1. 7

    long time K-9 user, I switched to FairEmail early this year. K-9 started having problems not showing notifications for new mail last year, I put up with it for months because the issue was active on their tracker. after long enough I just had to switch so I could know when I receive mail. FairEmail has been pleasant so I don’t see myself going back even if this means they’ve fixed that problem, it has about the same feature set but the notifications work.

    1. 14

      I just tried FairEmail and I put this in the category of begware. It is being advertised as free and open source but as soon as you set it up and view your inbox, there is a notice pinned to the top asking you to support the author by buying the pro version. You can hide this, but only for two weeks.

      I don’t have a problem with someone developing free/open source apps and asking for a donation, or even releasing a free version and a pro version with more features. I don’t begrudge the author wanting to make a living either. But be up-front and honest about your intentions with the user. Having a persistent nag notification that you only find out about after going through the non-trivial work of setting up your email accounts really rubs me the wrong way.

      1.  

        i had forgotten about the nag since i read most of my mail straight from the notification. that’s a very fair criticism and is something i don’t condone myself. i think i’ll switch back to K-9 now that a new stable is on the horizon.

      2. 4

        I’ve tried FairEmail for a while and uh.. it feels so cluttered and unintuitive. Threading just doesn’t work right. The screen with many mails from a thread together is very frustrating to navigate.

        1. 2

          i rarely have threaded email chains in my personal account so i had kinda glanced over this.. but looking at one, yeah, that’s clunky. i mostly just read mail so i haven’t experienced the UX for things like sorting/tagging, composing, etc.

          1. 1

            To be fair, K-9 doesn’t get threading right either (if you’re a participant, your sent emails aren’t together with your received emails). This is with version 5.600.

            I still use it though.

            1.  

              Add a feature request! Currently k9-mail always puts a copy of sent mail in the Sent folder, but it could put replies in the same folder as the mail being replied to.

        1. 5

          A correction, the article says, “Pop doesn’t use the Ubuntu repositories. Instead they use their own” which isn’t true. Take a look at /etc/apt/sources.list. It’s all the standard Ubuntu repos plus a “proprietary” repo in which they ship non-open-source like VSCode, Chrome, etc. For their open source stuff, /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ points to a PPA on Launchpad.

          They do have an Ubuntu mirror on apt.pop-os.org but there’s probably no real reason to use it.

          Once I get a spare moment, I’m probably going to move both my personal and work laptops to Pop OS soon. I used Xubuntu for the longest time (and before that, various distros with MATE) but found with Ubuntu 19.10 that GNOME 3 can be mostly usable for me with a whole bunch of tweaks and extensions. But I’m looking to get away from Ubuntu due to their increasing use of snaps, which are highly incompatible with how I want to manage my machines.

          1. 2

            But I’m looking to get away from Ubuntu due to their increasing use of snaps, which are highly incompatible with how I want to manage my machines.

            Me, too, but isn’t PopOS using Flatpak?

          1. 2

            Can somebody share some thoughts on the Pop UI(experience) vs Gnome/KDE? Would be interesting to hear.

            For example I like having an instant global CMD and search or some kind of taskbar system.

            1. 4

              The Pop OS UI is GNOME 3 with lightly modified defaults and a few extensions.

              1. 1

                Is it possible to use XFCE, or does this lose the polish PopOS devs did?

            1. 30

              Not entirely on topic, but related: your website has a banner which says

              By continuing to browse the site, you are agreeing to the use of cookies.

              The EU data protection body recently stated that scrolling does not equal consent, see for instance https://techcrunch.com/2020/05/06/no-cookie-consent-walls-and-no-scrolling-isnt-consent-says-eu-data-protection-body/

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                Then again, he is the type who “cares about SEO”.

                1. 3

                  Wait, what’s wrong with caring about SEO?

                  1. 5

                    There was a time were SEO was synonymous with tricking the search engines into featuring your site. The running theme was SEO was a set of dark patterns and practices to boost your ranking without investing in better content.

                    For many people SEO still has similar connotations.

                    1. 16

                      There was a time …

                      Did that change?

                      1. 0

                        Did that change?

