1. 11

    except… that’s not what a false flag is…

    A false flag operation is flying/painting/wearing someone else’s flag with intent to deceive an adversary about who is engaging in the operation for some strategic purpose. (Usually to keep the enemy off their guard or avoid political blame.) The who is important. The Go team neither raised nor withdrew the propsal while pretending to be someone else.

    What TFA describes is merely ulterior motive.

    Further, and I have zero horses in this game since I don’t know Go, the propsal review committee dude stated pretty well why the proposal was being declined: communication and collaboration around the proposal sucked and it was either solving a problem that a lot of people didn’t believe was actually a real problem, or it didn’t solve the problem well enough, I can’t tell. Hard to see how that’s a bad thing. First rule of language improvements should always be, first do no harm. Far better to miss a potentially useful feature than to have to deal with the consequences of a poorly executed one for decades after.

    1.  

      At this point, I think the meaning of “false flag” has faded so much that almost no one bat an eye when reading the article.

      Further, it’s not just a proposal with an ulterior motive; the proposal in itself was false and untruthful (if we accept the theory).

    1. 2

      Lets see how this can turn out on a raspberry pi (version: 1, model: B, Raspbian Buster):

      root@rpi:/# dmesg | grep -E "(rng|random)"
      [    0.000000] random: get_random_bytes called from start_kernel+0x8c/0x49c with crng_init=0
      [    0.374000] bcm2835-rng 20104000.rng: hwrng registered
      [    2.107462] random: fast init done
      [    7.005858] random: systemd: uninitialized urandom read (16 bytes read)
      [    7.072358] random: systemd: uninitialized urandom read (16 bytes read)
      [    7.101514] random: systemd: uninitialized urandom read (16 bytes read)
      [   35.634711] random: crng init done
      [   35.634733] random: 7 urandom warning(s) missed due to ratelimiting
      

      Yikes! 35 seconds! Even with hwrng! This could have easily been much worse!

      So what did we learn from this?

      • It can take up to 1h40m before your linux-server in a virtual machine comes up. It can take tens of minutes before your non-virtual linux server boots up.
      • If you want a quick and permanent, but flawed fix, you have to enable RDRAND (of which we can reasonably assume that it has been compromised).
      • If this happens to you on server machines, spend the 50$ for a chaoskey (or some other similar entropy source) for every server to be done with this failure mode once and for all (If the number of servers you run is small enough for this to be feasible, that is).
      • Forward the host entropy pool to the guests and/or any containers.
      • If you’re in a pinch and find yourself in front of a machine that doesn’t come up:
        • If you can afford it: just stoically wait it out for at most 2 hours.
        • If you need the machine to boot up quickly, connect a mouse or keyboard and make some random moves or hit some random keys.

      This is a fine mess….

      1. 1

        If you want a quick and permanent, but flawed fix, you have to enable RDRAND (of which we can reasonably assume that it has been compromised).

        If you don’t trust the random number generator in your CPU, what is the basis upon which you decide to trust the rest of the CPU?

        If this happens to you on server machines, spend the 50$ for a chaoskey

        What makes the STM32F042 microcontroller more trustworthy as a source of entropy than the CPU? Is it open hardware? With a third-party auditable manufacturing process?

        1. 1

          If you don’t trust the random number generator in your CPU, what is the basis upon which you decide to trust the rest of the CPU?

          It’s not about trust in the CPU. It’s about having trust in what has been used to encrypt data that leaves the CPU.

          What makes the STM32F042 microcontroller more trustworthy as a source of entropy than the CPU? Is it open hardware? With a third-party auditable manufacturing process?

          The fact that the attached circuit is a sensible source for thermal noise and the fact that I can verify that.

          1. 1

            On a v4.19 or newer kernel, make sure you either built with CONFIG_RANDOM_TRUST_CPU=y or booted with “random.trust_cpu=on” to jump-start the pRNG.

            And if you want even more entropy, get one of these: https://altusmetrum.org/ChaosKey/

        1. 3

          I use OPNSense at home on an APU2 board and except for an exceptionally slow boot time measuring minutes long, I’m very much impressed at how well it works. Best open source home firewall/router software by a long shot. Some of the PHP code is a little on the scary side but I think the majority of that was inherited from pfSense.

          1. 1

            People don’t care that an application is a streamlined 3MB or a big round 200MB boy – they care that it works for them and it makes them feel good about using it.

            Wrong

            1. 3

              Neither is correct. The right answer is that some people care about the efficiency of the programs they use, and some people don’t. Additionally their reasons for caring or not caring, and which programs this decision applies to vary greatly.

              1. 1

                I care, hence the statement that ‘people don’t care’ is incorrect

                1. 1

                  I think we’re in agreement on that point?

            1. 7

              Can you not just take any other web browser, change its user agent to match a mobile browser, and then shrink the window? Firefox even has a “responsive design mode” built right in that’s two-clicks away.

