      I actually not so long ago had a client that ordered me to make an AWS setup work on GCP (partly technical, partly business reasons). They were not migrating, but required it to run on multiple clouds.

                      How quick that went surprised both them and me, but it certainly also was a well made setup in first place, so the list of things that had to be changed was short and easy to figure out.

                      I am sure it would have been a lot more complex only a few years before that, so maybe that recommendation is only true for older setups?

                      Everything comes with effort, but to anyone thinking about that I’d recommend actually looking into it a bit to see if it’s really as much effort as you initially might think.

                    1. 3

                      Would be interesting to know how this would work out on KUbuntu. I’m kinda shocked people recommend manjaro as first distribution, that’s one step away from arch. And I’ve never had to care about steam libraries on kubuntu.

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                        The Manjaro user guide and the Arch wiki are insanely good documents. The documentation alone makes it such a great starting point because there’s high-quality places you can look.

                        1. 3

                          Fair, the arch docs are sometimes the only place you can find information.

                          1. 4

                            Honestly I end up using the Arch wiki to diagnose problems in Ubuntu and macOS. It’s really understated. I would love to have a printed copy of the Arch wiki to keep on my desk as a reference manual.

                        2. 4

                          Manjaro is a gateway drug for users who want to learn and are interested in the challenges and puzzles it provides. If you are ok reading docs, it can be fun and quite educational. For someone who just wants things to work, I can’t recommend it. Having said that, I got the crazy idea that I would put Ubuntu on an old machine for someone and that it would be OK. I stuck with LTS because I’ve been burned by not immediately upgrading non-lts releases. I then looked in the GUI app installer and gave up. I couldn’t put a friend who is not technical through that. The app selection was pitiful and the dearth of useful review information was just shocking. I should also mention how much I enjoy Christine’s blog posts after I adjusted to the style.

                          1. 2

                            I’ve been working on my style for a while. What do you think I should do more or less of?

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                              Just be yourself. Your intelligence makes you unique.

                              1. 2

                                Fair! Always trying to improve my craft :)

                            2. 1

                              Oh I was writing more from the perspective of: My first non-windows as someone that isn’t studying IT. Like for your sister or relatives that aren’t tech people. Where it should first show that it “just works” instead of overwhelming you with issues and technical details that are only nice to see when you’re actually interested in that stuff.

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                                Totally. I was just highly disappointed with how badly Ubuntu LTS managed to fit that description. I’ve heard there are better options, but it isn’t something I get into regularly.

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                                  Well I guess that really depends, I’m running KUbuntu LTS on 4 machines for exactly that use case..

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                            I agree with parts. GMail is definitely a trap, but after some tweaking I did get mbsync working fine. It only is broken if I need to restore mails into GMail, and the fault lies with GMail. There is a bit that seems to suggest you need postfix to send, but you only need mstp to relay out via GMail. I haven’t seen a need for a local IMAP server… I like that my emails are stored in flat files because I’ve done some things that really needed that before. I only wish I could go back in time and have chosen Fastmail for email.

                            The spam issue is correct. Most of it is either companies relentlessly emailing me and making it hard to subscribe (I particularly want to shame Hanes and Mack Weldon. No one needs almost daily emails from Hanes.), or cold calling marketers, who have taken to ‘this is the last email I will send’ shortly followed by more emails. I basically never see my email shared with partners–and I use unique addresses for each registration. I get a lot of unwanted mail because I am not motivated enough to fight it and it is easier to just delete it in mutt in weekly cleanup sessions, and then those deletes get pushed to GMail. That is one habit I’ve developed–skimming email for urgent things and then handling less urgent stuff in batches. I’m not sure I need linkedin anymore, but they are very chatty. I have to have Facebook, but they are maddening with friend suggestions to my phone and email that just are not even good guesses.

