1. 7

    Great news! Congrats and kudos to everyone involved!

    Joint statement from NTEN and EFF is now up on the front page of https://savedotorg.org.

    1. 20

      I currently use GNU Guix System and Trisquel as my daily drivers. They are both wholly free GNU/Linux distros that allow me to use my machines in freedom. Trisquel is the more familiar-feeling one (it’s an Ubuntu derivative), and Guix is the one with more radical ideas like purely functional package management (similar to Nix), fully reproducible builds, and lots of other exciting features you can read about on their website and manual. You write declarative package definitions, system configurations, and just about everything in between in GNU Guile scheme.

      1. 5

        I also use GNU Guix on a 2015 chromebook pixel. Soon I want to start hacking on guile-wm and see where the maintainer left off because I’m super close to having a scheme machine. I’m even trying out scsh (and failing because I know fuck all about its interaction model).

      1. 13

        I know people give Tk a lot of grief. But the API is fairly manageable, and with themes can look quite slick and modern https://ttkthemes.readthedocs.io/en/latest/themes.html. The themes are also like an extra line of code to apply with a library like the one in the link.

        1. 8

          No Wayland support (though some fork/port/thing added that via SDL2 apparently??), no screenreader accessibility support (someone tried to integrate AT-SPI in python in 2009 and that seems to be it??)..

          IMO, nothing on that page looks slick and modern, and Tk especially doesn’t feel slick and modern. It’s very 90s.

          1. 9

            Screenreader and accessibility support are both big points, but Wayland? Is that really a relevant problem for a desktop-oriented toolkit today?

            Don’t get me wrong, I’ve been using it on various embedded platforms for at least four years and I’m generally happier than with X11. But so far the Wayland’s killer desktop feature is Xwayland, which I think makes it possible to run Tk apps, too (I haven’t tried it but I don’t see why it wouldn’t work). I know some people who use it successfully, on very specific hardware, and with a pretty specific workflow (not necessarily exotic, but mostly “just a couple of terminals, emacs/vim and a web browser” which I can totally relate to because that’s my pretty much my workflow, too). But by and large, Wayland support seems to be something you can do without for now.

            Can’t say I blame toolkit developers for that. The general state of documentation on Wayland is very bad, and a lot of things are still changing. Unless you work with/on it every day for a few months – either because you’re paid to do it or because Wayland is literally your hobby – there’s no way you can get to do anything useful with it. (Edit: or at least I, for one, don’t see how. I’ve written Wayland-related code on two contracts and it’s been pretty tortuous. It took a lot of research, reading mailing lists and commit messages and poking people on IRC just to figure out the basics There’s no way I would have spent so much of my own free time on it). If I were to write a GUI toolkit today, Wayland support would be just above support for holographic projectors on my todo list.

            Edit: also:

            IMO, nothing on that page looks slick and modern, and Tk especially doesn’t feel slick and modern. It’s very 90s.

            For some of us, that’s a feature ;-)

            1. 4

              I prefer to run without Xwayland. Pretty much never need it, all apps I use daily are GTK/Qt/SDL2/winit and they work great natively. Xwayland didn’t support HiDPI for a long time but there’s a solution now which was the main reason I got rid of it.

              on very specific hardware

              You mean literally anything not powered by a GPU made by the awful green company? :)

              1. 1

                You mean literally anything not powered by a GPU made by the awful green company? :)

                No. I deliberately avoided the awful green company when I built my new desktop two years ago, and Wayland is one of the reasons I did it. It’s still pretty finicky.

                I know it runs great for some people. As with any other project, it’s getting to work on everyone else’s machine that’s hard :-).

            2. 7

              What does slick and modern feel like? Everything else I’ve used for desktop software (Qt, web+js, Cocoa/GNUstep, GNOME, Motif, Delphi) is at best from the 90s too.

              1. 2

                GNOME/GTK3 feels the most modern and polished.

                1. 6

                  Is “modern and polished” supposed to be synonymous with “slow and buggy”?

                  1. 4

                    I’ve never noticed GTK3 being slow and buggy. What exactly is slow and buggy?

