1. 6

      I think this is a misguided blaming of the language when the programmer is at fault. If you are catching an exception in JavaScript, verify the type of exception before continuing. This is just a straightforward necessity when you don’t have a language with static types.

      So there are two programmer errors in the example: the typo of ‘sedn’ and the absence of a branching for the ‘nouser’ exception.

      I get that it’s not fun and the overall point is that JavaScript should handhold the programmer a bit better, but hey, it’s JavaScript and we’re used to Stockholm syndrome.

      1. 4

        In Python and Ruby the popular linters will point this kind of code out for catching all exceptions. There’s got to be an equivalent in JS.

        1.  

          I think verifying the type of the exception is difficult in practice. It is not a uniform practice to use granular “subclasses” so the instanceof operator can’t really help with application-specific or library-specific errors. You end up with very ad-hoc set of codes or flag properties that are just in no way comprehensive, stable, or reliable. I think the best you can do is what bounce does which is detect the 6 known programmer errors, but now we’re basically accepting the fact that what javascript itself provides is just not sufficient to properly categorize.

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          The trick here is that the bar will disappear when you fill it up. My bar disappeared when I donated the remaining balance. If you’re still seeing your bar, it means you need to donate the remaining balance.

          1. 2

            Huh? I donated before the bar was put there, I still see it. What do you mean by “remaining balance”?

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              I think zg was going for humor, that if someone wants to donate all of the remaining amount to reach the goal, the fundraiser will end and the bar will be removed.

              1. 3

                what’s “humor”?

          1. 2

            The original bug report: https://openradar.appspot.com/radar?id=4987859723354112

            Codepoints that cause the crash: U+0C1C U+0C4D U+0C1E U+200C U+0C3E

            Here is a pastebin with the glyph: https://pastebin.com/9Tr8ytTr

            Warning: if you paste it into your address bar, it may crash Safari and cause it to crash again every time it shows up in your history after that. If you paste it into other apps, they may or may not crash (many iOS apps confirmed and iMessage, Terminal, and others on MacOS).

            This is fixed for iOS in the latest beta, which you can sign up for (free): https://beta.apple.com/sp/betaprogram/

            1. 2

              Opening that pastebin hard-crashed firefox on my mac.

              1. 1

                I’m running MacOS 10.12.5 and FireFox 58.0.2 and I was able to open the pastebin safely.

                Are you running High Sierra or a different FF version?

                1. 1

                  I’m running MacOS 10.13.3 and FF 59.0b7.

            1. 1

              At least Mac has the ‘Later’ button! In Ubuntu there is no way to force close a desktop notification. You just need to wait for it to go away. It’s infuriating.

              1. 1

                It’s better over in Xubuntu-land, with “Do not disturb” mode (and logging during dnd, or always if you prefer) https://simon.shimmerproject.org/2017/12/12/xfce4-notifyd-sees-a-new-point-release/

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                If Firefox starts showing me ads I’m 100% abandoning the browser, period.

                1. 17

                  If Firefox starts showing me ads in the New Tab page, I’m 85% clicking on that little “(?)” icon, clicking “New Tab Preferences”, and un-checking a box or two.

                  But, I hope that if you end up running a browser made by an advertising company, you will at least savor the irony.

                  1. 5

                    Well, I abandoned chrome a long time ago and will certainly never return, if that’s what you’re getting at :)

                    Advertising is a slippery slope. I don’t care to play cat and mouse with a company that thinks it’s OK.

                    The real irony is that I (and probably many others) would be happy to pay for a browser…

                    1. 5

                      I’d be happy to pay for a high-quality browser too. But the industry doesn’t seem to be headed that way.

                      I’m curious where you’ll go. Vivaldi, Opera, and Brave all use the Blink rendering engine from Chromium. All the little WebKit-based browsers are beholden to Apple. Only Firefox has any independence or control of its code base, as far as I can tell.

                    2. 1

                      If Firefox starts showing me ads in the New Tab page, I’m 100% clicking on them, to support Mozilla.

                      But my new tab page is about:blank, I probably won’t see them :(

                      1. 1

                        Eh, given that Firefox has forced adware on its users in the past, I wonder if Mozilla isn’t an ad company at this point, if one which makes somewhat different kinds of deal.

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                      The Register is utter crap. This story was already posted here days ago in less sensationalized form.