              1. 1

                Being able to browse the mobile web on desktop is a game changer.

                1. 4

                  Please elaborate because for all I know you could just be using sarcasm very effectively and I’m honestly wondering if I’m missing something interesting :)

                  1. 2

                    You have to change the user agent on other browsers and even then you might not trigger the mobile version. Apple WebView + iPhone UA + iPhone sized viewport = mobile web on desktop.

                    Try to browser mobile version of LinkedIn on any browser. On Monochrome works exactly like on iPhone.

              1. 2

                How can this be spam when I’m not the author of this story?

                1. 20

                  It reads like a marketing brag piece, and the product is apparently in “private alpha” so nobody here can test its claims.

                  1. 5

                    Spam is the closest thing to “this is a bad article”.

                    Alternatives:

                    • Off-topic -> clearly about IT/Technology/Sciences
                    • Already Posted -> not already posted (the link would appear at the bottom)
                    • Broken Link -> link works just fine

                    So, we are left with “Spam”: a catch all, which includes “Rubbish” but also “Marketing”, “Low Effort”, “Just Absolute Bollocks” and more.

                    1. 5

                      Spam is the closest thing to “this is a bad article”.

                      IMO off-topic is better used for this, e.g. when someone posts something that would fit in better on HN, even if it’s tech-related, it can be off topic for this site.

                      1. 0

                        Now this is interesting. You felt the need to “downvote” this story because you don’t like it, and you chose the only flag which could possibly be interpreted as “bad content”, under the assumption that on-topic “bad content” is something that you should be able to flag. I feel like you’re abusing the flag in doing so, but I also imagine that this form of abuse is quite common. In any case, it’s quite “low effort” on your part.

                        I suggest we would all be better served if you would instead articulate what you dislike about the story.

                        1. 2

                          Oi dude, don’t assume things out in the wild and then feel like you should be the one preaching the solution.

                          I just replied to OP’s comment, nothing else.

                      2. 5

                        I’m used to languages and development/orchestration tools being open source or at least something you can download an play with. Since I can’t do that, then or all practical purposes, as far as I’m concerned this Dark thing does not actually exist. And since it doesn’t exist, then reading about all of its impressive (and likely inflated) claims was a huge waste of my time.

                        (I didn’t flag, downvote, or upvote the story, however.)

                        1. 1

                          Commenting on a story acts like upvoting it, so you should probably flag it (that’s what I’m doing right now to cancel out my comment).

                      1. 6

                        Missing from the list, everyone seems to pronounce daemon as “daymon” but I’ve always thought it should be pronounced as “deemon” otherwise you have to start saying “ayon” for aeon and “encyclopaydia” as well. You know, for consistency.

                        1. 1

                          Wait, is aeon not “ayon”? I assumed it was, and eon in “eeyon”.

                          1. 1

                            Depends on how you pronounce the y.

                            1. 1

                              There may be a case for differentiation for certain uses but I’m a simple peasant so I consider æon and and eon to be the same word since they both mean unspecified long stretches of time (longer than an era).

                            2. 1

                              The Greek roots disagree with you for daimon [1] and aion [2]. Of course we don’t necessarily pronounce things as their roots, so this isn’t intended as a normative response.

                              [1] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daemon_(classical_mythology)

                              [2] https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aion_(deity)

                              1. 1

                                Sure, but–and bearing in mind that I’m in no way a linguistics scholar, so huge grain of salt here–regardless of its roots the ancient Æ ligature has no direct English equivalent vowel sound so it was simplified to long e almost everywhere for the purposes of modern English. E.g. “ether” for “æther” and “medieval” for “mediæval”.

                                For whatever it’s worth, the cambridge dictionary agrees with me :) https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/english/daemon

                            1. 1

                              So it’s a Javascript REPL and a TCL repl and you can switch back and forth? What’s the use case, or is it just for fun?

                              A much younger me tried unsuccessfully to learn Perl as my first programming language. I could write trivial programs in it but nothing terribly useful. I would get bogged down in minutia and terse documentation and almost concluded that I was just no good at programming. (This was long before StackOverbutt existed.) Then someone I knew on IRC suggested that I try Tcl/Tk. Within 30 minutes of hearing about it, I had a prototype of something I had been trying unsuccessfully to do in Perl for weeks. It’s not a language that has aged very well but I wrote a lot of cool and useful shit with Tcl/Tk and for that reason it will always have a special place in my heart.

                              1. 2

                                I’m not sure why you think Tcl hasn’t aged well, it’s definitely maintained and growing new features and just as productive to use at any point in time.