                        Based on my recent efforts at looking into these things from a developer point of view, I would say yes it’s changing.

                      2. 6

                        AFAIK, there’s still considered to be “White hat” and “Black hat” SEO. White hat SEO involves stuff like organizing links and URLs well, including keywords appropriate to what you actually do, writing quality content, and per this article, encouraging links to your domain and paying attention to whether they use nofollow. Generally, stuff that doesn’t go against the spirit of what the search engine is trying to do, tries to get more legitimate users who genuinely want your product to find it and learn about it more easily etc.

                        Black hat SEO involves stuff like spinning up link farms, spamming links across social media and paying for upvotes, adding a bazillion keywords for everything under the sun unrelated to what you’re doing, etc. Generally trying to trick search engines and visitors into doing things against their purposes.

                        It may feel a little dirty at times, but it’s probably tough to get a business going in a crowded market without paying attention to white hat SEO.

                        1. 2

                          It may feel a little dirty at times, but it’s probably tough to get a business going in a crowded market without paying attention to white hat SEO.

                          This is common issue for healthcare sites. If you have bona fide information that’s reviewed and maintained by experts it competes with sites selling counterfeits, outdated information, conspiracy theories, etc. These sites try every trick they can to scam people. If you don’t invest in SEO you are wasting people’s time with bad information in most cases, but some people can be harmed. In the US this can boil down to a freedom of speech discussion, but if you work internationally you have clearer legal obligations to act.

                          Search engines do want to help directly in some cases, but there is still an expectation that the good guys are following what would be considered white hat SEO practices. White hat SEO often has other benefits with accessibility, so I think it’s worth listening.

                          1. 3

                            Yep, this is a bit unfortunately true. IIRC, StackOverflow had to implement SEO practices as, without it, other sites that scraped their content and rehosted it were actually getting higher rankings in Google than SO themselves.

                        2. 3

                          Makes sense. I wish more people (developers in particular) would start questioning these connotations. The present-day advice on how to do SEO right is a lot different from what it used to be.

                          1. 8

                            As the parent said, SEO originally meant “hacking” google search rankings but over time, Google eliminated these hacks one by one, saying the whole time that their goal was to deliver search results that were relevant and useful. However, the way they define “relevant and useful” is primarily:

                            1. How closely the page content matches the serarch query
                            2. How many “reputable sources” link to the page
                            3. How long visitors stay on the page (usually directly related to length)
                            4. How many people click on the link

                            So SEO became less about technical trickery and is now more about human trickery. This resulted in the rise of what I call “blogspam”, i.e. blogs that crank out content with affiliate links and ads peppered throughout. This might not be a bad thing per se, except that most of the time I land on blogspam, I am inundated by pop-up dialogs, cookie warnings, ads and miles of empty content designed to make you Just Keep Scrolling or hook you with an auto-play video. Because both of these things keep you on the page longer, which increases their search rankings.

                            This isn’t always quite so bad for tech-related queries, where StackOverflow and its ilk have cornered nearly every result, but try searching for something generic like “hollandaise sauce recipe” or “how to get rid of aphids” or “brakes on a Prius” and you will drown in an unending sea of blogspam.

                            This has been another episode of “What Grinds bityard’s Gears”

                            1. 1
                              1. How closely the page content matches the serarch query

                              Since you put “relevant and useful” in quotes, I’m assuming you feel that a search query matching the page content is not a good signal of whether a search result is good. I’m curious why you think that?

                              Just Keep Scrolling or hook you with an auto-play video. Because both of these things keep you on the page longer, which increases their search rankings.

                              That’s actually not true. Google made a blog post a while ago mentioning that pop-up dialogs (or anything that reduces content accessibility) reduces search rankings.

                              In any case, while I do agree that not all SEO advice is (or has historically been) good, the blanket statement that all SEO advice is bad is also not correct (or fair). Besides, the black-hat SEO advice is slowly becoming more and more pointless as Google gets smarter at figuring things out.

                              1. 1

                                This isn’t always quite so bad for tech-related queries, where StackOverflow and its ilk have cornered nearly every result, but try searching for something generic like “hollandaise sauce recipe” or “how to get rid of aphids” or “brakes on a Prius” and you will drown in an unending sea of blogspam.