                    1. 1

                      In my experience, a concrete example is nautilus (GNOME’s file manager), whether in its full form or as used in open and save dialogs in other applications, like Firefox. The GTK3 version is noticeably slower than the old GTK2 one (or other currently existing GTK2 forks of it)—especially the awful type-to-search functionality which replaced the old behaviour—in addition to being nearly unusable from the keyboard. GNOME’s ever-growing hostility and/or lack of care towards usability for keyboard-driven workflows in GTK3 and their GNOME 3 applications is astonishing.

                  2. 2

                    modern and polished

                    I’d invite you to take a look at the Adapta KDE Kvantum theme for Qt, as well as KDE’s default Breeze/Breeze-Dark.

                2. 2

                  As a person who uses software to get things done, I would take lightweight, easy to develop, maintain, and use over slick and modern literally any day of the week.

                  1. 2

                    These are excellent points. How do other gui frameworks do on accessibility and Wayland support?

                    1. 3

                      GTK only supports accessibility on unix, Qt on Win/Mac too. GTK and Qt are the two toolkits that adopted Wayland first.

                      Smaller frameworks, especially anything “lightweight” that implements its own drawing for everything (doesn’t just abstract over GTK/Win32/Cocoa like wxWidgets does): mostly nope.

                1. 2

                  Having tried just about all kinds of static site generators under the sun—from the more mainstream ones like Jekyll and Hugo to more exotic ones like ssg, ox-hugo, org-page, Org publish, org-static-blog, Haunt, and even a custom one written in Haskell—I’m now back to hand-written HTML files + SSI rules (for simple templating), and love the simplicity. The only thing missing right now is an Atom feed. I wonder if I could use GNU M4 for that, like @technomancy does.

                  Result at https://bandali.eu.org, “sources” at https://git.bandali.eu.org/site.

                  1. 2

                    If your page structure is more or less consistent (looks like it is), you can extract metadata from pages with an HTML parser and generate a feed from it. That approach allows some things that are impossible or unwieldy in the traditional paradigm, such as using an arbitrary paragraph for post excerpt, not the first one.

                    My own generator automates that process: the blog index of soupault.neocities.org/blog is produced by this config. It can dump exported metadata to JSON, which isn’t hard to produce Atom from. I’m still to complete the JSONFeed/Atom generator script good for public release.

                    That said, making a custom page to Atom script using an HTML parsing library that supports querying the data with CSS selectors (BeautifulSoup, lambdasoup etc.) isn’t that hard if making it work for anyone else’s site isn’t a goal.

                    1. 1

                      Indeed; that’s one of the approaches I’m considering. Also, soupalt seems quite interesting, thanks for the links; I’ll check it out!

                    2. 1

                      I also missed a tool to generate RSS from a tree of HTML files. This is how I generate my RSS with a very basic shell script using html-xml-utils:

                      https://her.esy.fun/posts/rss-gen.html

                      1. 1

                        Nice, thanks for sharing!

                      2. 1

                        Any particular reason you switched back to handwriting html files?

                        1. 2

                          Yeah, a few, actually:

                          • I’d like my site setup to be very lightweight, both on the server and on my machine when editing, and use tools that are nearly universally available on all GNU/Linux systems. This rules out things like my custom static site generator written Haskell, since Haskell and its ecosystem are arguably quite the opposite of my two criteria above.

                          • I’d like to have convenient complete control over the generated HTML output, and this is rather hard to come by in most existing static site generators and rules out most markup formats, since almost none are as expressive and flexible as HTML.

                          Aside from the repetitive pre/postamble bits in each file, I find writing plain HTML quite alright, actually. The annoyance of HTML’s lack of built-in templating and simple conditionals can be solved by using SSI directives, which are fairly widely supported across web servers. Alternatively, I’m considering using GNU M4 in place of SSI, if it results in a simpler and cleaner setup. And it fits the two criteria in my first point above too.

                          1. 3

                            These are rather valid arguments. I used to write in plain html too, it’s perfectly fine, especially with an editor’s auto-completion like emmet. Nevertheless, I now mostly write in markdown and enjoy it. Whenever I need something more complex, I just embed html.