                                This demo is a Tcl REPL – you’re typing into a tty on my server and tclreadline is reading what you type and sending it to an instance of Duktape via tcl-duktape. Additionally, within that Duktape instance I’ve added all the Tcl commands of the interpreter it was created from into it as the “runtime” object so you can, for example, call “runtime.puts(‘Hello World’)” or implement something like you might see in NodeJS (since Tcl is heavily async):

                                /*
                                 * JavaScript using the Tcl runtime:
                                 */
                                server = runtime.socket('-server', function(sock, addr, port) {
                                	console.info("New connect from", addr, port, "as", sock);
                                	runtime.fileevent(sock, 'readable', function() {
                                		var line, e;
                                
                                		try {
                                			line = runtime.gets(sock);
                                			if (runtime.eof(sock) && line === '') {
                                				console.info("EOF on sock", sock, "from", addr, port);
                                
                                				runtime.close(sock);
                                				return;
                                			}
                                		
                                			console.debug("New data from", sock, ":", line);
                                		} catch (e) {
                                			console.error("Error processing sock", sock, ":", e);
                                			console.info("Closing sock", sock, "from", addr, port);
                                			runtime.close(sock);
                                		}
                                	});
                                }, 9313);
                                
                                
                                /*
                                 * Pure Tcl version:
                                 *
                                 * set server [socket -server {apply {{sock addr port} {
                                 *     puts "I> New connect from $addr $port as $sock"
                                 *     fileevent $sock readable [list apply {{sock addr port} {
                                 *         try {
                                 *             set line [gets $sock]
                                 *             if {[eof $sock] && $line eq ""} {
                                 *                 puts "I> EOF on sock $sock from $addr $port"
                                 *
                                 *                 close $sock
                                 *                 return
                                 *             }
                                 *
                                 *             puts "D> New data from $sock : $line"
                                 *         } on error e {
                                 *             puts "E> Error processing sock $sock : $e"
                                 *             puts "I> Closing sock $sock from $addr $port"
                                 *             close $sock
                                 *         }
                                 *     }} $sock $addr $port]
                                 * }}} 9313]
                                 */
                                
                                1. 1

                                  I’m not sure why you think Tcl hasn’t aged well, it’s definitely maintained and growing new features and just as productive to use at any point in time.

                                  from my recent perspective as someone who is new to tcl: tcl-lang.org contains dead links and the wiki contains many entries from a decade ago (which isn’t necessarily a bad thing). this can look as if the language isn’t well maintained. reading the mailing list shows a really active community, but mailing lists aren’t the go-to place for information anymore today. i guess polishing the website would be good marketing-wise :)

                              1. 41

                                Am I the only one shocked by the poverty wages paid in open source? I make more a day than that project makes a month and not by a small margin.

                                The current open source licenses have failed us completely when middlemen make billions while coders make less than minimum wage.

                                1. 11

                                  Am I the only one shocked by the poverty wages paid in open source? I make more a day than that project makes a month and not by a small margin.

                                  Probably because giving away something for free and then holding out your hat afterward in expectation of payment is a shitty business model. It barely works for some musicians, it doesn’t work at all as a faceless github account on the Internet.

                                  If you want to make money doing what you love to do, you have to create a workable business model around it. And the thing about businesses is that sometimes they work and sometimes they don’t. Just because you create a thing doesn’t mean you are suddenly entitled to receive a profit from it. The thing you make or do needs to have value to others, you have to prove that value to them, you need a system for delivering that value, and then make it easy for them to pay you for it. There are plenty of companies doing well enough with their own spin on a combination of open source with commercial opportunity. Like any other business, it’s not easy and many fail. But it is possible.

                                  The current open source licenses have failed us completely

                                  Incorrect, they work exactly as they were intended to work. The majority of open source software is given away with no expectation of anything tangible in return. Open source software (generally) gets written because someone had an itch to scratch and wanted to share the results or their work with a community. The authors may have many motivations for giving away their code (altruism, recognition, social interaction) but none of them are to make a bunch of money.

                                  Finally, I have no opinion of the musl project but if they actually want donations, they’re doing a very good job of hiding that fact on their website.

                                  1. 4

                                    Really? He makes only slightly less than half of what I make (and it probably goes a lot further for him), and I consider myself well-compensated by the standards of the amount of work I put in (if not well-compensated by the standards of this industry, where dev wages are hugely inflated).

                                    1. 4

                                      You are not the only one.

                                      1. 3

                                        The current open source licenses have failed us completely

                                        Some licenses are way more permissive towards freeloading than others.

                                        1. 1

                                          That’s true, but there’s another twist to it, right?

                                          Giving away the source code freely and then having freeloading (e.g., not pushing changes upstream or sharing source code they link with) services live behind an inscrutable wall (network service, usually) makes catching violations very difficult. At least with a binary you can decompile it and get an idea of what libraries were used–there are no such easy fruit for web applications if even the slightest effort is put into it.

                                          1. 0

                                            Yes, SaaS make violations difficult to catch. However, licensing can make such “dark pattern” too risky or too unpractical to be used at a large scale.

