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    1. 4

      Me too. I love it.

      One of the main benefits is having the title and (usually) an overview/description or excerpt. It makes it so much easier to prioritise and filter content before (and often instead of) having to deal with the modern web experience directly.

      1. 2

        Me too. Instead of “still” I would also say that I use RSS more than ever. All the news sources I read I subscribe to via RSS, Atom or JSON Feed.

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        Command line options to convert to new hashes look weird. “Frobnicate blobs”, “climb subtrees”, “use shovels”, “carbon offsets”.

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          I think it’s intended as a joke/funny example.

          1. 1

            Yes. Other parts that made me chuckle:

            Somewhere out there is certainly some developer who actually memorizes SHA‑1 hashes

            and

            The value of write-only repositories is generally agreed to be relatively low

          2. 10

            I think it’s tribute to people creating fake Git manual entries with Markov chains and a 17th century forestry book (and the resulting texts being barely distinguishable from the original man pages).

            (I can’t find the original “fake” generator, but here is a similar page: https://git-man-page-generator.lokaltog.net/)

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              Have you tried the reader mode with Firefox?

              1. 1

                Yeah, but it’s very invasive and will often change far too much IMHO. With this most UI will be mostly intact. Reader mode is great for reading an article. Everything else: not so much.

                1. 3

                  It’s also not available under some conditions and I’ve never been able to figure out exactly what they are. It’s usually fine but no heuristic is perfect.

                  1. 2

                    I particularly like about reader mode that it changes much. :)

                  2. 1

                    Yeah, when it’s available I am more than happy with reader mode. But I will keep this around for the other cases, although they are pretty rare now.

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                    I will actually make it to the very end of SICP, register machines and all.

                    Then try a non-trivial thing in Racket.

                    1. 3

                      Awesome! Racket is the first language I will learn some years from now when I attain Journeyman level in Python.

                      I’m very fascinated by both the language itself and the rich deep ecosystem that exists around it. Really impressive stuff!

                      1. 1

                        Why delay? It’s sufficiently different that I don’t think learning racket will interfere with improving python.

                        1. 2

                          Because I have found that when I’m trying to learn something as complex as a programming language, simultaneously cramming other syntaxes and paradigms into my head lessens my ability to master the one I’m currently working on and with. I just wrote a blog post about this, posted under separate cover :)

                          As I’ve said elsewhere, this isn’t forever, but I do need to rein myself in long enough to get out of the hole I’ve dug for myself.

                      2. 3

                        Try nanopass framework and compite to wasm!

                        1. 3

                          Since the David Beazley talk posted here a few weeks ago where he wrote a wasm interpreter in python during the talk, I have been keen to play with it. I shall give this a go - thank you for the recommendation!

                          1. 4

                            Since the David Beazley talk posted

                            I missed that. Can you post a link please?

                      1. 6

                        So I really enjoyed this video, but when I clicked on it I was kinda hoping it would talk about the circuitry inside the microprocessor rather than talking about interfacing from the outside, which I already have a decent grasp on.

                        But the presentation is outstanding, he planned all the diagrams, sheets, and wires so well! I’ll have to watch more of these. The only problem is then I’ll wanna play with more hardware again :)

                        1. 8

                          the circuitry inside the microprocessor

                          You can see a basic version in his building an 8-bit breadboard computer! playlist. It’s not 1-1 but I think it gives a beautiful and clear idea of exactly what’s happening down to the level of bits/pins/logic gates.

                          1. 2

                            In a similar vein, this series on building a computer out of relays is pretty interesting too: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_1HsIiuOfg3QA91DUd9kGJjQoOHwlt5Q

                        1. 4

                          I really like the iterative deepening approach to teaching/learning because it matches how I learn anyway. First the basics, then dive deeper and deeper. It also seems a good fit for learning something slowly or over a longer time.

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                            Having interviewed a lot of people, SQL is one of those things that everyone thinks they know well and very few actually do. In interviews now, if I see them claiming expertise, I ask if they can do something more than “SELECT * FROM foo” because so often that’s all it takes to “know SQL” on your resume.