                      1. 2

                        Tuning into LibrePlanet 2020, held entirely online this year due to public health concerns with the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.

                        1. 36

                          Twitter is a terrible platform for (among other things) long hand writing, it’s unreadable. I wish people would stop using it for that.

                          1. 26

                            Unlike the other folks who are defending Twitter, I think Twitter isn’t a great format for consuming content, but I also think it reduces friction for producing content, which results in a lot of great content that wouldn’t otherwise exist. For example, foone lays out his reasons for posting on Twitter here:

                            Not to humblebrag or anything, but my favorite part of getting posted on hackernews or reddit is that EVERY SINGLE TIME there’s one highly-ranked reply that’s “jesus man, this could have been a blog post! why make 20 tweets when you can make one blog post?”

                            CAUSE I CAN’T MAKE A BLOG POST, GOD DAMN IT.

                            I have ADHD. I have bad ADHD that is being treated, and the treatment is NOT WORKING TERRIBLY WELL. I cannot focus on writing blog posts. it will not happen.

                            if I try to make a blog post, it’ll end up being abandoned and unfinished, as I am unable to edit it into something readable and postable. so if I went 100% to blogs:

                            You would get: no content

                            I would get: lots of unfinished drafts and a feeling of being a useless waste

                            but I can do rambly tweet threads. they don’t require a lot of attention for a long time, they don’t have the endless editing I get into with blog posts, I can do them. I do them a bunch! They’re just rambly and twitter, which some people don’t like.

                            I’ve tweeted about it before, but I’ve been told this is “unprofessional” and I’m sorry if this surprises you, but I am not a professional writer. of course my hobby writing is going to be unprofessional. Cause it turns out there’s good reasons I’m not a professional writer, and the main one is that I can’t do it.

                            Note that this also address the one direct criticism in the other sub-thread, broken sentences.

                            Personally, if my options are “read foone’s writing on Twitter (or via something that re-writes his Twitter threads)” or “not be able to read foone’s writing”, I’ll choose the former.

                            For some authors, like @jxxf, this is less extreme. He has a blog that he writes on, but the tradeoff is still the same at the margin: because he has a low friction platform available to him, he writes a lot more than he otherwise would and I’m glad he does.

                            I view this the same way I view complaints that making programming easier has dumbed down programming because (for example) people no longer have to understand pointers to produce useful software. I think that’s great, on balance, even if there are some downsides.

                            For people who dislike Twitter so much that they would rather have no content than content on Twitter, they can make that choice for themselves: when they see a twitter.com link, they can not click on it. Some people would prefer to make that choice for other people (as of the time of this writing, this post has downvotes for “spam”, “off topic”, and “broken link”, which are all incorrect IMO) and I don’t agree with that. From looking at lobsters content from twitter, it seems like maybe 2-4 twitter posts get traction each month? IMO, it’s preferable that people who don’t want to read content on Twitter click “hide” 2-4 times a month than to not have this content exist at all or get flagged off of lobsters.

                            1. 7

                              I’ve read this guy’s reasoning before and I just don’t believe it. The guy may have adhd, I have no reason to doubt him, but I think anyone capable of writing super long tweet messages and doing in-depth device break downs can be taught to write blog posts one paragraph at a time.

                              Of course, the dude should write however he likes, I’m not his boss. He may believe what he says, but I think his reason is not real.

                              I agree with your “don’t click on it.” approach as what I love about the internet is our ability to choose and filter.

                              I don’t comment out of a wish to squash this guys stuff and I certainly don’t have to read it. But I comment because I want to understand why people write this way, and want to discourage others from writing this way, as overall it reduces the amount of content people can read, I think. Since this way takes longer to read, is hard to share and respond to thoughtfully.

                              1. 2

                                I have ADHD and I can relate really strongly to the sentiment. My thoughts don’t flow in a natural stream, it’s more spurts and fits. I can sit down and write a blog post, sure, but I’ll be sitting around writing it for 30+ minutes (an eon!) before I either a) get bored, and decide the point I’m trying to make isn’t worth making anyway, or b) realize my thoughts really don’t sound as good as I thought they did, even if they may have some merit. In the end, the blog post ends up getting deleted either way.