                                            Unfortunately license adoption needs a critical mass is needed for this to work. If 90% of software stays under very permissive licenses freeloading will not stop.

                                        2. 1

                                          It depends on purchasing power, right?

                                          There are countries even in continental Europe where a small Patreon campaign can match a lawyer’s salary.

                                          Also a reason to not donate to larger projects through Patreon is that it’s impossible for the project management to accomodate everyone. People without that much disposable income, who would prefer to pay for specific features, even if they are on the roadmap but not a priority, may choose to keep their money instead.

                                          Or buy into a more commercial solution to get what they need without the open-source politics.

                                          1. -5

                                            A single lawyer can’t save a company several million in opex a month. I’ve have.

                                            I don’t quite understand why the go to example of people trying to explain to me why I should be getting paid less are jobs which have no inherent ability to scale, be it lawyer, doctor or building architect and whose only reason for being highly paid is a cartel keeping wages inflated. Here’s hoping we import enough Cuban doctors or Latvian lawyers that their wages reflect the difficulty of their job and the demand for it.

                                            1. 24

                                              Please don’t dismiss other people’s work just because you don’t understand what they do. Of course a single lawyer can save a company millions in operating expenses per month, and their profession has been doing it for far longer than we have.

                                              1. -5

                                                [[citation needed]]

                                                I have seen teams lawyers cost the opposing side tens of millions pretty easily, I have never seen them save money inside a company that wasn’t being sued. In short, a zero sum profession, with a high bar to entry and a marvelously developed class consciousness. Good job if you can get it. I only wish developers could develop that sense too, because we add actual value in the trillions.

                                                1. 13

                                                  I have seen teams lawyers cost the opposing side tens of millions pretty easily, I have never seen them save money inside a company that wasn’t being sued.

                                                  There’s a good reason you might not see it. By having proper policies and procedures in place to comply with the law, lawyers can save a company money by understanding the law and ensuring that they don’t get fined or sued. For example, breaking wage and hour laws in New York can be very expensive. One of the fines listed is $50 per employee per day. There are like 65,000 fast food workers alone in NYC. If all of the companies failed to comply, that would total over $3 mil / day in just fines. That’s before all the lawsuits that would probably also show up.

                                                  Also interesting, if the guys racking up tens of millions lose their case, they might end up paying those tens of millions back to the people they sued because of laws regarding recovery of attorney’s fees, or counter-suits.

                                                  In short, a zero sum profession, with a high bar to entry and a marvelously developed class consciousness. Good job if you can get it. I only wish developers could develop that sense too, because we add actual value in the trillions.

                                                  I’m wary any time someone talks about how great software engineering is or developers are. Were the people who wrote the code to do spoofing and layering adding actual value? How about the engineers and developers behind the Clipper chip?

                                                  1. 4

                                                    It’s not always a zero sum game, there are (unethical) agencies who make multi million euros a year by sending cease and desist letters for allegedly (and often false) copyright violations. Sadly, it took many years until this practice was prevent by the government in Germany, maybe because about half of the politicians are lawyers themselves.

                                                    Update: typo

                                                    1. 3

                                                      You can bet Goodwill consulted a lawyer before implementing this cost-cutting strategy.

                                                  2. 8

                                                    A single lawyer can’t save a company several million in opex a month.

                                                    Not to take away from your point, but they absolutely can: M&A, restructuring, downsizing, RightSizing™. And so on. I personally know a lawyer whose sole job is to fly around BoA offices around the world shitcanning [redundant] people.

                                                    I don’t quite understand why the go to example of people trying to explain to me why I should be getting paid less…

                                                    Because people like free stuff and one obvious way they get free stuff is if you work for free.

                                                    However if zig is successful, Andrew will likely get hired at a big marketing company like Google or Facebook where he’ll lead a charge to zig all the things with a nice fat salary doubled up with lots of RSU. It’s a bold move, and not for everyone, but using a “open source career” to bootstrap an enterprise retirement is easy enough to do that (while the markets are good) people are doing it on accident.

                                                    1. 16

                                                      That’s not my plan. I might consider working at a place like Mozilla but never Google or Facebook. I’m looking into starting my own non-profit company. Do you know how amazing it is to not have a manager?

                                                      1. 7

                                                        Can I suggest you start a for-profit company instead and make a nice life for yourself? There’s nothing unethical about charging customers money for the tools you build. It’s worked quite nicely for me and I hate to see fellow OSS enthusiasts scrape by and play down their own value to society.

                                                        1. 6

                                                          I appreciate that you’re looking out for my interests, but why not start a non-profit company and make a nice life for myself and others? Non-profits are allowed to charge customers money for tools. There’s nothing stopping me from having a nice salary in a non-profit.