                      Cue the hate bandwagon. Firefox is next in line. Pile on everybody! MIcrosoft, Apple and Google are so passe!

                      1. 5

                        So, yes, the Register is a tabloid. Do you have a link to the other story? I can’t find it.

                        In any case, this isn’t a hate wagon. I strongly feel that most forms of advertising are detrimental to society and our mental health, and I distance myself from ads as much as possible.

                        1. 4

                          here is the other story.

                          In my opinion, the categorization of the recommendations that Pocket will provide in the new tab as “advertising” is questionable.

                          I’m a heavy Pocket user, and I use their Recommended Stories feature quite often to great effect. Their engine does in fact recommend stories I’m interested in.

                          This isn’t Mozilla heavy-handedly blasting dialog based blocker ads to their users, this is them taking advantage of a partnership they’re in to provide users with a useful source of new content that they see as a default background in their “New” tab.

                          And you can turn it off as a part of the regular preferences as detailed here

                          1. 5

                            In my opinion, the categorization of the recommendations that Pocket will provide in the new tab as “advertising” is questionable.

                            Today it’s not “advertising.” It will be. Straight from Mozilla’s blog:

                            we will soon experiment with showing an occasional sponsored story within the Pocket Recommendations section in New Tab Page

                          2. 2
                          3. 1

                            People getting upset about this before it’s a real fiasco is probably the best possible situation. You’d rather is languish and become a festering wound before people react. It would not be better for Mozilla, in fact it would be horrible.

                            1. 2

                              I disagree with the characterization of this as “advertising” - see my previous response for more color.

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                            Sorry, not the first. I built this over 7 years ago… http://binarymax.com/tRand.html http://binarymax.com/javascript/tClient.js

                            Not as much mathematical rigor as yours, so props to you for taking it more seriously than I :)

                            Someone else also made one a couple years ago…but I can’t seem to find it. EDIT: found it - https://github.com/ryanmcdermott/birdseed

                            1. 3

                              Arrrh I googled it first and couldn’t find any ;-) Thanks for pointing this to me.

                              1. 4

                                Thank you for the invite @emrox! Yes, and also added Perl during the lunch break :) Feel free to suggest other lists on GitHub: https://github.com/listcommunity/support

                                1. 2

                                  Thank you @binarymax @nickpsecurity. I’ve been reading Lobsters for a while but it’s nice to be able to contribute :)

                                  1. 1

                                    This is really nice. Thank you for putting this together. And welcome to Lobsters :)

                                    1. 1

                                      Welcome to Lobsters! Good idea trying to integrate and organize the lists. :)

                                      1. 2

                                        the author of list.community contacted me on Twitter to let you know he added the C++ section to the page

                                        https://list.community/fffaraz/awesome-cpp

                                        1. 1

                                          No Perl either!

                                          1. 3

                                            There’s Javascript and Golang, it’s okay!

                                              1. 2

                                                I stand corrected, thanks! I didn’t find it on the linked front page.

                                                1. 3
                                          1. 3

                                            I don’t eat lobster because boiling alive is so WTF I can’t even think about it.

                                            I’m glad this exists and is a thing, and I hope it gains wide adoption in industry and for those who cook lobster at home.

                                            1. 7

                                              I’m starting the course https://www.coursera.org/learn/financial-markets-global as per the recommendation comment here: https://lobste.rs/s/2rwddp/what_is_on_your_2018_reading_list#c_3houma

                                              And continuing my massive art photography project as noted last week.

                                              (of course, the above is contingent on how much free time I have outside of work).

                                              1. 4

                                                I’m starting the course

                                                Same here! Let’s see if I make it to the end of this Coursera course. That would be… the first one?

                                                1. 3

                                                  Want to team up and each make sure the other stays on track?

                                              1. 2

                                                This game is great. The computer destroyed me though (predictably since it will play perfectly every time through a brute force search). I imagine it would be much better to play against another (less than perfect) human.

                                                1. 3

                                                  I wrote a multiplayer version of Quinto about 6 years ago, with a couple of rewrites since. An online demo is available at http://quinto-demo.jeremyevans.net/ if you can find another person to play with. Source code is at https://github.com/jeremyevans/quinto if you want to run your own server.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    That’s amazing! Small world. I’d love to see your CoffeScript source code, but couldn’t find it in the repo - is it intentionally kept secret, or is that just an accident? Either way, great game choice, and awesome project!

