1. 3

    One of the things that trip me when I first tried emacs is what I wanted it to do too much without having any clue what was happening. I wanted it to replace by go IDE (GoLand), my JS and Rust tools (VS Code) and work perfectly with the language I was just learning (Elixir).

    After a bunch of copy/paste and like 500 lines in init.el that I didn’t know what they where doing I obviously felt flat on my face.

    Nowadays I’ve come back to it with more curiosity and less expectations. Got it working perfectly for beancount, got rid of the awkward (for me) hotkeys with evil, got the fonts and colors that I like, and now I’m free to explore and grow from here :-)

    The rest of the tools are fine and I’m sure that emacs could replace them, but Idk how nor I need to know right now… I can just enjoy the experience!

    1. 4

      Glad to hear it’s now working for you.

      For those wanting to start, I suggest either:

      The only config I’d recommend from the beginning is (fido-mode), https://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_node/emacs/Icomplete.html .

      1. 2

        If you are looking for something between Doom and vanilla, the author’s prelude starter kit is great. And if you use org-mode, the sci-max kit has some really helpful utilities.

        I personally can’t seem to feel at home adding on to any of the starter kits, but I’ve pulled in some things from both of these to my hot garbage of an ancient config mess. :)

        1. 2

          I think doom is an incredible mix of out of box power, emacs customizability, and evil mode. Even as a power user, distributions ensure I don’t miss out on new features, as my dot files over time are likely to lag behind without a lot of attention.

          1. 3

            Also recommending Doom Emacs. After 20 (25ish?) years of Emacs I switched to Doom Emacs so I could throw away a large part of my homegrown config and not having to maintain it anymore.

            For me it does the same as the i3 window manager and the Fish shell: it has sensible defaults that I am mostly willing to accept to save time on config maintenance. (Ofcourse I still have my own customizations to these tools.)

            1. 1

              Same, as a long-time Emacs greybeard. I switched to Doom and got rid of a lot of garbage that I had accumulated over the years.

      1. 5

        I love videos by Ben Eater!

        They have the quality of being entertaining, VERY educational and technically deep, and yet relaxing! 🤯 I’m not sure I’ve come across other videos like that.

        1. 7

          So relaxing. He’s the Bob Ross of technical videos.

        1. 2

          I’ll be doing some big-ish rewrite. On the orange page I came across the idea of implementing something twice: first to understand the problem and the second as the more polished solution. Well, the codebase of my project works, but the more I work in it the less I want to… it has slowly becoming a hot fragile mess! So the rational is simple, I believe it would take less time to rewrite the whole thing and add new features than adding new features on the current state it is.

          We’ll see how that goes :-D

          1. 2

            IMO that’s the point of a prototype, it’s something you make to figure out if your idea for how to do something is viable and figure out the things you might have failed to consider at the beginning, and then you use it as a model for writing the actual thing. You have to be careful to avoid the Second system effect when rewriting something that already works though.

          1. 10

            This is pretty cool, gets me excited about computing again. I’ve come from a more web/api oriented background and for some time I’ve been curious about hardware/firmware. I’m pretty excited about where we might go with compute in more and more places but most my experience is running cloud services so firmware seems uncharacteristically unattainable compared to web/app stuff for me.

            Does anyone know a meaningful way to get involved that isn’t necessarily working at one of the few large bureaucracies funding hardware, and isn’t collecting anymore raspberry pis?

            1. 5

              I found retro-computing hobby to be a great stepping stone to getting to work on hardware-software interface full time. I started by needing a terminal board with serial interface on one end and VGA plus keyboard on the other. At first I built an existing design by Geoff Graham and then gradually improved its hardware and software. It was good experience learning microcontroller programming and the never ending intricacies of historic VT terminals.

              1. 2

                This sounds so interesting, specifically seeing the interest in retro-computing on circles like sdf.org, gopher and gemini places…

                For me retro computing is not really nostalgia so… if somebody was curious about retro computing, where do you think I’ll be a good place to start? Commodore? Atari?

                1. 3

                  I can only reflect on my personal story of building simple logical circuits out of what was series 74 analogue in the USSR when I was in my early teens. As well as reading amateur radio magazine of the time explaining how to build home computer from Soviet version of 8080. All this led to recent me building primitive CPU from series 74 (to which I finally have unfettered access!) and trying to interact with it via serial terminal. This CPU was closer to Apollo guidance computer than to microcomputers of the 70s, allowing for exciting clock by clock debugging experience.

