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    I built a keyboard!

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      ONE OF US

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        Edit: added pictures through the process :)

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        Open hardware is critical for user freedom. It is great to see that ARM thinks RISC-V is a viable alternative.

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          I am honestly surprised this hasn’t happened before. Always check what you are downloading from the AUR.

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            Might’ve happened and we don’t know about it yet

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            I rented an Audi about a year ago and was pleased to see that they had assigned a button to almost every major funtion. Touchscreens suuuck.

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              Interesting to see some backlash over this, Dave Winer’s objections have caught my eye in particular.

              On the one hand I’m not sure google should be punishing sites for being http only.

              On the other hand, what is the open web if your ISP can inject ads into a page where there are none?

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                I didn’t see a link to Winer’s objection in the linked article. Do you have a reference?

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                    He sounds a bit, well

                    HTTPS is going to burn huge portions of the open web

                    His entire shtick seems to be that he thinks HTTPS is a conspiracy by Google to control the web, somehow.

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                      He seems to be confounding Google’s motives, which in fairness are probably not altruistic, with the technology itself which is obviously pretty sound.

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                        I’ve literally never seen so much FUD in my life. He must have some fundamental misconception about how HTTPS works. I just don’t see how he could be arguing these points otherwise.

                        I mean, I would be mad if Google really was doing what he thinks they’re doing. But they’re not. He’s also totally missing (ignoring?) the fact that Mozilla is also taking steps matching Google’s.

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                          I hate to say it because I have a lot of respect for his work, but I think basically he’s got a lot of domains and can’t be bothered converting them. I totally get the objections against the way Google are approaching this, but going after https itself is dumb.

                          Why would you think it’s a bad thing that you can guarantee that the site you are viewing has not been tampered with?

                          I’ve seen him call out Mozilla too in fairness.

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                            Meh. Honestly I have no issues with the way Google is approaching this. They (and Mozilla) give plenty of time before making even the tiniest changes, and in the end really all they’re doing is changing the UI to reflect reality.

                            And without them doing that, people exactly like Winer just wouldn’t care.

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                            I’m skimming through, trying to understand it, and he never really states an objection anywhere that I can see. I am familiar with several reasonable objections to the concentration of power created by the CA system and to the burden it imposes on content creators; I just don’t see Winer actually expressing any of them.

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                        On the other hand, what is the open web if your ISP can inject ads into a page where there are none?

                        May be this is better served by adding signatures to the basic HTTP rather than forcing HTTPS everywhere?

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                          Wouldn’t that involve the same trust infrastructure but without actually encrypting the traffic?

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                            Not completely. The benefit is that intermediaries can cache it if required, and clients can verify the signature only when needed. With the forcing of HTTPS everywhere, a lot of caching infrastructure that existed previously has become useless without any alternatives. These are especially important in low bandwidth countries or communities relying on low bandwidth gateways.

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                        Not strictly programming but I like Jason Scott’s talks.

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                          It’s only dead if you follow Apple blindly into the abyss. On other phones it’s not dead yet.

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                            Not yet.. Remember when you could get a smartphone with a keyboard?

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                              Those are only dead if you’re not following Blackberry blindly into the abyss.

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                              I’ll agree there, I want my phone to have a 3.5mm jack. I can’t image how putting the DAC on the cheap end of the equation (the earplugs) can improve quality over a simple and sturdy analog cable with a magnet on one end.

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                                Or Google… I imagine it must be hard at a third party Android device manufacturer to avoid the temptation of following the lead of the two big players.

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                                  Google’s move with the Pixel was particularly shit because they made fun of Apple for getting rid of the jack, then got rid of it themselves.

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                                    I thought you were going to say something about search … I miss Yahoo/Lycos/Hotbot/Dogpile and getting different results that lead to different places. Fuck the search monoculture.

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                                  Remember when they stopped putting serial ports on laptops and the world ended because we lost 5v signals?

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                                    The difference, of course, is that devices with the 3.5mm jack are ubiquitous, even among laypeople.

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                                      And analog. Prior moves to digital that was capable of DRM often led to them getting some DRM. Good to always remember the suppliers don’t have our freedoms in mind.

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                                        Yeah I am surprised this gets shoved under the carpet so much. With digital-out only, vendors can decide what you listen to.

                                        We aren’t quite at the “sorry this app only works with Beats headphones” stage yet but getting rid of the jack opens up this avenue.

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                                          Well, there’s this plus proprietary stuff used to get more money out of customers. Apple is best known of those doing the latter.

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                                        Yeah you don’t have to worry about your baud rate with a headphone jack.

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                                          Laypeople aren’t soldering their own heart monitors either. The people who are will probably find a way to make things work.

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                                        Great news! Very well done. I kind-of jumped from gnusocial because I don’t see ActivityPub on the horizon, mastodon et al seem to be the way forward.

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                                          Mastodon has been using ActivityPub since version 1.6. It’s the preferred protocol now. OStaus is kept for backwards compatibility. https://github.com/tootsuite/mastodon/releases/tag/v1.6.0

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                                          Git hooks are so simple yet so good. I have a static site and use a pre-push to generate the files then sync them over to my hosting provider prior to pushing to my git repo.

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                                            I’m using SyncThing at home. Just mirror and sync a folder across multiple machines.