                                                          1. 4

                                                            What is the benefit of a non-profit vs a privately owned company that can do what it wants? I suppose I can see why a programming language steward company might be a non profit.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              While @mperham is one of the best examples I know of for turning a profit and contributing to the community (maybe followed by Richard Hipp/sqlite), may I augment his suggestion with that of a Benefit corporation if that suits your priorities better?

                                                              It seems to me that the bigger problem for you (vs @mperham) is that almost everybody expects language toolchains to be free at this point (there are some exceptions, but most of those seem like legacy / gigantic enterprise work).

                                                              But either way, I hope to see you continue the great work!

                                                          2. 2

                                                            Reminds me of a quote from one of my favorite movies:

                                                            Free winds and no tyranny for you? Freddie, sailor of the seas. You pay no rent. Free to go where you please. Then go. Go to that landless latitude, and good luck.

                                                            For if you figure a way to live without serving a master, any master, then let the rest us know, will you? For you’d be the first person in the history of the world.

                                                            Lancaster Dodd

                                                          3. 0

                                                            Not to take away from your point, but they absolutely can: M&A, restructuring, downsizing, RightSizing™. And so on. I personally know a lawyer whose sole job is to fly around BoA offices around the world shitcanning [redundant] people.

                                                            I said single, any push like that would require a team of at least a dozen. On average, sure, a team of 50 lawyers can for a small investment of 10 million get you a couple of billion in roi.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              I’ve personally seen a single lawyer acting as in-house counsel and compliance officer in a heavily regulated space save the company millions in potential fines, and tens (if not hundreds) of thousands in filing and process fees.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I want to use one of these as a router, but I’m concerned that all the USB3 to Gigabit Ethernet dongles will be garbage. Anyone have any experience with those, good or bad?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Another option would be to use vlans.

                                                        I used an Intel NUC with one eth interface as a router for about a year. I just hooked it up to a small managed switch to create a couple of vlans, one for internet and one for lan, that both get pushed to the port for the router. Then you just setup a couple of virtual interfaces in the OS and it work just like a device with two physical interfaces.

                                                        The only downside then is that you’re basically making your connection half-duplex. You can still get gigabit in either direction, but not both at the same time.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I was thinking the same thing when I saw USB3 support. My current router had an on-board Ethernet port die on it and I switched it out to a USB3-Ethernet gigabit adapter. It works fine. It’s just got a standard RealTek r8152 chip in it … the USB3-Ethernet chip is typically going to be a standard RealTek, Broadcom or Atheros on most of these devices and they should function the same as their PCI equivalents.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I considered the same thing by my conclusion is that GbE dongles are a mixed bag. Some don’t work, some work but fail intermittently. (Which is really what you don’t want on a router.) There must be some that work fine for a long time but I couldn’t find anyone who already did the research on this and shared it. I ended up buying a PCEngines APU2 for my router/firewall at home. It’s much more capable than a Raspberry Pi and only costs a bit more after you include all the dongles and drives and such that you would need for a Raspberry Pi.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I haven’t tried it, but this seems like an good board for a router: https://www.hardkernel.com/shop/odroid-h2/ And its uses X86 which is a plus or a minus depending on your point of view or usage.

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Since they seem to be positioning this as a credible (lightweight) desktop machine, I wonder if they’ve done anything about the SD card speeds. Improving the graphics, cpu and memory but leaving it stuck at ~20 MB/s on it’s only internal storage device makes it seem… not so compelling to me.

                                                              1. 6

                                                                Booting from USB is supported since RPi3, I’m not sure I would bother with SD cards on RPi these days unless physical space is an issue.

                                                                Edit: This benchmark article (sorry it’s Medium) shows SD card performance has improved a little but USB 3.0 throughput is about an order of magnitude higher than SD card throughput on the RPi 4: https://medium.com/@ghalfacree/benchmarking-the-raspberry-pi-4-73e5afbcd54b

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  It’s good to see that SD perf has improved, even if not by all that much. (And the USB gains look great!)

                                                                  I think my issue is not only physical space, but also an aversion to the idea of having the boot drive able to be accidentally unplugged. But maybe that’s just me…

                                                                2. 3

                                                                  Is that a constraint of SD or the Pi?

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    I think it’s mostly a hardware limitation on the Pi, but I’m not an expert. Lots of people report similar boards having much better IO performance (e.g. Odroid), and also that the IO rates on SD cards are much better in an adapter on a laptop/desktop machine.

                                                                    From http://www.pidramble.com/wiki/benchmarks/microsd-cards:

                                                                    Note that most of the above benchmarks, when run on a USB 3.0 card reader on my MacBook Air, show 5, 10, or 15 times greater performance in that environment

                                                                    I guess I could actually run some benchmarks myself when I get home tonight…

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      USB 3 SSD seems like a reasonable option

                                                                  2. 1

                                                                    Do you think that’s a hardware limitation on the computer side or simply a desire to support every SD card, not just the newer faster ones?