                            Good database knowledge can be extremely valuable. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen code that makes four or five round-trips to the DB, grabbing data, processing it client-side, and sending it back that could’ve been done in one round-trip with a well-crafted SQL query.

                            There’s the other side too: I’ve seen some truly awful database designs that have required multiple round trips because the DB designer didn’t understand foreign keys or constraints or whatever.

                            1. 4

                              Depends on how you interview me.

                              If you sit me down with a pen and paper and tell me to write a complex query…. I might well fail.

                              If you sit me down with say sqlitebrowser… and an editor side by side, I will rapidly iterate starting from very simple queries (yes, I will start with select * from foo) to as complex as need be.

                              And yes, I might occasionally refer to the syntax for the gnarlier corners.

                              But I will get it done pretty rapidly in a single very well crafted query.

                              Conversely, I’m a true believer in what CJ Date has been saying for decades…. so if you allow me to redesign the table definitions…. you’d be shocked by how simple my queries will be.

                              1. 3

                                Imo one of the best arguments against relying on ORMs is performance: in some situations a CTE or window function can get you one or two orders of magnitude improvement over a naive orm solution.

                                1. 2

                                  Nothing prevent you from implementing those edge case in your ORM though. I personally use SqlAlchemy, and I feel like it cover what I need as-is 90% of the time, and the 10% of the time left it gives me the tool to build more complexe queries and even allow me to keep using the “object mapping”. SqlAlchemy supports CTE and Window function!

                                  For even too complexe query, it might also be possible to wrap them into SQL Function and simply map your ORM to this function.

                                  1. 2

                                    Oh, to clarify, I think ORMs are great, I just don’t think it’s great to rely on them. They do 90% of the things for you, but you need to know SQL for the other 10% of cases. Some things aren’t like that, where there’s not such a wildly significant benefit as knowing SQL gives you in this case.

                                    1. 1

                                      This is very true. It’s also helpful to know (in rough terms) what the ORM is doing under the hood, something that’s only really possible if you understand the SQL behind the operations.

                                    2. 1

                                      Yep, Peewee orm also supports things like CTE, window functions, insert/on conflict, etc. The query builders for both libraries are very flexible, but you pretty much have to know SQL and then translate it into the APIs the query builder exposes. For experienced programmers this is no problem, but someone less fluent with SQL is going to have no idea how to use this advanced functionality, regardless of how it is exposed.

                                      1. 1

                                        Definitely! My point was mostly about ORM and “advanced”/performant SQL not being mutually exclusive.

                                        1. 1

                                          I like ORM or query builders not because I don’t know SQL, but rather because I detest the SQL syntax. I wish there were a better relational language. Maybe Tutorial D in front on Postgres’ storage engine.

                                  2. 2

                                    What would you consider beyond “SELECT * FROM foo"? I don’t touch SQL on a daily basis, but I could throw together a left, right, and full join if I needed to, and I’m aware of how to use subqueries. What SQL skills would someone have in order for you to consider them competent / good at SQL?

                                    1. 4

                                      JOINs, GROUP BY, that sort of thing. If they’re going to be building DBs, understanding indexes, unique constraints, and foreign keys.

                                      If you’re gonna be my lead database programmer/DB admin/DB architect, I’d want to see understanding of good database design (normal forms, good foreign key relationships, good key choices), CTEs, triggers (in your preferred database), being able to spot when a full table scan might happen, understanding when and how to use precomputed values for future queries, and so on.

                                      1. 4

                                        The use of aggregate functions, defining new aggregate functions, the various joins, the 3VL truth table, grouping, subselects, CTEs, that kind of thing.

                                        1. 3

                                          I like asking candidates

                                          • find me the employee with the highest salary (entire row, not just the salary) - will usually use sub select with max.
                                          • find me the employee with the second highest salary - expected to use window function but can still get away with two subquries.
                                          • find me the employee with the second highest salary in every department - expected to use window with partition.

                                          If you found a guy that thought about equal values ( rank / dense rank / row number ) you know he did some work. Hire him.

                                          Haven’t touched joins yet.

                                          1. 2

                                            I don’t know window function, but believe that I know join

                                            1. 3

                                              It’s well worth the time learning window functions.