                            The problem is that leaving email migrates me farther from sources of information that survive over time. Usenet has only a few active communities, forums are even dying in favor of things like slack and discord that are extremely hard to export data from if it is possible at all–knowledge just disappears now. Scrolling to the top of a slack channel is so very slow, and then they only preserve things for a while. I had an immediate negative response to discord, so I am not authoritative on it other than it never showing in search results. Things don’t get indexed and search engines think they are smarter than me and then may require you to use just the right phrasing to find what you want. It has turned me into a link hoarder.

                            I do however have emails and list emails from the early 2000s (it would go back to the 90s, but there was an incident.)… And lists are great at providing web archives.

                            I am not very confident that things sent over a Gemini inspired mail system will persist over time or not end up in the same email spam war if at all successful.

                            I think really that what the internet is has just evolved over time, and I’m getting old. Just like my music collection stagnated mostly, my tastes in how I use the internet have not kept up with how it has changed. I have respect in Gemini as an enclave for some, but it also has NIH problems. I think the lower stress solution to email is to just do it in batches and not stress over inbox 0. And actually, as some online communities disappear and I am sad, I also do find new stuff that I like or double down on old haunts.

                            I guess that’s my rant response to a rant about email.

                            1. 5

                              I think really that what the internet is has just evolved over time, and I’m getting old. Just like my music collection stagnated mostly, my tastes in how I use the internet have not kept up with how it has changed. I have respect in Gemini as an enclave for some, but it also has NIH problems. I think the lower stress solution to email is to just do it in batches and not stress over inbox 0. And actually, as some online communities disappear and I am sad, I also do find new stuff that I like or double down on old haunts.

                              Just want to gently push back a bit on this. I personally think there is WAY too much “Meh” going on in tech right now.

                              E-mail has problems as it currently exists mostly due to the way things evolved over time. If someone is actually thinking about making a fresh start and potentially fixing some of these problems, why not support them?

                              1. 5

                                If someone is actually thinking about making a fresh start and potentially fixing some of these problems, why not support them?

                                If the plan is to fix things for everyone, then the effort is doomed to fail because of path dependence and network effects, and I’m therefore uninterested. If the plan is to fix things for a few nerds who are willing to pour a lot of effort into their communication stack, then I’m uninterested because that group doesn’t include me.

                                Either way, I’m unaffected. And I think that is, more or less, how most people feel.

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                                  You’re making the assumption that SUCCESS == widespread adoption.

                                  I would argue that even an attempt at fixing some of the larger issues is a success whether or not it sees wide adoption because even in failure we gain anti-patterns and counter-examples we can use when we enact an actual fix further down the line.

                                  Tech has a negativity addiction, and I think it’s both unhealthy and counter-productive.

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                                    That’s fair. To be clear, I wish all of these people well, I’m just not holding my breath that I’ll ever actually be able to use any of the stuff they’re building.

                                  2. 5

                                    If you are unaffected and uninterested either way, why not just look away and move on? Why make a point of saying you think it’s going to fail or is uninteresting?

                                  3. 5

                                    Just want to gently push back a bit on this. I personally think there is WAY too much “Meh” going on in tech right now.

                                    Too much “meh”? Every other post on every tech news aggregator I’m on is talking about how tech is destroying the world.

                                    I think the true answer here is that, the mindshare behind Email is gone. Valuable content is being created on places like Slack, Discord, Matrix, Discourse, Zulip, Reddit, and Twitter. From the start, these platforms cut these problems out of the solution space, so most folks don’t have to think about these problems. As @b1twise mentioned

                                    I think really that what the internet is has just evolved over time, and I’m getting old. Just like my music collection stagnated mostly, my tastes in how I use the internet have not kept up with how it has changed.

                                    To some extent, I think an effort at “reviving” email for email’s sake is really an attempt to fix a social problem with a technical solution, without meaningfully addressing email’s competitors/descendants. I think https://delta.chat/ takes a more reasonable approach here in solving a specific subset of usecases via Email.

                                    1. 2

                                      Respectfully, I reject the assertion that E-mail isn’t worth saving because chat, reddit, and Twitter.