            1. 13

              I’m no longer able to live like this for the usual reasons (family, kids) but agree with everything here. I’m more likely to burn out from other responsibilities than I ever could from coding. Coding is my main relaxing activity, my main hobby, the thing I spend most unallocated time doing.

              Coding for “work” did break this in me for awhile. Just like reading for school can kill a love of books for awhile. But with some space from toxic environments like school and soul-sucking jobs they have both come back and now I read books and write code for myself again.

              1. 4

                I think that the analogy with reading is a great one. There’s a big difference between doing something because you have to vs. because you want too.

                I’m privileged enough that I still get high at work from coding, intense focus, deep concentration, complicated problems and a huge sense of satisfaction at the other side of the problem. But personally coding is something I do for a living but have a bunch of interests outside of it too (nature, music, reading, finances, radio, RC… kinda too many hobbies 😅)

                But I’m glad that the author enjoys what he’s doing!

              1. 1

                $work:

                • look into CGO and assessing how feasible is to use a vendor provided DLL

                $!work:

                • continue working on a config management product
                • mow the lawn
                • read about customer acquisition
                1. 1

                  ooo tell me more about this config management? everything open source is becoming increasingly hostile and mgmt seems to not be progressing much and never seems to have made it to the “usable in production” stage.

                  1. 1

                    well, it’s really scratching my own itch but this is the gist of it… At work we have software deployed at multiple sites. The configs for these sites are different but also some config values (something like industrial equipment calibrations stuff) changes periodically.

                    I want to (1) not have to be editing text files all the time to update those values. It frightens me to type a wrong value so I’d have have a dropdown of possible valid values instead of editing a text. And (2) I want to allow the “experts” (read, scientists, non-engineers) to edit those values themselves because they know their stuff better and I don’t want to do it ;)

                    So I’m making a little UI that I can throw a JSON at it and it creates an UI to edit those values. I can also “decorate” the config to limit the possible values for a certain field.

                    The config can be read with a plain HTTP GET and a token and when the config is edited it can send a HTTP POST notifying that the config had been updated.

                    So, that’s kind of like what I’m aiming for :)

                1. 21

                  I’d like a much smaller version of the web platform, something focused on documents rather than apps. I’m aware of a few projects in that direction but none of them are in quite the design space I’d personally aim for.

                  1. 6

                    Well, “we” tried that with PDF and it still was infected with featureitis and Acrobat Reader is yet another web browser. Perhaps not unsurprising considering Adobe’s track record, but if you factor in their proprietary extensions (there’s javascript in there, 3D models, there used to be Flash and probably still is somewhere..) it followed the same general trajectory and timeline as the W3C soup. Luckily much of that failed to get traction (tooling, proprietary and web network effect all spoke against it) and thus is still more thought of “as a document”.

                    1. 20

                      This is another example of “it’s not the tech, it’s the economy, stupid!” The modern web isn’t a adware-infested cesspool because of HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript, it’s a cesspool because (mis)using these tools make people money.

                      1. 5

                        Yeah exactly, for some examples: Twitter stopped working without JS recently (what I assume must be a purposeful decision). Then I noticed Medium doesn’t – it no longer shows you the whole article without JS. And Reddit has absolutely awful JS that obscures the content.

                        All of this was done within the web platform. It could have been good, but they decided to make it bad on purpose. And at least in the case of Reddit, it used to be good!

                        Restricting or rewriting the platform doesn’t solve that problem – they are pushing people to use their mobile apps and sign in, etc. They will simply use a different platform.

                        (Also note that these platforms somehow make themselves available to crawlers, so I use https://archive.is/, ditto with the NYTimes and so forth. IMO search engines should not jump through special hoops to see this content; conversely, if they make their content visible to search engines, then it’s fair game for readers to see.)

                        1. 4

                          I’ll put it like this: I expect corporate interests to continue using the most full-featured platforms available, including the web platform as we know it today. After all, those features were mostly created for corporate interests.

                          That doesn’t mean everybody else has to build stuff the same way the corps do. I think we can and should aspire for something better - where by better in this case I mean less featureful.

                          1. 4

                            That doesn’t mean everybody else has to build stuff the same way the corps do. I think we can and should aspire for something better - where by better in this case I mean less featureful.