                                              As Maruc Winand (who created use-the-index-luke.com and the newer modern-sql.com) says in his talk on Modern SQL there’s life before windows functions and life after windows functions.

                                            2. 1

                                              I’d much prefer lateral joins be used in some of these cases.

                                            3. 1

                                              I’ve seen no mention yet of EXPLAIN queries (Or similar operation in other RDMS than Postgresql?). Never been doing a lot of SQL in the past, but lately I had to work with some complexe queries over large dataset and most of my learning involved playing with EXPLAIN [ANALYZE], understanding the result and tweak the base query to fix the performance issue. Once you understand that, you can work from there to find the best index, where to place subqueries, set large enough working memory, etc.

                                          1. 5

                                            Now I’m actually curious, does anyone learn programming from a book?

                                            I figured books (and tutorials) are a good way to just get started if you can’t get there on your own, and I guess you can learn new tricks & deepen your knowledge with the help of a book after you’ve got the core stuff figured out. Between the getting started stage, and the deep end, you just have to learn programming by actually programming eh?

                                            I’m not sure people in universities learn programming from books either. Well, my lil’ sister just started studying CS. There are books, but they’re rather supplemental. The core material is lectures and exercise.

                                            1. 6

                                              I learned from books (and magazines) in addition to writing programs. But this was back in the mid-80s when I was in high school. The only source I had were books (and magazines [1]). No one else I knew knew anything about computers (with the exception of one friend, and he had a different computer than I did).

                                              [1] Byte magazine was one of my favorites [2]. But even the computer I had, which was not popular by any means, had at least two different magazines devoted to it, both of which covered everything from hardware to software.

                                              [2] I recall it having a series of articles about compiler construction and parsing techniques. Mid-80s Byte magazines made incredible readings. By the late 80s it had morphed into a general PC rag, but I was in college at that point.

                                              1. 2

                                                “Getting started” isn’t learning? I learned C in the early 80s with a copy of K&R in one hand, doing the exercises. Or at least it sure felt like learning. Now, I didn’t get proficient/skilled without a ton of practice and subsequent help from more experienced mentors, but that strikes me as something different.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Books are an invaluable tool for learning, but they can’t do everything. Some people are just plain bad at teaching or writing or they have other incentives for writing aside from education.

                                                  The principal point I think is that someone (maybe several people) with wider and deeper knowledge on a subject present their knowledge for you to learn from.

                                                  My first approach when I want to learn something is to read about the subject - and we also have other media too. I don’t have to stumble along, making mistakes, going down the wrong path, wasting time on irrelevant material and so on. Others have already done that before. Why wouldn’t you learn from them?

                                                  Later, once I’ve gained some knowledge, I can explore and expand, go deeper or focus on topics that are interesting or relevant. Everyone is different though and some people do benefit and thrive from a hands-on, practical approach first.

                                                  Personally, I want pointers and relevant background and guidelines from others who have studied the subject already. I don’t want to have to learn by doing all my own research up front over and over and over.

                                                  You absolutely need to reinforce that knowledge with action, experimentation, application though. I think the best approach for me is to have that practice during the teaching - relevant exercises that push a little beyond the material you’ve just covered works best for me.

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                                                    You have said exactly nothing that discounted what I said. Please don’t piggyback your “let me tell you how awesome I am and how great I think my way of doing things” drivel on my simple response. It’s really pathetic.

                                                2. 1

                                                  I don’t see what you’re getting at. Books only provide information, learning is the responsibility of the reader. I don’t think anybody’s claimed otherwise.

                                                  And it’s the same with literally everything. Nobody learns to drive by reading a book, or learns carpentry from a carpentry book, or learns advanced math by merely reading a book, etc.

                                                  Learning anything requires doing and practicing. Just reading a book or listening to a lecture isn’t going work except maybe for the most trivial things.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    “You won’t learn how to write a novel by reading Betty Azar’s grammar book.”