                                      These are fundamentally different technologies with different characteristics and use case, and I’ll also note that each of the services you cite are:

                                      • Not decentrailzed
                                      • Not open source
                                      • are all, except for Slack, struggling to monetize themselves.

                                      E-mail is distributed, open standards compliant and not reliant on a single source server platform which will cause the entire thing to vanish if a company goes under.

                                      Saying “None of the cool kids are using it so it’s irrelevant” is not a particularly compelling argument to me.

                                      Also, this argument in my mind anyway has VERY little to do with judging the merit of an alternative technology that shares some of E-mails goals but learns from its mistakes.

                                      1. 3

                                        I did refer to Matrix, Discourse, and Zulip in the list all of which are open-source, and Matrix is actually decentralized! Discourse does support Email as a first-class way to read and reply to posts, although there’s no way to search through the protocol itself for older messages.

                                        I didn’t mean to say that E-mail isn’t worth saving. I think it’s the rare example of a decentralized protocol that still has a lot of mindshare. What I mean to say is that, it’s worth taking a focused use-case and using Email as the substrate for that. A lot of decentralized projects like, say ActivityPub, are focused on creating and promoting the actual substrate protocol, instead of creating a “product” for a user to use. It took Mastodon to really create and popularize the experience around ActivityPub (well kinda, the protocol evolution is a bit messy and there’s lots of prior art here before Mastodon) before ActivityPub itself had worth as a communications protocol. I find that Delta Chat actually focuses on a product experience end-to-end and by doing so gives a compelling user story to use Email. Matrix is also focusing on an end-to-end experience and is developing their protocol alongside their product experience so that there’s a useful product for end-users first and a synchronization and update protocol second. Focusing on the networking and the decentralization is cool for us hackers, but it’s not that useful for actually communicating. What I meant to say was that trying to popularize Email as the “next thing to use” is trying to tackle the social problem of “facilitating communication” and apply a technical solution “use Email” as a result, when what’s needed is a focused application atop Email. Hope that makes some more sense.

                                        1. 2

                                          Matrix is both decentralised and open source

                                          1. 1

                                            It is! However it isn’t easy to maintain long term archives of Matrix traffic that I know of, and also @GrayGnome didn’t cite Matrix in his post :)

                                            Matrix is awesome, but it’s not the same kind of animal as Email or a modern Email alternative.

                                    2. 1

                                      I recently got a full CLI email client working for gmail with mbsync, fdm and some other stuff. Works brilliantly on macOS. Documented here: https://github.com/elobdog/mailhelp

                                    1. 1

                                      I used to use the MX Master 1 at work and liked it so much that I got an MX Master 2 (which is essentially the same product) at home. The USB port is nice because you can charge it easily and continue to use it while doing so (looking at you Apple) but I go months between charging it. So no, the presence of the port does not mean bad battery life.

                                      1. 1

                                        Thanks for sharing that, maybe MX Master 3 will be my next mouse then :)

                                        1. 1

                                          I loved my MX Master. Slinging the scroll wheel around was quite rewarding. I’ve switched to a Kensington Expert Mouse trackball for now. I was disappointed the logitech vertical and trackball mice had such inferior scroll wheels.

                                        1. 3

                                          Bought to support such work. The old O’Reilly emacs books got me into the world of emacs (for better or worse), and elisp opened a whole new world for me.

                                          1. 1

                                            I used to do the custom ROM thing, but I’m tired of fighting with a device I depend on so much. Google hired the magisk developer and so the safetynet bypass is going to be left to others in the community, and I don’t expect that to go well. I’m only willing to look at the new mbp seriously with the promise of one day getting linux, and the current support of nix. I’ve been in the Apple ecosystem before and I think the iPhone is still firmly in their philosophy of dictating what you can and cannot do and that their way is the only way and naturally the best way. Google ships to 13 countries (and I’m not in them) and only offers a single SIM anyway (can’t do eSIM). So, when my current phone ages another year, there’s really only one choice. Samsung has a mature skin, an ecosystem of products, promises of OS upgrades, and an excellent policy on patches. I may just stay in the mid-tier though. Hopefully by then the last of the features I really use will have filtered down.