                                I’d say using Twitter over a blogpost is more writer-centric than reader-centric, which obviously hinders the audience, but the way foone puts in the previous post really resonates with me:

                                if I try to make a blog post, it’ll end up being abandoned and unfinished, as I am unable to edit it into something readable and postable. so if I went 100% to blogs:

                                You would get: no content

                                I would get: lots of unfinished drafts and a feeling of being a useless waste

                                It’s all about focus, collecting thoughts, and forming them into a singular, discrete narrative - which just does not jive with ADHD behavior.

                                1. 2

                                  Agreed as a fellow. My draft folder is a nightmare, my writing is comment sections and tweets.

                                  Even if I write a blog post it becomes painful, as I usually hyperfocus on it, will spend multiple days on it and end up rereading it too often out of fear for small errors. Tweet chains are much more permissive and raw.

                                  The guy may have adhd, I have no reason to doubt him, but I think anyone capable of writing super long tweet messages and doing in-depth device break downs can be taught to write blog posts one paragraph at a time.

                                  I hate to say it, but if I had a dime for every time a neurotypical person just utters disbelief about how my brain works, I’d have a ton of money on the side.

                                  These effects are very real.

                                  1. 1

                                    I called out the ability to train. I understand ADHD really well. What I meant is that it’s quite possible to train on a writing technique where I write only one sentence or paragraph at a time.

                                    That’s not unique to twitter. I can do the same thing in WordPress or google docs or many other tools that I can adapt to use.

                                    Maybe this author can’t do it, but they can learn to produce content in a way that is still possible given their medical condition.

                                    I was disputing the statement that the author can’t or that it’s impossible given ADHD. I don’t think that’s accurate. Maybe The author doesn’t want to train or learn. That’s cool, that is their prerogative. But the reason they aren’t doing it isn’t ADHD, it’s that the author likes it that way and is unwilling to change.

                                  2. 2

                                    Eh I can believe it. I have ADHD. Sometimes the things you can do, and the things you can’t do, don’t make any goddamn sense. ADHD is an executive dysfunction disorder. Shorter tasks do help…

                                  3. 1

                                    Not an unreasonable insight, but on the other hand if you can write 20 tweets, you can also write the same 20 tweets in a .html page?

                                    By biggest gripe with Twitter is that it doesn’t work in Firefox for whatever reason. Clicking “Show this thread” just doesn’t seem to do anything. Probably due to some Firefox setting I changed or whatnot, but it’s really hard to figure out what (I discovered that copy/paste was broken in Twitter because I disabled the clipboard API, took me a long time to figure out). It can also takes ages to load (although not ridiculously slow, my connection in Indonesia is somewhat low bandwidth/high latency).

                                    It’s all about what your goal is, if you want to just “tweet out in the universe” then by all means, go ahead. But if you want to reach people, then a blog post is probably more effective.

                                    Perhaps this is an opportunity for creating better blogging software that combines the best of both 🤔

                                  4. 9

                                    I like it as a format because it forces you to be concise and make every 280 characters a self-contained point. It’s a fun writing constraint.

                                    1. 13

                                      The endless scrolling, broken sentences (that most attempts have) and crappy twitter experience when JS is disabled doesn’t make it fun to read.

                                      1. 15

                                        I’d suggest maybe turning JS on to make your UX better, but I feel like you’re not going to be receptive to that idea.

                                        1. 4

                                          I suggest nitter, for a far more usable and less hostile experience, without requiring JS:

                                          https://nitter.net/jxxf/status/1219009308438024200

                                          1. 1

                                            Wow - JS or not, that’s a really nice UI.

                                          2. 4

                                            Ok, even with JS on, it’s still a bunch of poorly separated blocks of sentences and sentence fragments.

                                            The comment above mentions a ‘fun writing constraint’.

                                            Writers, find a different way to punish yourselves without punishing your readers. The number of hours a writer spends on a piece is almost certainly less (much, much less) than the number of combined hours that readers spend reading it. Don’t drag your readers through shit for “fun.”