                                I feel the pain, but is this less about SEO and more about how certain people have developed business opportunities? SO has largely replaced expertsexchange in search results, but in a way this was one of the founder’s aims that has been mentioned in various places.

                                The StackExchange network of sites has been trying to expand to cover, your example of “how to get rid of aphids”, but it hasn’t yet been successful. There is inertia with getting these sites off the ground and employing people to write quality questions and answers, but this doesn’t align with the community ethos. Arguably, it would be better for the web since you’d get a better experience when you click through search results. I wish there was an easier answer.

                                I don’t see why there couldn’t be a recipe site with the quality user experience you associate with SO. There are however a lot of entrenched interests and competition. People also have a tendency of sharing copyrighted recipes they’ve copied down from friends or family. Incumbents won’t react like expertsexchange to SO.

                          2. 3

                            SEO is like ads on the internet; in theory it’s a good thing, helps people to find relevant content, helps companies to make more profits. But in reality, it’s just a pissing contest who exploits the user most. If a company made some money by using some shady SEO tricks, then we’ll do it 2x more intensively, so we’ll earn some money too. Who cares that the search engine results will be less accurate?

                            1. 1

                              To be honest, try looking up the modern SEO recommendations (black hat SEO is becoming more and more pointless as Google gets smarter at figuring things out). You’ll be pleasantly surprised.

                        3. 6

                          The funny part is that the only cookie used on this site (that I can see) is the cookie that stores the fact that the user accepted the use of cookies :D

                          Also, the law never forced the display of the “cookie wall” for purely-technical cookies (eg: login and such), but only those aimed at tracking.

                        1. 4

                          Being a radio person, when I first read this, I was honestly a little bit surprised that it worked at all.

                          If you know the frequencies involved (almost certainly 2.4 GHz here, since it’s a very old article), you can calculate the loss for a given type of coax. In this case, a 2.4 GHz signal in RG-6 loses 98% of its power over a 100-foot run. Most houses are smaller than that, so a more reasonable run of 25 feet turns out to be a loss of only 4 dB or 63%. Very acceptable given the rather insane sensitivity of wifi radios. Even 5.7 GHz would only present a loss of 7.4 dB over 25 feet. I’m not sure how or whether any of this work work with the fancy beam-forming and MIMO stuff that’s out now, however.

                          There is also the matter of a potential impedance mismatch. I don’t know for sure what impedance wifi radios operate on, but I assume it’s 50 ohms. RG-6 is 75 ohms so there will be some loss at both ends of the cable.

                          1. 1

                            MIMO will fail to find multiple spatial channels, unless of course you do multiple coax runs. But if you wired one antenna port up to the coax and left antennas on the rest, it would probably manage to use both :)

                          1. 3

                            Jesus Christ this article is complete trash.

                            Two thirds of the article is pointless propaganda, only after a good 60% the author actually starts explaining how this zettelkasten system works.

                            What’s the point? Why are you even trying to convince me? Are trying to sell me a piece of furniture later?


                            Regarding the system itself: I am tempted to say that a good wiki software like confluence would do the same, but the real advantage of the furniture is that it’s likely going to keep working in 20 years. I wouldn’t bet the same in confluence (or MediaWiki or whatever).

                            1. 4

                              Mediawiki is 18 years old. Confluence is 16. Considering the Lindy effect, there is a good chance they will still work in 20 years.

                              1. 4

                                Well, I wouldn’t call Confluence “good wiki software” any more than I would call Visual Basic a robust development environment, but I take your point. My database of personal and professional notes for the past 15 years has been a private instance of Dokuwiki and the more I read about Zettelkasten, it just sounds like a curated personal wiki like I have, once you get past all the gushing.

                                1. 2

                                  Editing in confluence is light years ahead of pretty much everything else.

                                  1. 1

                                    Does dokuwiki have backlinks and tags?

                                    1. 2

                                      Backlinks yes, tags no. Maybe with a plug-in.

                                      1. 1

                                        Thanks.