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                                              Both the linked article and a lot of comments are skating towards where the puck was 10 years ago.

                                              First off, the majority of people with “computing devices” are using Linux because they’re using Android.

                                              Second, “Linux on the desktop” started as a goal, evolved into a bitter joke, and has been passed on by events. A computer with a desktop is simply not the main way people use computing devices nowadays. If you use one, you use it because your work requires it, or you’re a gamer, or you have specialized needs or are a developer “for fun”. A significant number of these people have access to more than one computer[1] and might be perfectly happy to install Linux on it, use it for whatever, and never really run into any pain points (or be savvy enough to google for solutions).

                                              In other words, Linux fills a niche, but is probably not the only computer for that user. Pain points in Linux are easy to deal with if you just visit your bank (for example) using a phone , or attend meetings like @b1twise mentions.

                                              So where does this leave the idealistic idea of the original “Linux on the desktop”? It was, in my opinion, based on the idea that people would get a computer, pay less for it because there was no OS bundled in the price, and get an equivalent or superior computing experience.

                                              But computers got more complex, and more locked down, and Apple and Microsoft stopped charging upfront for their OS (probably because Linux was seen as a competitor), and Linux distros ran into problems keeping up with stuff like audio, high-DPI monitors, and Bluetooth. And as a swelling tsunami, phones appeared as the main computing device and only Apple caught that wave. Linux couldn’t keep up.

                                              Apart from abtruse ideological justifications, Linux is not a better experience for most users. But it is a great experience for stuff like servers, or pi-holes, or for people who want to do home automation etc etc.

                                              “Linux on the desktop” is outdated because the desktop is not where people are anymore.

                                              [1] Personally I have access to one work computer running Windows, a personal Macbook, one VPS running Ubuntu, a used NUC running Ubuntu as well, and a RPi4 running Raspbian.

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                                                According to the 2021 Stack Overflow survey even developers use Windows or MacOS more frequently than Linux for development. If devs, probably the demographic most equipped to thrive with a Linux install, don’t use Linux as a majority, I can only imagine what the usage is like for non-developers.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I’ve always taken the approach of using what I get paid to use at work at home also. That has been mostly linux or a version of unix of some kind. Knowing that my career would be doing this kind of thing, I was happy to invest time in learning the tools of my trade. This has ended in an environment I’ve very comfortable with and that extends over time as I learn new things. I can boot into windows or bring it up in a VM, but it just doesn’t work the way I am used to doing things and that ends up being frustrating. I think the closest thing to success of linux on desktop is ChromeOS, but the hardware manufacturers are really hurting it with unreasonable prices and specs.

                                                  I do agree that generally the normal person has a laptop because they use it for work or are in school. Beyond that they can probably be happy with an iPad and/or a cell phone. And most casual software is just designed for phones. The android tablet experience is still plagued by poor support by apps. I see it as: a child gets a tablet, gets older and graduates to a phone, gets farther in education and needs a laptop, graduates and probably gets a laptop for work and buys their own phones. If they are inclined they may also have a tablet or a game console. And a smart TV. And I’m fine with that. Over the years, it has significantly lowered the amount of tech support I provide to friends and family.

                                                  I considered giving someone an old laptop with linux on it due to its lower specs. For the extended support lifetime, I installed Ubuntu 20.04. I got as far as the app store and realized it wasn’t being fair to put them through that.

                                                  I’m quite interested in the reviews of the new mbp models. If thermals are good and battery life is good I am willing to deal with macos until linux is viable (if ever).

                                                1. 4

                                                  I develop for Linux on the server and (mostly) enjoy it. I’ve tried using it on the desktop twice, once about 2 years ago and another time a decade before that, and gave up after a few days each time. If you come from an environment where everything more or less “just works” (MacOS in my case, although quality is palpably declining in recent years), it’s borderline incomprehensible why people put up with such a buggy and user-hostile environment. I’ll bet my company wastes at least 30 minutes each week on screwed-up video calls thanks to buggy audio and video hardware support in desktop Linux.