                                                    1. 1

                                                      I managed to learn quite a lot from books (Various books on programming languages (Java, Python, Perl, …) and others like SICP). Not that I just read the books without writhing anything or using Google, but I got quite far. The main problem is that if you get to choose you’re own “schedule”, you might keep on avoiding more boring but important topics, like in my case computer architecture.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I learned programming from a book, which included lots of code examples, but it was back in 2002 when paper was easier than the internet.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Now I’m actually curious, does anyone learn programming from a book?

                                                          Yes and no. I learn programming languages from books because I want to know more about the semantics than pure examples often provide.

                                                          (Grrr.. hit “post” by mistake…)

                                                          As for programming, it would be unfair to say that learning hasn’t been at least well supplemented by books. It’s certainly a lot of “learn by doing”, but there’s a good mix of learning from others’ experiences as well. It’s a stretch to say I’ve learned programming from books and at the same time it’s accurate to say my programming skills have been enhanced by them.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I would argue the inverse, can you learn programming without “books?” Here I am using “books” to refer to references that an autodidact might employ. I don’t think they can be the sole source of an education, and should be supplemented with real experience. However, they are an important resource early on and, at least in my experience, when continuing to learn. I have been doing this for 20 years now, I am still learning to program - often from books. And while this is not universally true, I have noticed a trend that those who don’t continue to read tend toward stagnation. I can also think of counter examples on both sides of that.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I spent a good chunk of my life in some places, esp in rural areas, without access to a computer or the Internet. I could occasionally get an IT gift from well-off relatives (often chose wrong), find outdated books on any subject in thrift stores, and get recommendations from some elitist, possibly-fake hackers at times. I had to practice programming in my head, on paper, or (on budget) the dirt. Lots of time doing stuff, screwing up, introspecting, and repeating that process. My biggest concern over time was how many bad habits I might have picked up from wrong, mental model of how things actually worked. On top of that, total waste that resulted from having no ability to check my work or get feedback on doing it right.

                                                              The habits I developed doing that are probably the reason I still do that to this day with most of the papers and articles. People occasionally are like, “Nick, did you even read the damned article or dig deep into what they said?” Yeah, I probably tried to run through it like I never had access to the actual article or time to do that. I have better excuses for it these days but it could be habitual, too. Double reinforcement. So, it’s possible old habits that worked well enough over decades are hard to ditch. I did in fact learn programming, administration, business advice, speaking, etc from a mix of books and whatever people locally seemed to know about a topic. Cheap paperbacks were all I had for a lot of things.

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                                                              Google’s effort to create a censored search engine for the Chinese market that enables state surveillance.

                                                              My abiding reaction reading this is what utter hypocrisy.

                                                              Surveillance is acceptable when it’s for corporate interests?

                                                              Tracking every possible crumb of data - not only across the internet through analytics. fonts, hosting jquery et.al but physical location too - which is no doubt stored forever in their data centres.

                                                              1. 15

                                                                I wouldn’t say acceptable, but I I think selling ads is a very difference application than state persecution, imprisonment, and execution.

                                                                I mean, I agree is a little bit hypocritical, Google tracks way to much stuff and it’s potentially a bad thing, but collaborating with a totalitarian state known to kill dissidents is way worse.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I think the line being drawn is the technology being used by organizations to kill people who, by our standards, didn’t warrant killing.

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                                                                I really don’t understand why people choose to write on Medium since the reader experience is so awful.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  the reader experience is better than a lot of journalistic places.

                                                                  The alternative for lots of medium content is either on some newspaper website, or on your own blog (or I guess something like blogspot?). Better looks are possible, but require access to some sort of design sense that most people simply don’t have.

                                                                  “But you can make a simple layout that is nicer than Medium”. Well, you can, but they don’t necessarily know this or have the skills to make a simple thing.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Network effect is my guess.

                                                                    Initially medium was a good tool for writers and readers and they grew aggressively and so it’s reputation grew. So many links to medium on reddit, here, HN etc.

                                                                    If you’re interested in getting your links/likes/upvotes/ideas/brand/… across why not go where more people visit?

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    Is that magicless-fallback generally part of libc, or only in OpenBSD? For some reason I assumed the kernel did the fallback in that case.