                                        So perhaps one could have a page called “Tag:Something” that only holds a description of what could have been the tag “#Something”. All pages that are related to “Something” should have a link to “Tag:Something” on their taglist, and the backlinks on page “Tag:Something” will show relevant pages.

                                        It’s a bit like Wikepedia’s “Category:Something”, isn’t it.

                                  2. 3

                                    The space around the concept “Zettelkasten” has all the features of an emerging marketing space. There are already multiple software solutions. Just wait for the custom-made physical slip-boxes, the note cards in different colors, the books, the pay-for videos, and the webinars.

                                    1. 7

                                      As I wrote here a couple weeks ago:

                                      The Zettelkasten thing sure has been hitting the zeitgeist hard these last few months - right around when I started poking at those ideas myself after kind of edging around them for a decade or two. It’s interesting to feel a burgeoning nerd methodology cult wash over and through the system of my own thinking. I was a lot less self-aware the last few times this really happened to me (the first big wiki wave back in the era of thousand-line Perl CGI wiki software comes to mind), and I never got drawn into GTD or Agile on any deeply felt personal level, so it’s almost like a new experience.

                                      That said, I think it’s also been quietly bubbling along in the background of the note-taking nerd memespace for many years now. I think I first ran across the word “Zettelkasten” on Taking Note, a blog I’ve probably been following since 2008 or so, but index card approaches that are clear relatives to it in one way or another have been popping up now and then for most of my adult life, I think. It just seems to have reached a critical mass lately. Or, as you say, become an emerging marketing space. Establishing itself as a working methodology-cult ecosystem with an in-group vocabulary, defined rituals, canonical texts & standard arguments, and mystique about True Process. You can see it happening in realtime over at the Zettelkasten Forum, which is run by the authors of The Archive.

                                      …and which is an interesting forum to skim now and then. I don’t want to be disparaging, this is just how these sorts of cultural phenomena seem to unfold. I’m trying to stay self-aware about all this while I spend a fair amount of time building up my own system of notes.

                                      (I did some ranting about notes about notes / writing about writing and so forth last night, inspired partly by this thread and others like it.)

                                      1. 3

                                        The memory of your comment inspired mine.

                                        There will always be a market for selling tools that magically replace hard work and time with a “process”. I’m not really judging. My work/life doesn’t require anything like Zettelkasten, but I’m sure it would interest my dad, who has been buying old handheld computers just to keep using their database software.

                                    2. 4

                                      It’s weird too, that it sells the idea, then starts explaining how it works, then it goes back to selling it again for a few more paragraphs! And only after that second set of propaganda it finishes the explanation.

                                      1. 3

                                        It’s not well written, but all the tools linked in the article are free (and most of them not harvesting your data).

                                        1. 2

                                          What’s the point? Why are you even trying to convince me?

                                          I think that it is targeted towards a particular audience: “The main component of The Writing Cooperative is our publication, which is one of Medium’s largest. […] Everything we publish falls within our mission statement: Helping each other write better.” But yeah, the tempo was a bit choppy and it reminded me of one of those “weird thing” articles. Then with big promises it dumps a board game on the reader without explaining the rules.

                                          It seems like there is something promising in Luhmann’s system, but I don’t want to risk getting a hand-me-down cargo culted version of it.

                                        1. 2

                                          I don’t know if I can get behind a self-hosting article that has been posted to medium.

                                          1. 1

                                            Fair. This was my first article, had to post somewhere ;) Personal site incoming.

                                          1. 29

                                            TL;DR: Organize notes with tags and links instead of folders. Notes should be small & digestible “ideas” instead of lengthy analysis so they can be better linked.

                                            1. 19

                                              I would say there is a more important, not explicitly mentioned overall concept here. You train yourself to, rather than gradually forgetting about the past, keep revisiting your accumulated knowledge, everytime from a different angle, because you actively try to fit in new ideas into an existing body of previous ideas. You award yourself for doing so (by neatly tugging away a card in a drawer), creating an incentive to keep doing it.

                                              This way you’ll be much more inclined to regularly overthink what you know and keep previous ideas in a semi-active working state. I suspect that the Zettelkasten maps very well to a mode of functioning that the brain is surprisingly good at (and thus feels good and thus readily induces a state of flow): maintaining relatively quick access to a lot of information by linking ideas together in the form of a web.