                                                    1. 2

                                                      The code was originally written in CoffeeScript+Node. The server was rewritten in Go, and then later rewritten in Ruby. At some point, I stopped using CoffeeScript on the front end and just started editing the resulting Javascript file directly. All of the information is in the repository if you look in the history: https://github.com/jeremyevans/quinto/tree/7ad48e43f76c1a9a847d5a677a8f11c69c9fa5bc

                                                  2. 2

                                                    There’s potential for beating a computer that plays the highest scoring move each time. You can play to avoid setting up long parallel plays, and it may be worth saving 5s and 0s since those can extend words of length greater than 1.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    An interesting question. Linguistically mapping of word classes (Part-of-Speech) to grammatical rules can be considered a type system of sorts. As per programming languages, we could look to theory as early as COBOL (possibly earlier?), as one of its primary goal was to mimic natural language:

                                                    The desire for readability led to the use of English-like syntax and structural elements, such as nouns, verbs, clauses, sentences, sections, and divisions. [0]

                                                    I am not sure those could count as types though, as it reflects syntax.

                                                    [0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COBOL#Verbose_syntax

                                                    –EDIT– Actually, ignore almost everything I said. The more I think about it, this isn’t what you seem to be looking for. Word Classes indeed are syntax oriented and have no inner type per high level rules. There are emergent behavioral rules for types of things like measurements and labels when referring to nouns, but as far as I know those type classifications have not been mapped to any natural programming language.

                                                    1. 16

                                                      Finally, yes, everyone knows LinkedIn is very frustrating in a lot of ways. Unfortunately, network effects have made them the de facto official professional networking tool of much of the world

                                                      Actually, I’ve quit all other mainstream social media except LinkedIn, and find it a pleasure to use. It’s like the sugar coated optimistic version of the world. There are very very few flamewars or socio-political rants, and people are in general more civil, professional, and upbeat.

                                                      Looking forward to meeting fellow crustaceans in this rose-colored virtual utopia.

                                                      1. 7

                                                        and find it a pleasure to use.

                                                        Interesting, I’ve experienced quite the opposite. Their UI was horrible and they required you to login to view messages you got from other users. Maybe my memory is off but I think they also advertised their premium features wherever they could. I am unsure what makes LinkedIn a pleasure to use or better than staying in touch with other professionals by email or some other form of communication.

                                                        UPDATE: I may confused them with Xing, which is the german LinkedIn equivalent. Nonetheless, I don’t like both services.

                                                        1. 15

                                                          LinkedIn is also relentless with email marketing: I had to add a rule to block their marketing emails after two attempts to remove myself from their lists (I shouldn’t have been on their list to begin with, as I didn’t sign up). They are one of the worst offenders in this domain, it has to be said.

                                                          In my short experience in tech, I haven’t had to use LinkedIn and haven’t been pressured to use it. That may be specific to the tech industry, but I am thankful for it.

                                                        2. 3

                                                          There are very very few flamewars or socio-political rants, and people are in general more civil, professional, and upbeat.

                                                          I find that barley surprising, considering what kind of a social network it is.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            It’s like the sugar coated optimistic version of the world.

                                                            That’s what makes it a bit painful for me. Still, it’s good that there’s at least some corners in the world that are like that.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            I saw one of these yesterday and in response to your ‘ask’, I investigated.

                                                            https://github.com/minsle follows 19.8k accounts but otherwise doesn’t appear to be active. When this user followed me yesterday, I blocked them. Why? Because I didn’t know/care what they are doing, but clearly they were in it for the data. No thanks.

                                                            BUT… I’ve unblocked them now! Because my investigation turned up this: https://github.com/github-serendipity/github-serendipity.github.io/blob/master/README-en.md

                                                            The project shows some promise, though it’s definitely not ready to go live.

                                                            The user apparently made this repo public yesterday sometime after I blocked them. Let that be lessons.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              They followed me too! Maybe we should be flattered as per their profile “I only follow excellent people”

                                                            1. 3

                                                              I think the answer is simple, and most people in this thread don’t want to admit it or are too idealistic: People create GitHub accounts en masse, and use these to artificially boost their own (or someone elses) repositories reputation. After all, who hasn’t had to decide between two similar GitHub projects, and chose one based on the amount of stars or forks they had?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                That’s it. I hadn’t thought of that but it makes perfect sense.