                                            1. 2

                                              Why not? Nobody is forcing you to read it.

                                              If someone wants to have fun writing in a weird format, that’s their prerogative. They don’t have to be maximising your utility.

                                              That said, consider just using something like this: https://nitter.net/jxxf/status/1219009308438024200

                                            2. 1

                                              I disagree that JS should be required to be treated decently on a website.

                                          3. 6

                                            This isn’t a constraint if it’s split over 50 tweets.

                                            This tweet stream is an example of how things aren’t self-obtained points. Almost all of these tweets are meaningless without context before and after.

                                            This story seems made up, like a business fable and even more so because it’s tweeted out in small amounts.

                                            This was interesting the first few times I saw it 13 years ago. But now it’s weird and confusing and shows how valuable friends and editors are to the writing process.

                                            I read a novel in 1999 where the entire story took place in emails. It was an interesting constraint. But the same book today would not be original enough to outweigh the awkwardness of such a constraint.

                                            I am not sure what’s up with these “tweet storms.” I guess they are best for online brands or something since people can like and tweet each item. This author seems quite successful with hundreds of interactions per message. So maybe it makes more money, or sells more ads, or just shows which paragraphs are best liked.

                                            But I just wonder if the author is capable of setting up a blog.

                                            I liked the story, but it took much longer to try to read because of all the scrolling. It’s also harder to read because the lack of paragraphs and grammar and links.

                                            1. 1

                                              Is Exegesis by Astro Teller the book you are thinking of?

                                              1. 1

                                                That looks pretty cool, but not it. I’ve added it to my to read pile.

                                                I was referring to E: a Novel by Matt Beaumont. It was set in present day (2000) office place and was just a simple, relatively ok office drama.

                                            2. 0

                                              I am with you. There is something engaging about the dramatic separation of paragraphs that each read like headlines. Not great for details, but for short stories I find it fun.

                                            3. 2

                                              I think there should be automation for mirroring twitter threads in an accessible format.

                                              I don’t click Twitter links anymore, because my Twitter experience typically goes as follows.

                                              1. Click the twitter.com link on lobsters
                                              2. “If you’re not redirected, click this link”
                                              3. “It looks like you’re browsing without JS. Do you want to continue to basic site? [Yes]” (Yes is the only option provided here.)
                                              4. Get redirected either to the twitter home page or a thread I clicked on 3 days ago on reddit, which was stored in a cookie and did not update correctly.
                                              5. Repeat steps 0-2.
                                              6. Arrive at the page, start reading the content in between the repeating author name, user name, and irrelevant timestamps.
                                              7. Any other Twitter links on that page, go back to step 0.
                                              8. Trying to open any images takes me back to either the author’s page, the twitter home page, or some other thread I clicked on recently.

                                              I think browsing without JS is valid, and no-JS users deserve to be first-class visitors.

                                              1. 1

                                                @bandali says:

                                                I suggest nitter, for a far more usable and less hostile experience, without requiring JS:

                                                https://nitter.net/jxxf/status/1219009308438024200

                                              2. -1

                                                Twitter threads are a de facto standard for publishing and consuming content like this on the internet, the ship has sailed, and it’s just mind-numbingly uninteresting to have to endure replies like this every time one is shared to a content aggregation platform. Get with the times, old man 👴🏻 ✊🏻 ⛅️

                                                1. 3

                                                  De facto standard lol? Since when? Blogging is still alive and well and blog posts outnumber twitter threads 100:1 on lobsters alone.

                                              1. 1

                                                Wanted to have a look at the CFP, but the site doesn’t work without JS; I only see a blank page.

                                                1. 12

                                                  Nice; I hope this will speed Guix up significantly.

                                                  I’ve written a fair bit of Guile on Guix, and the experience has been pretty uncomfortable:

                                                  • It’s slow (it seems to combine the downsides of “being interpreted”-slow with “having a slow compiler”-slow)
                                                  • It spams useless output (compare the “recompiling” messages in the linked thread). Those happen all the time; with Guix’ long list of package modules that means frequent screen-fulls of such output. Python seems to have solved this better – I don’t remember ever running into issues with the *.pyc files.
                                                  • Like Python, Guile code likes to throw stack traces at you. Unlike Python, they’re frequently unintelligible. It doesn’t help that lines are truncated to 80 characters.