                                              1. 5

                                                That’s a good summary.

                                                I’d also emphasize the organically evolving heterarchy (which the Zettelkasten facilitates) as opposed to a pre-defined hierarchy (that is the norm for outliners like Workflow, Dynalist, etc.).

                                                1. 1

                                                  For anybody coming to this thread late, we are developing an official community zettelkasten here: https://www.zettel.page/

                                                2. 1

                                                  So basically what I’ve been doing for the past 15 years with a private wiki. Didn’t know it had a name!

                                                  (Although in my case, due to other issues, my extensive notes and organization only bring me up to functionally productive.)

                                                1. 2

                                                  I posted a comment here not too long ago bemoaning the lack of a reasonable tech-centric search engine.

                                                  Thank you. I will use this every day.

                                                  1. 9

                                                    I was really interested in IPFS a few years ago, but ultimately was disappointed that there seemed to be no passive way to host content. I’d like to have had the option to say along the lines o “I’m going to donate 5GB for hosting IPFS data, and the software will take care of the rest”.

                                                    My understanding was that, one has to explicitly mark some file as something you’d like to serve too, and only then will be really be permanent. Unless it got integrated into a browser-like boomark system, I have the feeling that most content will be lost because. Can anyone who has been following their developments tell me if they have improved on this situation?

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I thought they were planning to use a cryptocurrency (“Filecoin”) to incentivize hosting. I’m not really sure how that works though. I guess you “mine” Filecoins by hosting other people’s files, and then spend Filecoins to get other people to host your files.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        This is a hard problem to solve, because you want to prevent people from flooding all hosters; so there has to be either some kind of PoW or money involved. And with money involved, there’s now an incentive for hosters to misbehave, so you have to deal with them, and this is hard; there are some failed projects that tried to address it.

                                                        IPFS’ authors’ solution to this is Filecoin which, afaik, they had in mind since the beginning of IPFS, but it’s not complete yet.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          My understanding was that, one has to explicitly mark some file as something you’d like to serve too,

                                                          Sort of… my recollection is that when you run an IPFS node (which is just another peer on the network), you can host content on IPFS via your node, or you can pull content from the network through your node. If you publish content to your node, the content will always be available as long as your node is online. If another node on the network fetches your content, it will only be cached on the other node for some arbitrary length of time. So the only way to host something permanently on IPFS is to either run a node yourself or arrange for someone else’s node to keep your content in their cache (probably by paying them). It’s a novel protocol with interesting technology but from a practical standpoint, doesn’t seem to have much benefit over the traditional Internet in terms of content publishing and distribution, except for the fact that everything can be massively (and securely) cached.

                                                          There are networks where you hand over a certain amount of disk space to the network and are then supposedly able to store your content (distributed, replicated) on other nodes around the Internet. But IPFS isn’t one of those.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            There are networks where you hand over a certain amount of disk space to the network and are then supposedly able to store your content (distributed, replicated) on other nodes around the Internet.

                                                            What are some of them? Is Storj one of those?

                                                            1. 3

                                                              Freenet is one. You set aside an amount of disk space and encrypted chunks of files will be stored on your node. Another difference from IPFS is that when you add content to Freenet it pushes it out to other nodes immediately, so you can turn your node off and the content remains in the network through the other nodes.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                VP Eng of Storj here! Yes, Storj is (kinda) one of them, with money as an intermediary. Without getting into details, if you give data to Storj, as long as you have enough STORJ token escrowed (or a credit card on file), you and your computers could walk away and the network will keep your data alive. You can earn STORJ tokens by sharing your hard drive space.

                                                                The user experience actually mimics AWS much more than you’d guess for a decentralized cryptocurrency storage product. Feel free to email me (jt@storj.io) if some lobste.rs community members want some free storage to try it out: https://tardigrade.io/satellites/

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Friend, I’ve been following your work for ages and have had no real incentive to try it. As a distributed systems nerd, I love what you’ve come up with. The thing which worries me is this bit:

                                                                  decentralized cryptocurrency storage product.