                                            One downside I see is the lack of storage somewhere else while all laptops are at home. Geographic risk.

                                            It also requires all machines to store the full state. ~100GB in my case.

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                                              One popular differentiation between file synchronization and backups are that you can travel back in time with your backups. What happens if you - or more realistically: software you use - deletes or corrupts a file in your SyncThing repository? It would still be gone/corrupted and the problem would automatically be synced to all your machines, right?

                                              Personally I use borgbackup, a fork of attic, with a RAID 1 in my local NAS and an online repository to which I, honestly, don’t sync too often because even deltas take ages with the very low bandwidth I got at home, so I did the initial upload by taking disks/machines to work …and hope that the online copies are recent ‘enough’ and I can’t really resist the thought that in scenarios where both disks in my NAS and the original machines are gone/broken (fire at home, burglaries, etc.) I would probably loose access to my online storage too. I should test my backups more often!

                                              1. 1

                                                I use Borg too! At home and at work. I also highly recommend rsync.net, who are not the cheapest, but have an excellent system based on firing commands over ssh. They also have a special discount for borg and attic users http://www.rsync.net/products/attic.html

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                                                  Hmm - that’s really not the cheapest!

                                                  3c/gb (on the attic discount) is 30% dearer than s3 (which replicates your data to multiple DCs vs rsync.net which only has RAID).

                                                  1. 1

                                                    True, though S3 has a relatively high outgoing bandwidth fee of 9c/gb (vs. free for rsync.net), so you lose about a year of the accumulated 0.7c/gb/mo savings if you ever do a restore. Possibly also some before then depending on what kind of incremental backup setup you have (is it doing two-way traffic to the remote storage to compute the diffs?).

                                                    1. 2

                                                      Ahh, I hadn’t accounted for the outgoing bandwidth.

                                                      That said, if I ever need to do a full restore, it means both my local drives have failed at once (or, more likely, my house has burned down / flooded); in any case, an expensive proposition.

                                                      AFAIK glacier (at 13% the price of rsync) is the real cheap option (assuming you’re OK with recovery being slow or expensive).

                                                      RE traffic for diffs: I’m using perkeep (nee camlistore) which is content-addressable, so it can just compare the list of filenames to figure out what to sync.

                                                    2. 1

                                                      Eh - I don’t mind paying for a service with an actual UNIX filesystem, and borg installed. Plus they don’t charge for usage so it’s not that far off. Not to shit on S3, it’s a great service, I was just posting an alternative.

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                                                        Yeah that’s fair, being able to use familiar tools is easily worth the difference (assuming a reasonable dataset size).

                                                2. 1

                                                  syncThing is awsome for slow backup stuff. But i wish i could configure it such that it checks for file changes more often. Currently it takes like 5 minutes before a change is detected which results in me using Dropbox for working directory usecases.

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                                                    You can configure the scan time for syncthing, you can also run syncthing-inotify helper to get real-time updates

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                                                    That’s one huge advantage of Resilio Sync. You don’t have to store the full state in every linked node. But until RS works on OpenBSD, it’s a no-go for me.

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                                                    Holy crap this is some crazy shit. 97% accuracy…

                                                    Sounds like for now it only really works in controlled environments - I am surprised it even works at all.

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                                                      Good to see GitHub moving towards properly implementing git…

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                                                        I’m curious in what aspects they have not been! This reads more like “updating the web interface to support an occasionally used git feature” rather than “fixing an incorrect implementation of git in use at GitHub”.

                                                        (Aside: a lot of the people I see using signed commits right now are probably the type who’d eschew a web interface entirely; here’s hope this feature will make it more common!)

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                                                          For me its lack of notes support and the inability to customize a pull request’s merge message template at a repo owner level.

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                                                            I suppose these both also don’t feel like “an incorrect implementation of git” either.

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                                                              It’s pretty clear that proper in benoliver’s comment refers to feature complete, not “correctness”.Though a duck without a bill is probably not correct, not to be ableist.

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                                                                I guess the whole crux of my reply was that it wasn’t pretty clear, but I take your point.

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                                                        The main thing that keeps me away from fish (and zsh iirc) is the lack of rsync tab completion. I don’t know how people manage without it…

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                                                          Works fine with the default included zsh completions.

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                                                            I’m not sure where, but it’s included somewhere in this config I just default to using.

                                                            http://git.grml.org/?p=grml-etc-core.git;a=blob_plain;f=etc/zsh/zshrc;hb=HEAD

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                                                            Looks like the just posted part 2. http://www.bigmessowires.com/2015/07/14/web-hack-analysis-part-2/

                                                            Provides some interesting stuff, but doesn’t shed too much more light on the hack.

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                                                              Running your own Wordpress is like skydiving without a chute. I think if I were locked into WP, I’d go with one of the specialized hosts that take additional measures to prevent and detect such nonsense.

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                                                                I have to agree. There are too many points of failure with WP.

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                                                                Yeah I’m game, big IRC fan. Same nick as here, benoliver999.

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                                                                  I’m not sure I ‘get’ this - how does it improve over RAID, or RAID in a ZFS pool? It tries to use Samba instead of a RAID controller?

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                                                                    Its a userspace tool, while RAID/ZFS is kernel space. Each drive is readable on its own without the rest of the pool. There are options on how many different drives to copy each file onto for redundancy, and drives of different sizes are allowed.