                                                                    Also, why is it important that shell-scripts can be run, but shell-scripts without a #! cannot? Is it guarding against the case where an evildoer can chmod +x and append evil commands to a non-shell-script whose content the shell would naturally ignore?

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      The magic fallback is a defined part of standard execvpe interface.

                                                                      It’s not particularly important. It’s a relic of the past where bits and pieces of “do what i want” snuck in. The shell, sh, should probably be just another command, but it’s kind of special, and then it was convenient to make it try interpreting x files without headers, and then people wanted every program to behave like the shell does.

                                                                      The net result of littering this feature around is that future compatibility is hard because you can’t really look at or change one piece of code in isolation.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        I don’t know, but if someone’s able to issue chmod +x successfully then can’t they just add a #! at the beginning of the script - whether it’s on disk or in memory?

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Adding +x requires permissions to write the directory inode, whereas adding #! requires write permissions to the file, so it is subtly different.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Adding +x requires permissions to write the directory inode

                                                                            Huh? That’s not the case in any situation I can concoct…consider the existence of fchmod(2), for example.

                                                                        2. 1

                                                                          I can imagine a case where running certain files through certain shell interpreters, as opposed to a language’s interpreter, can be to the attacker’s advantage.

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                                                                          I love it. It’s like Terminus with significantly better curly braces.

                                                                          Also, you have slashed zeroes, which is what all correct-thinking people prefer.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Also, you have slashed zeroes, which is what all correct-thinking people prefer.

                                                                            I use a copy of Droid Sans Mono that I edited to have slashed-zeros. I love the font, but without slashed zeros (or even dot-zeros) it’s useless for coding.

                                                                            Terminus doesn’t render properly on Windows, which is a shame, As Spleen is a bitmap font, I’m guessing I need .fon versions for Windows ?

                                                                            1. 4

                                                                              For those that can’t (or don’t want to) edit fonts cosmix.org have a Droid Sans Mono with both dotted and slashed zero varieties.

                                                                              Arch users can get it from the AUR

                                                                              Powerline version too

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                                                                                Yes, I think .fon is the required format for bitmap fonts on Windows. I’ve generated some .fon files for all sizes here, but I don’t have access to any Windows machine, so I cannot test them. It would be nice if you could try and report results, thanks!

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Ok I’ve had a go. They don’t render in Windows at all. :( Windows just shows ‘Courier New’ when I preview the files. Looking via HEX viewer, it seems that your .fon files are missing extra (repeated) meta-data that Windows seem to need. Thanks tho!

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                                                                              I use and love linux, and have read many things about Linus being abusive and what not. I am on the spectrum and wasn’t diagnosed til my 40s. Looking back on my earlier adult years, I was described as abrasive, obnoxious, and many others.

                                                                              I tend not to suffer fools lightly, but somehow, on my own have learned better self-editing skills. Hopefully Linus will figure this out, because it truly will benefit everyone in the community.

                                                                              1. 11

                                                                                on my own have learned better self editing skills.

                                                                                Any tips? I’m probably in a similar position but am trying to be less of an asshole.

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                                                                                  Wow. I wish I had a great answer for this. Feeling things, ANYTHING, has always been hard for me, but one thing that has always made me feel things is art. Music and cinema are usually where I go. When something in either of those arenas makes me feel something, I reflect on it and think. I think about that feeling and how it might apply to me and others, and I dunno, maybe it’s re-written my brain wiring a little bit.

                                                                                  I guess one basic thing I also do is just not respond sometimes. I give it time, and think about it. When I’m on the internet now, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve started a reply, and then just bailed on it, and never sent it. Or I’ve started a reply, and copied it into my clipboard so I could spend a little time thinking if I really wanted to send it. It’s in the clipboard if I need it.

                                                                                  Whereas 30+ years ago, if I was on my BBS or another, I would just furiously write a reply or a message and just hit save, without thinking. So maybe some of this has come with age, also. Supposedly we get wiser as we get older.

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                                                                                    I am (was?) also in a similar situation. I never insulted people, like Linus, but I would give very blunt feedback, because that’s how I like to receive feedback. It took me a while (I’m in my thirties now) but I eventually recognised that different people respond differently to different styles of feedback. So I would observe other people’s communication styles, and then mimic a person’s style when giving them feedback. It felt dishonest and almost manipulative at first, but I noticed how much smoother my interactions would be, and after a while I could do it without much effort. It made me more effective in teams, and I think my coworkers feel more positive about working with me these days.