                            The trick here is to make sure people use it for a large value of people. I was pretty interested in Gemini from the beginning and wrote some stuff on the network (including an HN mirror) and I found that pushing back against markup languages, uploads, and some form of in-band signaling (compression etc) ends up creating a narrower community than I’d like. I fully acknowledge this might just be a “me thing” though.

                            EDIT: I also think you’ve touched upon something a lot of folks are interested in right now as evidenced by both the conversation here and the interest in Gemini as a whole.

                            1. 3

                              I appreciate those thoughts, for sure. Thank you.

                            2. 2

                              That doesn’t mean everybody else has to build stuff the same way the corps do.

                              I agree, and you can look at https://www.oilshell.org/ as a demonstration of that (both the site and the software). But all of that is perfectly possible with existing platforms and tools. In fact it’s greatly aided by many old and proven tools (shell, Python) and some new-ish ones (Ninja).

                              There is value in rebuilding alternatives to platforms for sure, but it can also be overestimated (e.g. fragmenting ecosystems, diluting efforts, what Jamie Zawinski calls CADT, etc.).


                              Similar to my “alternative shell challenges”, I thought of a “document publishing challenge” based on my comment today on a related story:

                              The challenge is if the platform can express a widely praised, commercial multimedia document:

                              https://ciechanow.ski/gears/

                              https://ciechanow.ski/js/gears.js (source code is instructive to look at)

                              https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=22310813 (many appreciative comments)

                              1. 2

                                Yeah, there are good reasons this is my answer to “if you could” and not “what are your current projects”. :)

                                I like the idea of that challenge. I don’t actually know whether my ideal platform would make that possible or not, but situating it with respect to the challenge is definitely useful for thinking about it.

                                1. 1

                                  Oops, I meant NON-commercial! that was of course the point

                                  There is non-commercial content that makes good use of recent features of the web

                            3. 4

                              Indeed - tech isn’t the blocker to fixing this problem. The tools gets misused from the economic incentives overpowering the ones from the intended use. Sure you can nudge development in a certain direction by providing references, templates, frameworks, documentation, what have you - but whatever replacement needs to also provide enough economic incentives to minimise the appeal of abuse. Worse still, deployed at a tipping point where the value added exceed the inertia and network effect of the current Web.

                              1. 2

                                I absolutely believe that the most important part of any effort at improving the situation has to be making the stuff you just said clear to everyone. It’s important to make it explicit from the start that the project’s view is that corporate interests shouldn’t have a say in the direction of development, because the default is that they do.

                                1. 2

                                  I think the interests of a corporation should be expressible and considered through some representative, but given the natural advantage an aggregate has in terms of resources, influence, “network effect”, … they should also be subject to scrutiny and transparency that match their relative advantage over other participants. Since that rarely happens, effect instead seem to be that the Pareto Principle sets in and the corporation becomes the authority in ‘appeal to authority’. They can then lean back and cash in with less effort than anyone else. Those points are moot though if the values of the intended tool/project/society aren’t even expressed, agreed upon or enforced.

                                  1. 1

                                    Yes, I agree with most of that, and the parts I don’t agree with are quite defensible. Well said.

                            4. 2

                              Yes, I agree. I do think that this is largely a result of PDF being a corporate-driven project rather than a grassroots one. As somebody else said in the side discussion about Gemini, that’s not the only source of feature creep, but I do think it’s the most important factor.

                            5. 5

                              I’m curious about what direction is that too. I’ve been using and enjoying the gemini protocol and I think it’s fantastic.

                              Even the TLS seems great since it would allow some some simple form of client authentication but in a very anonymous way

                              1. 7

                                I do like the general idea of Gemini. I’m honestly still trying to put my thoughts together, but I’d like something where it’s guaranteed to be meaningful to interact with it offline, and ideally with an experience that looks, you know… more like 2005 than 1995 in terms of visual complexity, if you see what I mean. I don’t think we have to go all the way back to unformatted text, it just needs to be a stable target. The web as it exists right now seems like it’s on a path to keep growing in technical complexity forever, with no upper bound.

                                1. 9

                                  I have some thoughts in this area:

                                  • TCP/IP/HTTP is fine (I disagree with Gemini there). It’s HTML/CSS/JS that are impossible to implement on a shoestring.

                                  • The web’s core value proposition is documents with inline hyperlinks. Load all resources atomically, without any privacy-leaking dependent loads.