                                                  If even just the first point is addressed, it would be a very welcome change. I’m unsure how soon Guix plans to switch over though.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Nice; I hope this will speed Guix up significantly.

                                                    As a fellow Guix user, me too.

                                                    If even just the first point is addressed, it would be a very welcome change.

                                                    Out of curiosity, have you opened bug reports for the latter two points?

                                                    1. 5

                                                      Out of curiosity, have you opened bug reports for the latter two points?

                                                      Yes, I made some efforts.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Great! And thanks for the links, will check them out shortly. And I agree; it is pretty frustrating…

                                                  1. 8

                                                    To visually see the data flow through the algorithm/system, I sometimes like to draw flowcharts or diagrams that sometimes remotely resemble some kind of UML diagram.

                                                    To formally reason about the system/algorithm I’m working on, I use declarative modelling languages like TLA+ and Alloy to model important/complex parts of the system at a high level of abstraction. These languages are often rooted in first-order logic plus some other useful theory (e.g. set theory or relational algebra), allowing you to write abstract models of your system and its structure using mathematical objects like sets, functions, relations, etc, which you can easily reason about without having to get bogged down in implementation details (e.g. what data structure should I use here) at the design stage. The main benefit of using these modelling languages is that they often come with tool support for model checking or model finding, which exhaustively check the entire state space of the model for different kinds of safety, liveness, and deadlock freedom properties you specify, in finite scopes. These so called “lightweight formal methods” are super useful for catching design errors early on, rather than hoping to catch them later during implementation with hand-written unit tests etc (not to say that testing, especially property-based testing with QuichCheck-like tools isn’t useful).

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Kept original title, but poiint that it probably needs systemd.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Well, yeah. Every distro that uses systemd has “decided” to allow (and have) giant process IDs.

                                                      1. 15

                                                        I will learn:

                                                        • More number theory and error analysis so that I can implement the Elusive Eight.
                                                        • More about BATMAN and mesh networking, so that I can keep improving my home network.
                                                        • More about implementation of databases so that I can implement a proper categorical database system.
                                                        • More about Z3’s internals. I think that I have an improvement on the state of the art for 3-SAT but I’m not sure yet because I haven’t grokked every internal representation of Z3.
                                                        • To get better at proposing simple natural arguments which infuriate bigots, so that I can more effectively create self-doubt and insecurity amongst fascists.
                                                        • One additional algorithm for a non-standard Rubik’s Cube. Probably parity fixes for 4x4/5x5 or last-layer for Megaminx.
                                                        • To keep Venus flytraps alive. Surprisingly picky plants, and I don’t have a green thumb.
                                                        1. 4
                                                          • More about implementation of databases so that I can implement a proper categorical database system.

                                                          Can you tell me more about “categorical database system”? I stumbled upon http://math.mit.edu/~dspivak/informatics/talks/CTDBIntroductoryTalk it looks interesting. Thanks!

                                                          1. 5

                                                            Imagine a database that is not built on relational logic, but on categorical logic. Imagine not just graph databases, but databases which store hypergraphs with path equivalence; that is, databases in which categories are the objects being searched and stored.

                                                            Alternatively, imagine a language for expressing categorical ideas. I keep coming back to Hagino CPL, a language in which one writes lengthy categorical expressions, and retrieves a canonicalized shortened categorical expression.

                                                          2. 2

                                                            More about BATMAN and mesh networking, so that I can keep improving my home network.

                                                            Are you using mesh network at home? Which devices are you using for it? Is there a real advantage using a mesh network at home instead that using a traditional network?

                                                            1. 2

                                                              More about Z3’s internals.

                                                              Z3?

                                                              1. 7

                                                                The Z3 Theorem Prover, an efficient SMT (Satisfiability Modulo Theories) solver very popular and widely used in Formal Methods and PLT (Programming Language Theory) research communities.

                                                                Programming Z3 is a nice tutorial with references to other great resources about Z3.