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                                                                                      Don’t reply on impulse. Play devil’s advocate when reading your replies. When in doubt, clarify that you are criticizing an idea or a behavior and not attacking the person behind it. If necessary, acknowledge and repeat back what the other person wrote to ensure you are understanding each other before responding.

                                                                                    2. 3

                                                                                      I am on the spectrum and wasn’t diagnosed til my 40s.

                                                                                      This is what surprises me about this post - and your comment. I’m not being judgemental - I’m just ignorant about the condition(s) other than exposure in the media - which must be the worst way to learn about anything.

                                                                                      Linus is married and I expect he has a social circle apart from his professional and technical contacts.

                                                                                      I’m surprised he hasn’t come to realise until now. Still good for him to publicly admit and address it - that alone takes a lot of bravery - including your comment.

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                                                                                        It was actually someone in my social circle who suggested I read Jon Elder Robison’s book, Look Me in the Eye, which began my journey. She said I reminded her a lot of him. When I was in grade school, Aspergers wasn’t really a thing to the point of mass awareness. When it became a thing, I was already in high school. I surely would have benefited from some special education in my more formative years of grade school, but instead I had to learn it the hard way through social failure. This method wasn’t always successful, either.

                                                                                        Relationships of all sorts still baffle me, and I often question peoples’ choices when they make a beeline for the worse possible decision, when the best choice is obvious to me, but hey.

                                                                                        Human behaviour is so broad that I suspect people on the Aspergers side of the spectrum were just dismissed with people saying, “Oh, that’s just John being John.” In my family, the behaviour was probably more accepted because after my diagnosis, and learning what to look for, it’s clear that my dad is on the spectrum, also. So my behaviour was just probably explained by “the apple not falling far from the tree.”

                                                                                        Despite that, my mom definitely didn’t have the patience for a kid on the spectrum. It was bad.

                                                                                        But becoming self aware later in life, from where I sit, is a common thing. With age comes wisdom, hopefully.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          Thanks for taking the time to reply,

                                                                                          I was sent on a management course once which turned out to be a cleverly disguised self-improvement course but I think the thing that stayed with me more than anything was the instructor saying that “people are messy” - his exact phrase, repeated several times. I think part of what he meant was that there is no logic and no rules that govern everybody and every single relationship is unique and challenging in its own way.

                                                                                          That freed me from a lot of prejudice and stress I think. Although it may sound scary that you can’t rely on a set of instructions or a template for dealing with people, it’s also quite liberating and helped me avoid stereotyping people and treat them more individually rather than thinking there is some cultural, racial, religious (or any other) “norm” for anyone.

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            One thing I learned from working for this particular boss was, “What’s true for me isn’t necessarily true for you (or others). What struck me was a particular example he gave at a staff meeting, one day. This company had an inside sales force. It was phone stuff. They never left the office unless we went to trade shows, but he made them all wear ties because, “Wearing a tie makes you feel better, doesn’t it?” Well speaking for myself, it didn’t. Anything on or near my adam’s apple makes me gag, and wearing a tie all day was torture. The lesson learned was that HE didn’t see that what was true for him, wasn’t always true for everyone else. I applied that lesson to myself from that day forward. I think in management there are some universal truths about respect and behaviour that must apply to everyone, and then there’s all that individual relationship stuff you talked about.

                                                                                            I also know that being on the spectrum, and being awesome like we are, doesn’t always allow us to see these things so clearly in the moment. After all it’s literally a brain wiring thing.

                                                                                            For example. I see a person in this thread replying to everyone about how Linus doing what he is doing is BAD and this and that. I’m beginning to wonder if this person might not be on the spectrum, also, and might be unaware of what they’re putting out into the universe.

                                                                                            Thanks to everyone who’s having a reasonable and rational discussion about this.