                                                                  1. 6

                                                                    “Secure” NTP (NTS) sounds like a good idea and I guess if you’re already using CloudFlare on your hosts for stuff, then it makes sense to use them as a time server, but for the rest of us I don’t really quite see what would make me switch away from the public NTP pool

                                                                    (But don’t get me wrong, I am continually impressed at how much cool shit CloudFlare offers for free. Hopefully they don’t eventually go down the Google path and start killing off things that are used by a lot of people 2-3 years from now.)

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Nice work. I think there’s something to be said for small programs that solve a simple problem and are easy to fit into other systems. I’ve been meaning write something very similar to this but using content-addressable storage. (Instead of a random filename, each image or blob is named after a hash of its content). That of course slows the whole thing down a lot but for the applications I have in mind, that’s a fair trade-off.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Seamonkey is like the Windows XP of web browsers. Horribly out of date but still hanging on despite all common sense…

                                                                        1. 5

                                                                          I don’t agree. In terms of functionality and interface, it’s one of the best browsers out there, and it’s one of the only WYSIWYG HTML editors out there.

                                                                          I think its continued existence is healthy for the web ecosystem; I’m afraid that sentiments like the one in your comment are increasingly leading to a monoculture controlled by Google.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Preaching to the choir, buddy. I used Seamonkey back when it was just called “Mozilla” and “Netscape Navigator” before that. And then on and off once Firefox became a thing. It’s sad that they’ve basically just been playing catch-up to Firefox since.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Well, I didn’t know you were part of the choir. It didn’t seem that way from your original comment.

                                                                              It’s sad that they’ve basically just been playing catch-up to Firefox since.

                                                                              Yes, Seamonkey is a great piece of software, and it’s sad that they don’t have enough resources or developers to properly maintain and develop it.

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          Very impressive write-up, as usual. The only nit I could pick would be this:

                                                                          Why one would built such appliance? Because its a lot cheaper then to get the ‘branded’ one. Think about Dell EMC Data Domain for example – and not just ‘any’ Data Domain but almost the highest one – the Data Domain DD9300 at least. It would cost about ten times more at least … with smaller capacity and taking not 4U but closer to 14U with three DS60 expanders.

                                                                          I’m not familiar with the Data Domain product line in particular but there are reasons why enterprise-grade storage products cost so much, and the top ones tend to be: responsive customer support, redundancy, replication, and scalability. On this Tyan system, if the motherboard goes kaput, and you don’t happen to have a cold spare sitting in the closet, you’re dead in the water until a new one arrives. The Dell system probably has two independent controller modules and will continue to work fine if one gives up the magic smoke. I’ll give the Tyan system the benefit of the doubt and assume that the disks can be hot-swapped without taking down the system because with this many disks, replacing them is going to be a fairly regular occurrence.

                                                                          I definitely want to play around with ZFS more but one of the things that keeps me from trying it in an enterprise setting is the apparent lack of horizontal scalability. There is, I’m lead to believe, snapshot-based replication which is fine for some purposes but it’s not real-time replication like you would need for instantaneous failover to another site. And someone correct me if I’m wrong but I haven’t seen a way to scale a ZFS filesystem beyond a single box. If I were homebrewing a storage system for business use, I would be much more likely to reach for Ceph because it can scale more or less effortlessly and in a big enough deployment you can lose a whole system or three and still be running just fine.

                                                                          But don’t get me wrong, I understand well that there are environments where uptime is not king and the ability to deploy a massive storage system at an affordable price is more important. (I’m just glad I don’t have to support it. :P)

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            responsive customer support\

                                                                            You know what that means in Dell EMC dictionary? Poorly paid people from India … and yes that comes with all drawbacks you can think off … their support is terrible.

                                                                            redundancy

                                                                            The Data Domain systems have no redundancy by default (despice being priced that high).

                                                                            You can have redundancy with two such systems but its additional 2x price, which means 20x price instead of 10x price versus my solution.

                                                                            replication

                                                                            I did not specified that at the article but I ‘have’ two such systems so ZFS send/recv between them is obvious :)

                                                                            scalability

                                                                            Like with Data Domain its just scale up, not scale out, so its another ‘tie’.

                                                                            On this Tyan system, if the motherboard goes kaput, and you don’t happen to have a cold spare sitting in the closet, you’re dead in the water until a new one arrives. The Dell system probably has two independent controller modules and will continue to work fine if one gives up the magic smoke.

                                                                            Like I said above, its also single board for Data Domain system, and with needed/optional redundancy its 20x cosc instead of 10x …

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              There is, I’m lead to believe, snapshot-based replication which is fine for some purposes but it’s not real-time replication like you would need for instantaneous failover to another site.