                                                                  I’m actually really worried about the cryptocurrency part of this, since it imbues an otherwise-interesting product with a high degree of sketchiness. Considering that cryptocurrency puts you in the same boat as Bitcoin (and the now-defunct art project Ponzicoin), why should I rethink things? Eager to learn more facts in this case. Thanks for taking the time to comment in the first place!

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Hi!

                                                                    I guess there’s a couple of things you might be saying here, and I’m not sure which, so I’ll respond to all of them!

                                                                    On the technical side:

                                                                    One thing that separates Storj (v3) from Sia, Maidsafe, Filecoin, etc, is that there really is no blockchain element whatsoever in the actual storage platform itself. The whitepaper I linked above is much more akin to a straight distributed systems pedigree sans blockchain than you’d imagine. Cryptocurrency is not used in the object storage hotpath at all (which I continue to maintain would be latency madness) - it’s only used for the economic system of background settlement. The architecture of the storage platform itself would continue to work fine (albeit less conveniently) if we swapped cryptocurrency for live goats.

                                                                    That said, it’s hard to subdivide goats in a way that retain many of the valuable properties of live goats. I think live goats make for a good example of why we went with cryptocurrency for the economic side of storage node operation - it’s really much more convenient to automate.

                                                                    As a user, though, our primary “Satellite” nodes will absolutely just take credit cards. If you look up “Tardigrade Cloud Storage”, you will be able to sign up and use the platform without learning one thing about cryptocurrency. In fact, that’s the very reason for the dual brands (tardigrade.io vs storj.io)

                                                                    On the adoption side:

                                                                    At a past cloud storage company I worked at before AWS existed, we spent a long time trying to convince companies it was okay to back up their most sensitive data offsite. It was a challenge! Now everyone takes it for granted. I think we are in a similar position at Storj, except now the challenge is decentralization and cryptocurrency.

                                                                    On the legal/compliance side:

                                                                    Yeah, cryptocurrency definitely has the feeling of a wild west saloon in both some good ways and bad. To that end, Storj has spent a significant investment in corporate governance. There’s definitely a lot of bad or shady actors in the ecosystem, and it’s painfully obvious that by choosing cryptocurrency we exist within that ecosystem and are often judged by the actions of neighbors. We’re not only doing everything we can to follow existing regulations with cryptocurrency tokens, we’re doing our best to follow the laws we think the puck could move towards, and follow those non-existent laws as well. Not that it makes a difference to you if you’re averse to the ecosystem in general, but Storj has been cited as an example of how to deal with cryptocurrency compliance the right way. There’s definitely a lot of uncertainty in the ecosystem, but our legal and compliance team are some of the best in the business, and we’re making sure to not only walk on the right side of the line, but stay far away from lines entirely.

                                                                    Without going into details I admit that’s a bit vague.

                                                                    Anyway, given the length of my response you can tell your point is something I think a lot about too. I think the cryptocurrency ecosystem desperately needs a complete shaking out of unscrupulous folks, and it seems like that’s about as unlikely to happen as a complete shaking out of unscrupulous folks from tons of other money-adjacent industries, but perhaps the bar doesn’t have to be raised very far to make things better.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      The lack of a blockchain is a selling point. Thanks for taking the time to respond. I’ll check out the whitepaper ASAP!

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        if we swapped cryptocurrency for live goats.

                                                                        … I kinda want to live in this world

                                                              2. 1

                                                                You might want to check out Arweave.org.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I have the feeling that most content will be lost

                                                                  Only if the person hosting it turns off their server? IPFS isn’t a storage system, like freenet, but a protocol that allows you to fetch data from anywhere it is stored on the network (for CDN, bandwidth, and harder-to-block). The person making the content available is still expected to bother storing/serving it somewhere themselves, just like with the normal web.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    If you want to donate some disk space you can start following some of the clusters here: https://collab.ipfscluster.io .

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I don’t think I’ve seen this, which is bizarre, but I would recommend appending a “(2003)” to the headline.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      I would, but the edit window has closed.

                                                                      If you read or skimmed it, what do you think of the contents? The document speaks to me because it appears to assume a reader who knows from exposure what the concepts are, but not what they really are or how the kernel thinks of them.