                                                                                            BTW, I occasionally host panels at Sci Fi cons about Aspergers and Neuro-diversity with the title, “Sheldon, Asperger, and You,” and they have all been wildly successful. My hope is always to give someone else the gift of self awareness I got when my friend suggested Jon Elder Robison’s book to me.

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                                                                                      Hopefully they only hide www. when it is exactly at the start of the domain name, leaving duplicates and domains in the middle (like notriddle.www.github.io and www.www.lobste.rs) alone.

                                                                                      1. 43

                                                                                        How about just leaving the whole thing alone? URI/URLs are external identifiers. You don’t change someone’s name because it’s confusing. Such an arrogant move from google.

                                                                                        1. 11

                                                                                          Because we’re Google. We don’t have to care know better than you.

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            Eventually the URL bar will be so confusing and arbitrary users will just have to search google for everything.

                                                                                            1. 5

                                                                                              Which is of course, Google’s plan and intent, all along. Wouldn’t surprise me if they are aiming to remove URLs from the omni bar completely at some point.

                                                                                          2. 3

                                                                                            It’s the same with Safari on Mac - not only do they hide the subdomain but everything else from the URL root onwards too. Dreadful, and the single worst (/only really bad) thing about Safari’s UI.

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              You don’t change someone’s name because it’s confusing

                                                                                              That’s why they’re going to try to make it a standard.
                                                                                              They will probably also want to limit the ports that you can use with the www subdomain, or at least propose that some be hidden, like 8080

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                Perhaps everyone should now move to w3.* or web.* names just to push back! Serious suggestion.

                                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                                Indeed, but I still think it is completely unnecessary and I don’t get how this “simplifies” anything

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                                                                                                I can’t read that page. I see it as a purple background with a faint red texture on it. Does chrome on Android have a high contrast feature?

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                                                                                                  Ugh, with JavaScript disabled it’s even worse. The text isn’t even readable.

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                                                                                                    Luckily Firefox has Reader View (and similar for other browsers.)

                                                                                                    I’m not against making things look pretty, but no default way to read simply plain text is just unforgivable.

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                                                                                                      Thanks for the feedback, I’ll go through it with our web team to improve things in the future! It’s a shame for our authors if their content cannot be read.

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                                                                                                    There’s some sort of scroll monitoring script that turns the background white, do you have javascript enabled?

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                                                                                                      Thanks for replying! The second time I tried the site, it suddenly turned white and I could read it.

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                                                                                                    I’m impressed by the lack of testing for this “feature”. It may have a huge impact for end users, but they have managed it to ship with noob errors like the following:

                                                                                                    Why is www hidden twice if the domain is “www.www.2ld.tld”?

                                                                                                    Who in their right mind misses that, and how on Earth wasn’t it caught at some point before it made it to the stable branch?

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                                                                                                      url = url.replace(/www/g, '') - job well done!

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                                                                                                        Worse

                                                                                                        What’s really eye-opening is that comment just below wrapped in the pre-processor flag! Stunning.

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                                                                                                          Wow, so whoever controls www.com can disguise as any .com page ever? And, as long as it’s served with HTTPS, it’ll be “secure”? That’s amazing.

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                                                                                                              Not just .com. On any TLD so you could have lobster.www.rs

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                                                                                                              If I may ask, how is this worse than url = url.replace(/www/g, '')? If anything, the current implementation use a proper tokenizer to search and replace instead of a naive string replace.

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                                                                                                                That’s just my hyperbole.

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                                                                                                            Right, the amateurishness of Google here is stunning. You’d think with their famed interview process they’d do better than this.

                                                                                                            On a tangential rant, one astonishing phenomenon is the helplessness of tech companies with multibillion capitalizations on relatively simple things like weeding out obvious bots or fixing the ridiculousness of their recommendation engines. This suggests a major internal dysfunction.

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                                                                                                              To continue off on the tangent, it sounds like the classic problem with any institution when it reaches a certain size. No matter which type (public, private, government…), at some point the managerial overhead becomes too great and the product begins to suffer.

                                                                                                              Google used to have a great search engine. It might even still be great for the casual IT user, but the signal-to-noise ratio has tanked completely within the past ~2 years. Almost all of my searches are now made on DuckDuckGo and it’s becoming increasingly rare that I even try Google, and when I do it’s mostly an exercise in frustration and I spend the first 3-4 searches on quoting and changing words to get proper results.