                                                                              True, but NetApp devices have the same capability. NetApps separately have a replica sync, but so does FreeNAS. I think the place where NetApp wins here is the fact that their enterprise controllers (the server endpoints that manage the storage) are always paired, while I don’t think FreeNAS has the same capability yet. TrueNAS (the commercial fork of FreeNAS) does have HA capabilities.

                                                                              So, it’s closer to enterprise-ready than you might think.

                                                                              And someone correct me if I’m wrong but I haven’t seen a way to scale a ZFS filesystem beyond a single box.

                                                                              ZFS itself works best if you know the expected size of your “zpools” up-front, yeah. It can scale them up, but it’s annoying, and you can’t scale them back down if things change. FreeNAS inherits that limitation.

                                                                              That said, if you’re worried about adding rackmounts, a single FreeNAS node can be hooked up to multiple JBOD chassis, and you can add those easily enough. If you’re worried about adding compute to a given ZFS volume, that’s a separate issue, and, yeah, FreeNAS can’t do that afaik.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              The link to the Tyan chassis is bork

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                Thanks for reporting this, fixed :)

                                                                              1. 12

                                                                                This appeals to me. However:

                                                                                But how can I then keep the style and layout of all my posts and pages in sync? Simple: don’t! It’s more fun that way. Look at this website: if you read any previous blog post, you’ll notice that they have a different stylesheet. This is because they were written at different times. As such, they’re like time capsules.

                                                                                While that’s kind of cool in its own way, I don’t prefer it. Especially when it comes to a site menu.

                                                                                My first web sites were hand-coded HTML. My motivation to learn PHP was that I wanted a consistent menu across all pages, and copy-paste was not maintainable, so I landed on PHP’s include. From there it was down the rabbit hole to becoming a web developer.

                                                                                I use a static site generator now for nathanmlong.com, which I mostly write in Markdown. It wouldn’t kill me to write HTML, but I don’t want to copy and paste a menu everywhere.

                                                                                1. 8

                                                                                  Case in point about the downsides, the cv link is correct on the author’s homepage. It is not correct on this page. That’s an easy mistake to make, and I’ve definitely made versions of it. However, it’s much more pleasant to fix when you can fix it everywhere by updating a template.

                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                    Thanks for the heads up :-)

                                                                                    Edit: Solved by sed -i 's,href="cv",href="../cv",' */*.html. In my mind, simpler than a CMS or static site generator.

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      “Simpler”, sure, maybe. At least for now. But maybe it won’t always be such a trivial sed command. Maybe you wrote the html slightly different in certain spots.

                                                                                      A simple or custom-built static site generator would avoid mistakes like this altogether. You could have one file for your head element. Nicer menus, sidebar, etc. And you could still write most or all of it in pure html if you wanted to.

                                                                                      Simpler doesn’t necessarily mean better.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        If you need the same template for all of your pages, then yes – a templating engine is a good idea.

                                                                                        But if you don’t need this, then a templating system makes the process unnecessarily complicated. Creating a template in a special language and fitting all pages to the same mold takes much more effort than most realize, especially in comparison with just writing single HTML pages.

                                                                                        For example, look at my software page. I have some fancy HTML and CSS to render sidenotes in the margin (unless you use a small screen). Because the page is “self-contained”, I don’t have to worry if I ever edit the style sheet for other posts. But if I used a templating engine, I would have to worry about it.

                                                                                  2. 5

                                                                                    Everything old is new again (or something like that)… you can always use server side includes for common elements.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      I like keeping my content and the final HTML site separate, and using the content to generate the site. It makes my content more flexible, but also makes generating the global menus easy, which is important to me so that my readers get a good experience.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        I haven’t actually used it but the caddy web server appears to have built-in templating features: https://caddyserver.com/docs/template-actions

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          Dreamweaver supported keeping sites’ themes consistent when I tried it long ago. It was templates or something. Maybe one of the open editors can do that, too. Otherwise, it would be a good feature for them to add.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            I hear you. I think the obvious solution then is to use something like PHP or SSI. Of course, that’s another layer of complexity, but not as much as a static site generator or CSS.

                                                                                          1. 8

                                                                                            So, an interesting side effect of the GPL is you’re effectively banning your software from being run in large enterprise environments with legal departments that are concerned that having any GPL code will be infectious and that Stallman will come and steal all their monies :)

                                                                                            Our socialist free software utopia is ripe for exploitation by capitalists, and they’ll be rewarded for doing so. Capitalism is about enriching yourself - not enriching your users and certainly not enriching society.

                                                                                            IMO this boils down to whether or not you think capitalism is inherently exploitative at its base or whether it can also be a force for good.

                                                                                            I’m on the fence on this one. I would love to live in a post materialism utopia, and in that world, I would be utterly in favor of the GPL and the total freedoms it guarantees.

                                                                                            But in this world, the world where my choices are profit or die (quite literally in my case) , I’m less convinced that profiting from other people’s work when it’s a gift, ostensibly freely given, is inherently exploitative.

