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    would love to know what extensions he’s using in sublime for compile checking

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      I have no idea if they’ve been using it, but a possibility could be Facebook’s fbinfer or Findbugs. I have used neither, so I can’t testify, but from what I’ve seen, these seem to do their task quite all right.

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        nice, ya i’ll give them a go

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        Open another terminal window. Run make. For each error that pops out, fix it with the editor. Rerun make as required.

        It’s not unusual for me to have three terminals open each with my preferred text editor, another term open for making the project, and another term open for running and debugging. I’ve yet to find an IDE that won’t crash on me (for over 25 years I’ve yet to find an IDE that lasts longer than 5 minutes without crashing).

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          And with the Acme editor this process is even simpler, for every error that pops up in make (running in an acme window), you just right click on the file name and it will open or switch to the file with the cursor on the right line/column.

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            Actually I found recently that Vim can do this, if you do:

            make > errors.log
            lint > errors2.log  # another good example
            vim errors.log
            

            Then just do “gf” over the error messages, and it parses “foo.py:32” in the correct way and jumps there! Works surprisingly well.

            Unix!

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              That’s really cool, though the part I like about acme is that it does all this composition of programs in a way that allows even a computer illiterate to use it. I mean anybody can right click on some text.

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              Yes, my text editor can do that. I even played around with that feature for a bit. I still find it faster using separate terminal windows.

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                I tend to use acme windows as my terminal, so opening another acme window is sort of like running a separate terminal.

                Though I do want to explore the idea of the “Universal user interface”, acme is really nice, but it’s a shame that it manages it’s own windows, it would be interesting to have a version of acme that worked a bit more like Kakoune. The text editor could simply be a graphical shell that talks to a text editing server and to other programs and doesnt actually do anything, that way it could probably be lightning fast, super flexible and easier to prove correct.

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                  it’s a shame that it manages it’s own windows, it would be interesting to have a version of acme

                  I’m fantasticating about this from the other perspective: it would be nice to have a rio evolution that allow you to edit, click and run anything on your screen.

                  I imagine an editable text toolbar on top of my screen containing things like

                  F1|Mail F2<>Edit Ctrl+F3^Open …

                  Where F1 pipe selected text to a mail program, F2 open selected text in a super simple editor that (simpler than acme and sam), once saved replace the selection, Ctrl+F3 send the selected text to the plumber with the Open command…

                  I guess you get the point…

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                    it would be nice to have a rio evolution that allow you to edit, click and run anything on your screen.

                    I feel like rio could be a program that only manages windows and offers a tag window for every window (or only one on top) . The tag window itself could be running a version of acme that doesn’t do window management.

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                      Frankly, this is something I have just fantasticated for a while.

                      The idea is that you should have the ultimate IDE available from boot.

                      Give a try to Oberon-07 if you want an idea of what I mean: Oberon was actually an inspiration for Acme UI design.

                      But I’m still working at protocol/kernel level issues in my os, so this is not something I investigated seriously.

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                        Yeah I’m familiar with Oberon, though I’ve never actually experimented with it. I’m thinking that a modern acme could just be a graphical window with mouse chording, the text editing could be handled by another program, like the way xi-editor frontends work.

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                      Yes, my text editor can do that as well. I can highlight some text, hit the right key (it’s not F2 but some other key my fingers remember) to feed the selection through an arbitrary command and then …

                      And it’s not even a new text editor, but one I’ve been using for over twenty years.

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                This is my workflow as well, although I sometimes have the terminal running inside a text editor for ease of navigation.

                entr is a godsend in this regard, as it offers a language and tooling agnostic way to re-run tests/builds when files change.

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                  I do the same. Do consider using something like screen or tmux, however, for a substantially nicer workflow.

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                    The last time I used screen in my workflow was when I had to dial up via modem into the school network (through a terminal server). Once ISPs and being part of the Internet became a thing, my use of screen has dropped. Yes, I still create new terminal windows when logging into a remote server.

                    The only time I use screen these days is if I have to remote into a server and keep a programming running while not logged in. It’s useful, but not a common use case.

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                      The last time I used screen in my workflow was when I had to dial up via modem into the school network (through a terminal server). Once ISPs and being part of the Internet became a thing, my use of screen has dropped. Yes, I still create new terminal windows when logging into a remote server.

                      The only time I use screen these days is if I have to remote into a server and keep a programming running while not logged in. It’s useful, but not a common use case.