                                                  1. 8

                                                    I honestly don’t experience this: I run Linux as a dev environment & everything just works!

                                                    If anything, the user experience for USB devices is better under Linux than Windows - stuff just seems to be supported OOB & I don’t even need to go hunting for drivers these days.

                                                    It’s possible that I have been lucky with hardware choices, but I do find it quite weird that my experience is so out of line with the rants I see about it online from time to time.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      If you come from an environment where everything more or less “just works”

                                                      Perhaps I’m affected by having used Linux from 1996, but seems to me that Linux is the environment where everything just works. With the exception of exotic hardware, but those are relatively easy to circle around these days by a bit of planning.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        it’s borderline incomprehensible why people put up with such a buggy and user-hostile environment.

                                                        While this is true on average, it’s not like Mac or windows are strictly better. There certainly are reasons to prefer Linux. Mine are (in comparison to windows and Mac circa 2014, not sure what’s the current state)

                                                        • setting up dev environments. Installing Python on windows was a nightmare. Homebrew sort-of works, but you are still fighting the system.
                                                        • installing software in general. If I need a thing, I just type “install thing” in the terminal, and it just works. I don’t need to manually install each piece of software or babysit the updates. I update system whenever I find it convenient, the whole process is fast and I can still use my device while the update is in progress. As the sibling comment mentions, no futzing with drivers either like you have to do on windows.
                                                        • I personally don’t like mac’s GUI. Un-disablable animations, dock eating screen space and window management don’t work for me. I much prefer windows way, where win+arrow tiles the windows, and win+number launches pinned app. It’s much easier to get that behavior in Linux, and, with some tweaking, it is optimizable further.
                                                        • Modern windows tries to stuff a lot of things from the Internet into your attention, with suggestions, news, weather and the like. On Linux, you generally use only what you’ve configured yourself.
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                                                          You can hide the dock on a Mac, and it no longer “eats screen space”. You can also trivially install an app to do window snapping. I love my Linux desktop but there’s no way I’d say it’s easier to set up window management in it.

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                                                          I do video calls on my phone. It has a better camera and far superior microphones. And, it just works. On my desktop, the issue is usually with really poorly done end user software. So, the exception is Google Meet since it is browser based. I’ve just come to realize that the different devices I own are good at different things.

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                                                            If you come from an environment where everything more or less “just works” (MacOS in my case, although quality is palpably declining in recent years), it’s borderline incomprehensible why people put up with such a buggy and user-hostile environment.

                                                            Curiously, I use Linux for exactly the same reason: it “just works” without faffing about, whereas I never had this experience with Windows, or with my (brief) exposure to macOS. I don’t know if this is different expectations or different skill-set or something else 🤷

                                                            Then again, I also just have a simple Nokia as I feel smartphones are hard-to-use difficult user-hostile devices that never seem to do what I bloody want, and everyone thinks I’m an oddball for that, so maybe I’m just weird.

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                                                              It’s not that Linux “just works”, or that any OS “just works”, for me. It’s that I have a strong likelihood when using Linux that there will be a usable error message, a useful log, and somewhere on the Net, people discussing the code.

                                                              So debugging user problems is much much easier on Linux (or *BSD) than it is with Windows or MacOS.

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                                                              As someone who is slowly migrating to a linux desktop, I agree.

                                                              I keep reading online about bluetooth, fingerprint, suspend/hibernate, multi-monitor scaling issues plaguing linux and these are things I just never have to worry about on my mbp.

                                                              Aside: I will say though that it seems like mac is the only OS able to get bluetooth right. On my windows machine it barely works and every once in awhile I have to re-pair.

                                                              Linux has come a long way since I first started using it 20 years ago but you really need to enjoy tinkering to get it right.