                                                                I also think I chose a bad example here, because this person could definitely just be saving a whole bunch of repos for later.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  1.3k repositories for later? Maybe, why not, but the person certainly would seem to have quite a lot planned

                                                                  I just took a look your example again, and the only profile they are following is one by “Brainlabs Digital”: https://github.com/BrainlabsDigital - they seem to be some data analysis organisation, so either the profile you posted is just an account they use gather data from GitHub or “Brainlabs” is just an elaborate scheme to make people believe just that, and prevent them from thinking that it’s just a reputation-bot. Both cases are equally likely, if you ask me.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Well, at some point maybe they were meant for ‘later’ and then moved on to other things :) I mean, I’m only a mild github addict, and I have >500 repos starred (of which probably 90% I thought there was a chance I might use it at some point).

                                                                    The odd thing that strikes me is there is so much forkage going on but not a single contribution.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      I use stars extremely loosely. If I find a repository even remotely interesting, even if it’s e.g. in a language I don’t use, I star it; consequently I have 1.4k stars.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I’m half-way through building a top-down photography structure for capturing lots (multiple hundreds) of loose-leaf artwork that doesn’t fit on an easel and so can’t be shot with a tripod (the paper would just fall off).

                                                                  Since there is so much art that I need to photo, I need to have a good workflow in place to capture and catalog. I’ll use gphoto2 to preview/capture pages and try to get each shot down to 15 seconds (preview, capture, flip page, repeat).

                                                                  As for the physical setup, I have an old SLR digital camera that will point straight down from about 6 feet high.
                                                                  I have a good lighting kit that I got really cheap, and some discount white bedsheets to use as a giant makeshift lightbox.

                                                                  This weekend I traced out the lens and handle shapes from MDF and sawed/filed it out, getting it to fit nicely, and cut the rest of the supporting structure using the remaining MDF and some leftover 2x4s. The structure will hang from the joists in the basement, with a long cable connecting the camera to a laptop. I hope to have everything going and taking photos by the end of this week.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    So far, only two:

                                                                    1. “The Intelligent Investor” - Benjamin Graham (revised edition)
                                                                    2. “Social Engineering: The Art of Human Hacking” - Christopher Hadnagy
                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      I have The Intelligent Investor on my bookshelf right now. Its been giving me the evil eye for a year now. Thanks for the reminder! ;)

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        The Intelligent Investor”

                                                                        Great book. If you like I recommend that you check “A Wealth of Common Sense: Why Simplicity Trumps Complexity in Any Investment Plan” and the great Financial markets coursera course.

                                                                        1. 5

                                                                          Thanks for the coursera suggestion! Is this the specific course you are referring to? https://www.coursera.org/learn/financial-markets-global

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            Exactly. Shiller, the teacher, is a nobel laureate. The course is really good. It can get a little bit dense specially in the first weeks, but do it completely, it gets better with each week.

                                                                    1. 7

                                                                      The Big Co’s of the world are rife with this problem. Even worse, in the meetings I attend I know who these people are, but there is little I can do about it. I was really hoping the countermeasures section was written as part of this post, because I’d really like some idea here, other than just bluntly calling out the saboteurs.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        The trick is to establish consensus on what is to be done before the meeting, and make sure the chair is on board.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Well, having an agenda and goals are important for every meeting…but when a saboteur derails a group, even for a moment, getting back on track to complete the stated purpose within the timebox is not easy.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Not with a capable chair.

                                                                        2. 3

                                                                          It’s probably something well beyond the Big Co’s of the world. My wife recognized these as a teacher in a small department in a mid-sized school. I recognize these tactics from a variety of different jobs in manual labour.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Sometimes making the same “reasonable” suggestions, or amplifying them, puts them in a spot where they can’t go forward and so, to maintain momentum, have to go back.

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            I decided to spend a year away from Twitter. I hope this will nudge me into more side projects and experiments with solo web publishing

                                                                            1. 4

                                                                              I found quitting twitter was pretty easy once I uninstalled the app from my phone. Desktop wise I still click on the occasional link but I no longer consume timelines, and haven’t posted in over a year.

                                                                              Good luck!