                                                                1. 11

                                                                  A roadster built by BMW in the 90’s and early 2000’s. I also have a somewhat broken one that I need to learn more about it’s internals to get it roadworthy again.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    A SMT/SAT solver by Microsoft

                                                                  2. 1

                                                                    3-SAT is, as far as I can tell, mostly a theoretical device. SAT solver implementations deal with arbitrary clauses (but have special optimizations for 2- and sometimes 3- clauses). I’d recommend looking at minisat/glucose/cadical rather than Z3 if you’re into pure SAT because Z3 is a SMT solver and is literally orders of magnitudes more complex than a SAT solver.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      To keep Venus flytraps alive. Surprisingly picky plants, and I don’t have a green thumb.

                                                                      I was endlessly fascinated by these as a young man and killed a great succession of them, probably due to over-feeding.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        To get better at proposing simple natural arguments which infuriate bigots, so that I can more effectively create self-doubt and insecurity amongst fascists.

                                                                        This is something I’ve been thinking about for a while as well. Do you think they are open to the voice of reason/argument?

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Cool. Reminds me of @romanzolotarev’s ssg.

                                                                        1. 4
                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Quoting the original submission text by @xyz which has now disappeared because of the merge:

                                                                            I have two .org domains for personal projects (badactor.org & kushtaka.org) and I’m wondering if anyone has suggestions for what to migrate them to. I’d like to do redirects and change links as soon as I can to get in front of this.

                                                                            I’m also planing on treating .org as scorched earth when suggesting TLDs. It seems the best strategy for the future is staying in the orbit of .com even if the domain name is longer, as a sale of .com would piss off BigTechCO.

                                                                            I realize this is pessimistic but I’m just trying to “vote” with my dollars.

                                                                            Thoughts? Plans? Thanks!

                                                                            I personally don’t have a good answer to this, but I’ll share my 2¢ anyway.

                                                                            Firstly, I hope this serves as a big enough sign that the internet as we know it now is somewhat broken, and we need to re-imagine at least parts of it. I hope this brings attention to projects like OpenNIC and GNUnet that are aiming to do that with interesting approaches, and could definitely use more, manpower.

                                                                            In the mean time, I personally use an eu.org address for my personal site as an interim solution, realizing full well that eu.org is just like any other .org domain and subject to any potential new travesties and hardships yet to come. But at least this way that’s one less direct payment to whoever operates .org.

                                                                            In general I’d probably recommend staying away from the all various “new gTLDs” since just about all of them are run by for-profit entities as cash-grab attempts, and do all sorts of nasty things like increasing renewal prices exponentially after luring in users with cheap registration prices.

                                                                            Potentially the TLDs safest from these are country-specific TLDs, i.e. ccTLDs. Someone has done some extensive research (behind self-signed cert) looking into just about all of them, and has put together a list of the better ones in their opinion. I’d personally look into those with better track records like CZ.NIC and DENIC, in charge of .cz and .de respectively, and others run by interest associations or not-for-profit coops.

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                                                                              FWIW, I liked the PDF link you’d just posted better; as it didn’t require me to run nonfree JS to read the slides.

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                                                                                apologies, the original link were the slides the speaker used to give the talk but there was a mistake which was corrected in the slideshare copy.

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                                                                                  Ah, I see. I wish the speaker would fix their slides then. :)

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                                                                                  Lol

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                                                                                  Private video.

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                                                                                    Video has been made public.

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                                                                                      Oh! Didn’t realize someone else already posted this here until just now that I posted the announcement on emacsconf-discuss and was about to post it here :)

                                                                                      We have an awesome lineup of talks this year, and I’m very excited for November 2.

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                                                                                        Yes you do, bandali. Congrats and wish you a huge turn up!

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                                                                                          Thanks, Mordo!

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                                                                                          Many thanks to Alain (@munen), Phil, and others involved in putting this satellite/sister event together!

                                                                                          Since the space is limited, please be sure to RSVP per the instructions in the announcement if you would like to attend.

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                                                                                            Thank you for organicing EmacsConf @bandali and for letting us be a small part of it (^_^)/