                                  • Software delivery should be out of scope. It’s only needed because our computers are too complex to audit, and the programs we install keep exceeding their rights. Let’s solve that problem at the source.

                                  I’ve thought about this enough to make a little prototype.

                                  1. 5

                                    It’s of course totally fine to disagree, but I genuinely believe it will be impossible to ever avoid fingerprinting with HTTP. I’ve seen stuff, not all of which I’m at liberty to talk about. So from a privacy standpoint I am on board with a radically simpler protocol for that layer. TCP and IP are fine, of course.

                                    I agree wholeheartedly with your other points.

                                    That is a really cool project! Thank you for sharing it!

                                    1. 4

                                      Sorry, I neglected to expand on that bit. My understanding is that the bits of HTTP that can be used for fingerprinting require client (browser) support. I was implicitly assuming that we’d prune those bits from the browser while we’re reimplementing it from scratch anyway. Does that seem workable? I’m not an expert here.

                                      1. 6

                                        I’ve been involved with Gemini since the beginning (I wrote the very first Gemini server) and I was at first amazed at just how often people push to add HTTP features back into Gemini. A little feature here, a little feature there, and pretty soon it’s HTTP all over again. Prune all you want, but people will add those features back if it’s at all possible. I’m convinced of that.

                                        1. 4

                                          So you’re saying that a new protocol didn’t help either? :)

                                          1. 4

                                            Pretty much. At least Gemini drew a hard line in the sand and not try to prune an existing protocol. But people like their uploads and markup languages.

                                            1. 2

                                              Huh. I guess the right thing to do, then, is design the header format with attention to minimizing how many distinguishing bits it leaks.

                                        2. 1

                                          Absolutely. There is nothing very fingerprintable in minimal valid http requests.

                                    2. 5

                                      , but I’d like something where it’s guaranteed to be meaningful to interact with it offline

                                      This is where my interest in store-and-forward networks lie. I find that a lot of the stuff I do on the internet is pull down content (read threads, comments, articles, documentation) and I push content (respond to things, upload content, etc) much less frequently. For that situation (which I realize is fairly particular to me) I find that a store-and-forward network would make offline-first interaction a first-class citizen.

                                      I distinguish this from IM (like Matrix, IRC, Discord, etc) which is specifically about near instant interaction.

                                      1. 1

                                        I agree.

                                  2. 2

                                    Have you looked at the gemini protocol?

                                    1. 2

                                      I have, see my other reply.

                                  1. 7

                                    White knuckling an interview for an internal full time software development position with a team I’m excited about that’s 100% remote work.

                                    1. 5

                                      I just went through a bunch of interview myself and at the end none of the offers where any more attractive than what I currently have, but I found that not caring is the best strategy (at least for me), i.e. “it’s ok I don’t get this job”, simply because it helped me take the technical interview not as an “interview” but as a problem or puzzle to solve! And I actually had quite some fun working on those puzzles!

                                      Wish you the best of luck!

                                      1. 2

                                        Thanks very much. I’m less concerned about the technical side and more about the ‘soft’ side which can be super challenging here.

                                      2. 3

                                        White knuckling

                                        good luck!

                                      1. 3

                                        I loved the idea of giving an individual email alias per service and also the running your own mail server is an issue mostly for sending emails!

                                        I’m having brain thoughts now! 🤔

                                        1. 2

                                          Just finished a 3 day hackathon at my company doing a bunch of stuff that I wouldn’t do in a regular day to day… time to chill!

                                          1. 3

                                            Rebuilding some of my self hosted docker applications using podman on CentOS 8.

                                            Also taking another swipe at the programming problem I’ve been stuck on forever now that I’ve found this simplified explanation of how to implement a depth first search.

                                            Why do engineers always present the most complicated explanations for everything in the name of theoretical perfection? :)

                                            1. 1

                                              I think that your question might be satirical or rhetorical… but I don’t know if they (engineers) can help themselves. Being able to simplify something technical is crazy hard! (I keep trying to share with my wife what I did at work, only to lose her 10 seconds into my explanation :)

                                              Reminds me of Albert Einstein’s quote “If you can’t explain it to a six year old, you don’t understand it yourself.”

                                            1. 1

                                              I’m building a homebrew groceries/recipes software to track stuff in my pantry.

                                              I’m learning Lua and ncurses on the process and also remembering how much I love programming just for the fun of it!