                                                                      But my naive starting point affords only limited judgement; so I am curious whether a more experienced person would also think this document’s contents are useful for people new to the kernel.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        I would say it’s a quick skim through the major features and functionality of the Linux kernel as it existed in 2003. Probably meant as a quick introduction for someone tasked with writing systems or code around Linux but had barely heard of it up until then. It seems to assume the reader is already somewhat familiar with contemporary operating system design, possibly some Unix. Based on the age, I don’t think I would rely on it today as a serious reference, but I will give it credit for its conciseness.

                                                                    1. 6

                                                                      This is besides the point, but when the author describes discovering and settling on VSCode, then:

                                                                      I continued using VSCode throughout my college life and during internships.

                                                                      How times flies…

                                                                      (The initial (non-preview) release of VSCode was November 2015)

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        I had a hard time making sense of the author’s timeline… He talks about learning C++ in an MS-DOS IDE, but then used VSCode (which is only 5 years old) throughout his college years… So either he went to college much later in life than most people or his first computer was technically obsolete for two decades before he owned it.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          In third-world countries, Borland’s IDEs were popular in education for long past their sell dates. I know it’s the case for Russia, at least.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        For more than I decade, I have been recording personal and tech-related notes on a private instance of DokuWiki. I envy people who can just dump all of their notes into a dir on disk and/or sync them around but in my career, I have almost always had separate work and personal computers, and sometimes need to access my notes from a location where HTTPS is the only thing allowed through the firewall. The stats are:

                                                                        • 1342 pages
                                                                        • 8.1 MB of text (not including old revisions of pages)

                                                                        I love Dokuwiki I’m in the process of writing my own wiki because I haven’t found one that ticks all these boxes at the same time:

                                                                        • lightweight
                                                                        • keeps articles in plaintext files
                                                                        • written in Python, the language I usually reach for
                                                                        • Markdown
                                                                        • an editing textarea that fills up the whole browser window and doesn’t force me to deal with two scrollbars
                                                                        • optionally namespaced page names (e.g. ’python/syntax/variables`)

                                                                        And as a nice bonus, I figured out how to get syntax highlighting in the text editor, so that’s fun. I’m not a programmer by trade so the code is very rough. I doubt I will release it publicly.

                                                                        1. 5

                                                                          Do any lobsters have ham radio licences?

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            I got my license in the US some years ago, although I haven’t put it to as much use as I would like.

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                                                                              Yes, I’m an active ham (Extra) who enjoys digital modes and hacking on ham-related software, among other things. I also have some fun with SOTA.

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                                                                                SA6CJK here (from Sweden, which has a single license class with no renewals). I’m active on FT8 on HF every now and then. QRP has gotten easier with the new digital modes.

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                                                                                  Yes indeedy, finally got my license a few years ago even though radio has fascinated me since I was a kid.

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                                                                                    Yes. Anyway I’m only in for APRS, SSTV and weathersats.

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                                                                                      I do but I need to renew it, will likely get a new callsign since I moved to a new country. QRP is a very interesting technical challenge.

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                                                                                        I do. It’s a surprisingly big hobby, not just a more powerful CB.

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                                                                                          raises hand

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                                                                                          GMail has this somewhat built-in: username+anytextABC123@gmail.com.

                                                                                          It’s not that I’m advocating using GMail as a solution for privacy concerns :D, but if one day you’ll get a spam message containing the text username+servicename@gmail.com, you’ll know which service leaked the address ;).

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                                                                                            FastMail supports this as well. Additionally, they support (free) aliases on hundreds of very generic domains like “eml.cc”, which allows you to have a similar setup on those websites where a “+” in an email address is deemed to be an illegal character.

                                                                                            Mozilla’s new service covers more ground, though, and it’s far more automated than any of these approaches. I’m looking forward to it!

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                                                                                              Well, that will hold until the spammers start filtering out the +thing part of the email address before sending their stuff :(

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                                                                                                GMail has had + aliases for at least a decade or more. Spammers know about them but it doesn’t matter since Google’s spam filtering is quite aggressive anyway.