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                                                                Somehow, Android gets bluetooth right, on more-or-less the same kernel that Linux desktops run on. But I have never seen bluetooth work reliably on a Linux desktop. Intermittently, yes, reliably no.

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                                                              I’ve always found the dns-oarc folks and specifically their mailing lists and workshops to be extremely educational. Truly a source of knowledge.

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                                                                How do you take care of your wrists and hands?

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                                                                  This. I developed painful RSI in my wrists and elbows in my late 20s, and fortunately got workers comp and physical therapy, as well as starting to take ergonomics really seriously.

                                                                  I had a girlfriend once who, by her mid-30s, had fucked up her arms with RSI from over-coding, to the point where she could no longer use a normal keyboard or mouse, had lost a lot of hand strength, and had chronic debilitating pain in one shoulder.

                                                                  100 hours a week of typing is sweatshop hours. It’s not sustainable.

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                                                                    Kind of this. Your body will begin to break in different ways eventually. I had to get deep into ergonomics. Also, ended up needing back exercises–good chairs can also promote being lazy in that area. Eye strain is a concern, but honestly is the easiest to deal with for me. The worst, which I can’t attribute only to typing, has been arthritis. Treatment for that is expensive and not fun and basically sets a timer on typing. So, I get to set in the air conditioning all day and not do hard labor, but my work still takes a physical toll on my body. You will get older, and things will happen. Mentally, doing 100 hours a week isn’t leaving much time to relax or enrich your mind or do many things you might regret missing out on later.

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                                                                      I think we’re talking far less about this than we should be doing. Covid gave me serious RSI, shoulder and neck problems (or made it all come to light), because suddenly you don’t even walk to the coffee machine anymore, drive to work and talk to people. You can do everything online, including your hobbies. Which is very convenient, but will completely destroy your body. And all around me it looks like people are using computer mice like RSI is non existing, while I’m struggling to even write for longer times.

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                                                                      100 hours of coding is very unlikely to be more than 50 hours of typing. At the most.

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                                                                        Even so, factor in the reading fine print and the mousing (if you’re a GUI IDE hippie like me) and sitting still in a chair … it’s bad news in the long run.

                                                                        (The thing that messed up my ulnar nerve wasn’t the typing, it was sitting for long periods of time with my forearms resting on the armrests of my chair. Armrests are evil.)

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                                                                    What’s the benefit of running Kubernetes vs. say… very well-behaved systemd services deployed with NixOps? You can do “declarative infrastructure” with both, but Docker-style whole OS containers are pretty bad for composability compared to Nix, even given tools like docker-compose. Still not as bad as trying to compose VMs, though.

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                                                                      I’m not a kubernetes expert but this is an apples and oranges comparison. Systemd doesn’t do any kind of multi system reasoning, no HA, load balancing, etc, for example.

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                                                                        I was specifically wondering about the multi-system deployment you can do with NixOps, not systemd. systemd services managed on multiple hosts with a NixOps declarative network.

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                                                                          The NixOps page on the Nix wiki is “sparse”.

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                                                                            It’s one tool among many similar (morph, krops, etc) now, and I was looking for a somewhat “experienced with both” opinion since I’ve mainly had experience with Nix and not kubes. I was sure there were lobsters who have tried both kubes and Nix-style deployment, but maybe I’m wrong.

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                                                                              Oh, mostly I was really interested in learning about it and a blank page made me sad.

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                                                                                Yeah, totally fair. Did you check out the manual? FWIW the documentation story with Nix has been gradually improving but lots of stuff is generally in a manual format right now…

                                                                                Also, NixOps likes keeping local state in the form of a SQLite database. There are alternatives available that don’t require one, but I’ve only ever used NixOps (even though flakes make me more interested in the alternatives)

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                                                                      I keep rewriting this response.