                                              1. 10

                                                Celebrating my anniversary and studying for my Amateur Radio Technician license!

                                                1. 2

                                                  Congrats and welcome!! Are you doing technician or general?

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I’m going for technician, but I’m debating doing the general element as well. Having access to HF would be a lot of fun!

                                                    1. 2

                                                      yeah! I took general for the HF access. I studied a few days for the Technician but the morning of the exam I read the no-nonsense guide for general and took both exams and passed them both :-)

                                                      TBH I really didn’t learned everything that I should have for the General but I see it as a license to learn! So no I can learn by doing, even in HF :-)

                                                      In any case, good luck and 73!!

                                                      https://www.kb6nu.com/product/no-nonsense-general-class-license-study-guide-for-tests-given-between-july-2019-and-june-2023-pdf-version/

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Very nice!! You’ve convinced me to do both, thank you very much for the link!

                                                        Did you take the written or virtual exam?

                                                        1. 2

                                                          virtual exam, it was pretty straight forward and not that stressful!

                                                  2. 2

                                                    Good luck on your Ticket

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Work: Implementing a decoupled UI for a service in localhost, frontend using react/electron and backend using golang and both talking via ws

                                                    Personal: Clean up laptop, play around with radio and DMR, work on Elixir project

                                                    1. 4

                                                      In my spare time will be setting up a NAS on my RockPro64 with FreeBSD. This is a learning project to get to know the OS and at the same time I am hoping to get a backup solution finally running from my home.

                                                      Depending on the time I might play around with ZeroTier also to access the machine outside of home network.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        FreeBSD is awesome! I really enjoyed reading their official documentation. It feels like back when linux was simpler and understandable (slackware, rc files, linux 2.2, no EFI, etc…) and gives you a pretty good idea of why FreeBSD.

                                                        Good luck!

                                                      1. 2
                                                        • Starting a new job!
                                                        • Ricing my Arch installation and doing so by reading the manuals for zsh, vim, mutt, and a few others.
                                                        • Making a few BNC cables for indoor antenna to be used by rtl-sdr
                                                        • Finish setting up desk with new company computer
                                                        • Clean the kitchen (recurring job! :-P )
                                                        1. 1

                                                          Any ideas when message reply notifications will come back? Without that, you can’t have a dialogue without polling every story that you’ve commented on and that’s likely to make the quality of discussions suffer a lot.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I’ve exhausted DigitalOcean’s support for their managed database service, so it’ll happen as soon as I can get a couple hours to stand up a database on a vps. Your threads page is maybe a more convenient place to look for replies in the meantime.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              Any update on this? Since the migration, I’ve seen a noticeable drop in the depth of discussions. Even when I dig into the ‘Your Threads’ page and reply, it’s pretty rare for the person that I reply to will do the same. The ‘Replies’ link is still there, so people may not realise that it doesn’t actually work anymore and it requires a lot more effort to find replies.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I would be nice if you can share the issues of DO’s managed database, so we can avoid or keep an eye on it when using managed database in side projects. Is it just being slow in general, or limiting QPS to lobsters.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  I’ve been talking about it in the chat room since the move. Our problem is a combination of the issue explained in the post (MySQL doesn’t push the where clause down into the view, so does a full table scan of all 300k comments instead of using an index to look at ~4 rows) and general slowness, which may be due to particularities of server config, other mariadb/mysql differences, or simply under-provisioning. I traded messages with DO support for a while and was escalated past tier 1 support, but it was not a productive conversation.

                                                                  In typical busy times Lobsters only does 6-7 QPS. DO considered a narrow fixed-width table with a million rows to be large, so maybe they also consider that a high rate, but QPS didn’t explicitly come up. We did immediately bump our head on a max connection limit of 60 when we cut over and had to reduce puma workers (if they can’t get a db connection they throw 500s at the client).

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    So, about that Postgres support… :P

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      It’s tempting. The recursive CTEs could provide nice features for threads. Off the top of my head there’s some maintenance scripts to update (database backup script, any kind of regular maintenance like if vacuum is still a thing), then making very sure we’re not trashing data with a charset mismatch or other subtle difference (how?), and tidying a couple mysqlisms in the codebase (probably done if I get #861 merged). So it’s not a lot more work than standing up mariadb in the first place.