                                                                                                The more annoying thing is that either through ignorance or malice (I’ve encountered both), many mainstream services and websites will not let you use a + in an email address. They claim it’s not a valid character even though it most certainly is.

                                                                                                This was actually one of the main reasons I decided to host my own email, I can tell Postfix to use . as the alias separator, which all companies and web forms accept.

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                                                                                                  I know of sites that discard / disallow the plus sign because of abuse when they offer fremium services. So with user+one@example.com you get one month free, user+two@example.com a second one, etc.

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                                                                                                If you use your own domain, service@your.domain is always a thing..

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                                                                                                The following is not safe:

                                                                                                var=$(dirname "$f")

                                                                                                I…I had no idea! I was pretty sure I was safe because I rely so heavily on shellcheck.

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                                                                                                  Has anyone ever actually seen a file with a newline in the name?

                                                                                                  I mean this breaks with spaces at the end too but that also seems pretty oddball naming

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                                                                                                    Has anyone ever actually seen a file with a newline in the name?

                                                                                                    Yes. It was in the home directory of an entirely non-technical user – I don’t think save dialogs and other such file-naming GUI bits would generally allow that to hapen, so I’m not really sure how it could have arisen (perhaps an email attachment or web download with an externally-supplied filename?), but one day there it was, breaking things that assumed it wouldn’t be there…

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                                                                                                      I don’t write a ton of code, but when I must, I make a deliberate choice not to try to catch every conceivable corner case. Instead, I put my focus on explicitly catching and dealing with the most likely ways that things might go wrong, and sanitize data only where it absolutely must be sanitized. (And further, there is something to be said as well for maintaining a sane data set, but that’s a can of worms for another day.)

                                                                                                      Sometimes this irritates my co-workers. For example, when writing to a file in Python, there are a bunch of things that can go wrong. But I don’t need to check for all of them, because Python has exceptions built in and it will tell you when something unexpected happened by throwing an exception. Wtih an informative traceback and everything. It’s all built right into the language! All the programmer really has to do is make sure that data is not destroyed when Something Bad happens. And maybe post a “whoops, something went wrong message” if the program is being executed by a non-technical user, at the very worst.

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                                                                                                        What you are noting is that there is a cost in readability, maintenance, and likelihood of mistakes in dotting every single i.

                                                                                                        Sometimes, that cost might be worth paying. Sometimes, the cure is worse than the disease.

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                                                                                                        Has anyone ever actually seen a file with a newline in the name?

                                                                                                        On purpose? No. By accident? Yes.

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                                                                                                          Probably, but this only breaks with a newline at the end, which seems way less likely to me.

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                                                                                                            well technically var=$(dirname "$f") will break with whitespace anywhere, because the call isn’t quoted. But var="$(dirname "$f")" would only break with it at the end, yes.

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                                                                                                              It won’t, actually; word splitting and globbing don’t apply to variable assignments. It doesn’t apply to word in case word in either.

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                                                                                                                Huh, learn something new every day.

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                                                                                                        Holy. Cow. This is the most information I have ever seen on Unix timekeeping in one place. This should be published as an O’Reilly animal book. Seriously, good stuff.

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                                                                                                          Thank you, I hope that after reading this article you should mostly know the ins and outs of time on Unix and understand most of the jargon. I tried to make it as approachable as possible.

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                                                                                                            Just a heads-up: tags are filtered individually, so if any one of the tags there are filtered people won’t see this. So, the fewer tags the better.

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                                                                                                          Wrap neovim (or just a damn good vim emulation) and there will just be a whiff of dust where my vscode window used to be

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                                                                                                            Nice article. Can anyone of elders give more information on shell word from the old times?

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                                                                                                              Apparently, the original Multics shell (sense 1) was so called because it was a shell (sense 3); it ran user programs not by starting up separate processes, but by dynamically linking the programs into its own code, calling them as subroutines, and then dynamically de-linking them on return.

                                                                                                              Source: http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/S/shell.html

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                                                                                                                Wow, thats a nice gem of a site. Much appreciated.

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                                                                                                              I could spent hours browsing through content like this, very nice!

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                                                                                                                Then you would enjoy the jargon file