                                                                      He seems to understand a waypoint on where cloud computing is going. I’m an AWS user, so I can only really speak in those terms. Those nodes will disappear as things migrate into Fargate. EKS will be replaced by ECS. You’ll have a central configuration file of all your resources written for Photon. AWS will roll out more product offerings that will reduce the types of containers you do make until you’re left with only the proprietary code that your business writes and sells as a service. I didn’t really understand what the re:Invent keynotes were about last year. I spent the year fiddling with k8s and containers and it all slowly became clear what AWS was really trying to become. I’ve been worried about resume polishing and maintaining control of things instead of having someone provide well thought out integrated solutions so that there’s more focus on development and adopting new technologies that make the product I sell better at a faster pace. I still love poking around at things at a lower level in my free time, but what I get paid to do is changing entirely and I’m going to have to adapt to that.

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                                                                        I broadly agree with this, although I will say that kube on Google cloud as GKE is already sufficiently managed that for the most part it just works as a place for declarative application deployment. The downside of kube is trying to operate the clusters yourself (for the most part).

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                                                                        I wanted to stop using my phone for video calls, so I also went researching. The linux information I found was confusing, so I just took a leap and ordered the Logitech Brio. I hooked it up with USBC. It took me a couple of hours to understand UVC, but in the end it works just fine in 1080p. It’s supposed to do 4k, but I don’t really care about streaming that kind of quality.. most of the people on the other end are on phones or laptops that aren’t 4k. I had some Jabra Elite 75t Active earbuds sitting around, and that was a waste of time. The Jabra subreddit is imformative on the brand. Linux support for bluetooth profiles with mic support is severely lacking and seems stuck in arguments. The brio presents it’s mics in two ways, one showing up as SPDIF. Choosing that and doing a little tuning with someone on the other end of the call settled it. Viber (I have to.) doesn’t let you choose the video resolution anyway. I can mute myself when I’m not talking if it’s not just one-to-one. Ubuntu 20.04.

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                                                                          Jabra Elite 75t Active earbuds sitting around, and that was a waste of time.

                                                                          I’m curious if you tried with one of their Link adapters, or not? They had some discounts on Amazon, but I want to try with one of their Link 380 adapters. Based on what I’ve read on the Jabra subreddit, the use of one of those adapters with the consumer headphones and earbuds will make an improvement (although it’s unsupported.)

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                                                                            Well, mine won’t firmware update, and it seems to be a common problem. Reading the subreddit gave me an idea that there are lots of such issues and their usual resolution was to defer the conversation somewhere private and offer warranty replacement. That isn’t viable for me. They’re sold as bluetooth earbuds and shouldn’t need a special dongle. If I replace them I’m looking at Sony or Bose.

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                                                                          We forward our email out of AWS to a server on Linode. The server has a good reputation and is only 20$/month. We deliver over 250k emails a month this way and only had issues twice in around 7 years. Simple and much cheaper than third party email services.

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                                                                            To me it looks like you’ve saved ~$8000 over 7 years.

                                                                            Depending on your staffing costs, that could be worth the extra setup and two call-outs for debugging.

                                                                            It wouldn’t be much of a saving if you were paying staff US rates to do it, though.

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                                                                            just a fyi, you can do all of the apt-* commands as just apt now (apt install package)

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                                                                              Thanks. The muscle memory isn’t easy to rewire ;)

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                                                                              It’s my experience that you have to go to the developers menus on the phone, turn adb, and then turn on adb over the network. At that last point it shows a warning that what you’re doing is dangerous. And then when the wireless client tries to connect to the phone, it pops up an authorization dialog. What am I missing?

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                                                                                The writer downloads a huge list of IoT device IPs from shodan and tests how many they can access using the remote ADB. Of course it is common sense to not leave remote ADB on for any device, but people are careless.

                                                                                Maybe you missed that the article downloaded a list of IoT devices, phones were not mentioned on the article at all.

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                                                                                This is for the salespeople that cold-email me and then re-email for ever at an interval of maybe 2 weeks. It has really picked up in the last 6 months or so. Some are actually interesting products, but I feel guilty if I actually respond to them blowing up my email.