                                                                      @law @skelly @benj @pronoiac - you put your hand up in this thread for sysadmin tasks, do any of you have experience along these lines, time to help update ansible + answer questions as I stand up a box, and a block of a few hours (outside US central working hours) to do the cutover in the next week or so?

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        I don’t mind looking at the PostgreSQL parts specifically (i.e. test/fix the Lobsters codebase) if that’s the way you decide to go, or at MySQL optimisations if we decide to stick with that. I have nothing super-pressing going on at the moment, so I should have enough time, it’s mostly just a matter of wanting to be reasonably sure it’s actually going to be used (the previous PostgreSQL PRs have lingered for quite a while).

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Yes. The vast majority of my coding expertise is in Python, but the rest of what you describe is right up my alley. I can send you more examples of my experience/bona-fides, what’s a good email for you (or would you prefer a DM?)

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I’ll be starting a new job next week (the comment was before I got the job :-) so I think after a week or so I’ll know how my schedule looks like. I’m very familiar with general Linux server config/maintenance from a Linux cert I took a few years ago. If by February you still need help I should be a lot more available

                                                                1. 9
                                                                  • Build Ryzen 7 3700X System This might be my hundredth build but is my first miniITX one so I’m excited!
                                                                  • Continue learning emacs
                                                                  • Rice Arch :-D (I’m planning bspwm/rofi)
                                                                  • Research radio to put together my first HF portable rig
                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    I also built a Mini-ITX Ryzen 3700X system recently :) OptimumTech is a great resource for Mini-ITX builds in general.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    OS: FreeBSD

                                                                    Device: ThinkPad T480s

                                                                    CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-8350U CPU @ 1.70GHz

                                                                    RAM: 24GB

                                                                    WM: WindowMaker

                                                                    Screenshot: here

                                                                    I always have an up-to-date page on my website regarding What I Use.

                                                                    I JUST got my Macbook Pro back from my co-founder, which is Catalina, and I use it only for music/video.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      I love that you are using WindowMaker! For me it mostly brings nostalgia, but I’m curious to know how it works for you! Like, why not OpenBox or Awesome? (example of floating/tilling wms)

                                                                      And what about FreeBSD? I’ve used it for a while but not sure how it would work as a daily driver. How has your experience been?

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        And what about FreeBSD? I’ve used it for a while but not sure how it would work as a daily driver. How has your experience been?

                                                                        I suspect that will vary quite a lot depending on what you actually need to do. I spend a lot of time these days in MS Office, and run Windows on my work laptop and desktop, but my work desktop has 48GB of RAM dedicated to a FreeBSD VM and pretty much all development that I do happens in that VM, occasionally checking things out in the host environment (with or without WSL) if the Windows or Linux CI jobs fail.

                                                                        FreeBSD is gradually falling behind on a few things though. No official .NET Core port means no GitHub Actions, so CI is annoying. No supported Chrome means no supported Electron, so things like VS Code are all best-effort ports of the open source bit and a lot of things don’t work (e.g. no remote extension). No containerd port and so none of the Docker or similar ecosystems reach into FreeBSD-land. The last is the biggest problem because things are increasingly built on top of this. FreeBSD jails would be a much cleaner containerd back end than the horrible mess of namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp-bpf that Linux uses, but someone needs to do the work.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Jails was probably my absolutely favorite feature of FreeBSD. It was so much cleaner and intuitive than linux containers. Ports was also a favorite. Ever since I tried Gentoo, the ability to build my packages from source with whatever flags was something I enjoyed, except when I had to wait a couple of hours to compile X or Gnome…

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I hated ports until Poudriere came along. It’s a shame; Poudriere does everything something like docker-build does, in a very clean way, but was never generalised to anything other than building the ports tree. It’s quite easy to set up Poudriere with a custom LOCALBASE to build a small set of ports and their dependencies with custom options. I’d love to see that better supported by the ecosystem.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Here is mine! https://imgur.com/67sQjkb

                                                                      I realized that having one computer wasn’t enough so one if for work (i.e. reliable) and the other is where I can experiment and be free to break (or take two weeks installing Gentoo!)

                                                                      Work PC: OS: Ubuntu 20.10 CPU: Ryzen 7 2700 Memory: 16 GB

                                                                      Fun PC: OS: Arch Linux (maybe Haiku or ReactOS tomorrow?) CPU: Xeon E3 RAM: 16 GB ECC

                                                                      I love having tons of light so a new screen bar light is on the way and quite likely some new keycaps! :-)