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                                                                                                                Large institutions collapsing under their own managerial weight is more of a ‘feature’ in this case.

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                                                                                                                  What are a few examples of queries for which DDG produces better results than Google?

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                                                                                                                    I’m not able to rattle off any examples, sorry. I’ll try to keep it in mind and post an example or two, but don’t hold your breath :)

                                                                                                                    I’ve been using DDG as my primary search engine for 2-3-4 years now, and have tried to avoid Google more and more in that same time frame. This also means that all the benefits of Google having a full profile on me are missing from the equation, and I don’t doubt that explains a lot of the misery I experience in my Google searches. However, I treat DDG the same and they still manage to provide me with better search results than Google…

                                                                                                                    In general every search that includes one or more common words tend to be worse on Google. It seems to me that Google tries to “guess” the intent of the user way too much. I don’t want a “natural language” search engine, I want a search engine that searches for the words I type into the search field, no matter how much they seem like misspellings.

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                                                                                                              I think it’s worth linking to the whole course too.

                                                                                                              It’s a shame the slide show doesn’t respond to mouse clicks below the main text. The arrow keys work, but I spent a minute or so clicking like an idiot before the next slide showed up.

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                                                                                                                Yeah, the lecture notes on the GHC implementation seem a bit easier to digest than the slides.

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                                                                                                                Here’s my issue with this article. The author posits that most podcatchers will remove the ability to subscribe via a URL.

                                                                                                                This makes no sense to me at all. There are many cases where people might want to listen to podcasts not offered through GOOG or APPL.

                                                                                                                Every podcatcher I have access to still supports and explicitly provides options for this.

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                                                                                                                  Op here,

                                                                                                                  I’m saying “I won’t be surprised if these apps gradually and silently remove this feature”. Of course, I can’t know this, but this is what I’m afraid of. And I don’t think it’s that crazy to imagine.

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                                                                                                                    It’s a valid concern. I guess I feel like as long as there’s any kind of application ecosystem on a given device, there will always be a podcatcher that allows subscriptions via bog standard RSS URL.

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                                                                                                                    I subscribe to a lot of RSS feeds, including podcasts and there’s been a worrying trend over the last year or two where new podcasts don’t even provide a direct RSS/Atom feed.

                                                                                                                    You have to visit their site to download the mp3 manually like some kind of animal. Or worse still, they make some stupid javascript widget or expect you to use a 3rd party app, or they proudly say it’s on itunes - which doesn’t expose the RSS feed - I had to write a scraper to get the RSS feed from the itunes page myself.

                                                                                                                    Same with blogs too. So many blogs now don’t have a feed. You’re expected to go to the site to check for new content.

                                                                                                                    The slow demise of RSS/Atom is a really worrying situation fo me and very few people seem to care.

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                                                                                                                      That is disappointing, and surprising given that there are companies like Feedly and Flipboard among others whose sole business relies on consuming RSS-ish feeds.

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                                                                                                                      How was the author saying that? Sounded like they were saying the other way around, if a podcaster posts just over RSS on their site then users on just Apple won’t see it on Apple by default.

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                                                                                                                        I think you’re conflating two things.

                                                                                                                        There are two problems here:

                                                                                                                        1. Unless you take explicit steps, merely publishing an RSS URL will not get your podcast into iTunes/Google Play
                                                                                                                        2. The author is worried that podcatchers (which now all provide this feature, if perhaps in an undocumented way for some) will remove the capability of subscribing to podcast RSS feeds via URL.
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                                                                                                                          Oh you said podcatcher. I read that as podcaster because I never heard of it called a podcatcher but that makes sense now.

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                                                                                                                      What a delightful API.

                                                                                                                      No questions, but I’d really like to see a link to the source code along with the docs though.

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                                                                                                                        Sounds like the C version of English As She Is Spoke

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                                                                                                                          My wife teaches English and will really appreciate this. Thanks!

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                                                                                                                            This type of naive translation is really common. A personal favourite