                                                                                            I give people free software because I want them to reciprocate with the same. That’s really all the GPL does.

                                                                                            This right here? This is the best articulation of all the hurt and anger I see around companies like the one I work for building commercial products based on OSS code bases. This actually makes sense to me, and is perfectly reasonable.

                                                                                            Permissive licenses were designed to allow for commercial use of the licensed work, so having expectations to the contrary seem like a recipe for disappointment to me. Rather than being outraged, software authors should choose licenses that will do what they want and mean, and save their energy for creating more awesome software :)

                                                                                            As others have said it’s a great article - super thoughtful and well written. Thanks for posting it!

                                                                                            1. 8

                                                                                              I’m on the fence on this one. I would love to live in a post materialism utopia, and in that world, I would be utterly in favor of the GPL and the total freedoms it guarantees.

                                                                                              There’s great irony here; as the article points out, in such a world the GPL wouldn’t exist, because it would be pointless.

                                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                                More correctly, it would be unnecessary. Like in the scientific environment, where people don’t feel the need for reciprocity and anti-troll clauses when publishing a paper.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  In the scientific environment, most of it gets put behind paywalls even though that isn’t strictly necessary. I think they also give them the copyrights, too, in many cases. There’s been more papers on the open sites recently. So, we might look at the scientific environment like software when it was mostly proprietary with a strong upswing of F/OSS.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    most of it gets put behind paywalls

                                                                                                    Researchers are not being paid by that and that’s also besides the point. There are no restrictions on the concepts of the paper, e.g. a theorem. Readers can teach the theorem to other people or use it without some legal restriction (e.g. being required to provide citation or not to sue the author of the theorem)

                                                                                                2. 5

                                                                                                  There’s great irony here; as the article points out, in such a world the GPL wouldn’t exist, because it would be pointless.

                                                                                                  My understanding is that GPL is exactly that: a copyright way of fighting copyright. From what I remember Stallman basically created it to restore the world to the state it was before people started copyrighting software: hardware came with the full source code and you could modify whatever you wanted. Kinda like the freedom @SirCmpwn is describing in the article.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    You’re absolutely right. In a sense, the GPL exists to protect software author’s intent FROM capitalism and the legal mechanisms around it.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        He’d know. Look forward to reading that interview when I have more time.

                                                                                                  2. 9

                                                                                                    you’re effectively banning your software from being run in large enterprise environments

                                                                                                    This is generally false. Only some large companies are avoiding GPL. Only some versions of it (3). And only in some use-cases. Also, they can change their decision without asking you.

                                                                                                    IMO this boils down to whether or not you think capitalism is inherently exploitative at its base or whether it can also be a force for good.

                                                                                                    How can you leap to this conclusion from reading a license? Plenty of companies release software under conditions that are way more restrictive than GPL (closed source, partnership agreements, contribution agreements…).

                                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                                      This is generally false. Only some large companies are avoiding GPL. Only some versions of it (3). And only in some use-cases. Also, they can change their decision without asking you.

                                                                                                      I will absolutely cop to my statement being too general, but you’re going to far the other way. I can speak to at least several environments where this is in fact the case.

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        What, exactly, is the case? I’m aware of the internal policies of some FAANGS and other large companies.

                                                                                                        1. 8

                                                                                                          I can only speak for Google (having worked at the open source office), and our docs on GPL are here: https://opensource.google.com/docs/thirdparty/licenses/#restricted

                                                                                                          Google’s monorepo and strong launch tooling means that we have very high confidence that GPL code doesn’t sneak into code that it shouldn’t, and we take great pains to ensure that all OSS is separated into a separate directory tree to make sure that people don’t accidentally patch the library and trigger a reciprocal license. We can do this because we have the money to have an OSS office, because we have the money to build the tooling, and because we have the institutional support to be a good OSS neighbor.

                                                                                                          If I was CTO of a smaller company or one where all the code was federated into small repositories that I can’t track, I personally would ban GPL-style licenses. License forgiveness is certainly helpful, but once you’ve violated the license you are in a sticky situation where you have to either excise the library, or find employees who never looked at the code to clean-room implement it. Depending on how big that library is you might be very screwed. I would just see GPL as too dangerous.

                                                                                                          1. 6

                                                                                                            I would just see GPL as too dangerous.

                                                                                                            That’s basically the point. If you plan to restrict users, stay away from the code that was written to provide them with freedom :)

                                                                                                          2. 3

                                                                                                            The (small) company I work for (based in Sweden, sells software for telecoms) bans the use of GPL libraries.

                                                                                                            1. 5

                                                                                                              The company I work for (based in Finland, sells software for telecoms) also bans the use of GPL libraries. ;)

                                                                                                              1. 0

                                                                                                                There’s a pattern emerging. It’s… that we need to sell GPL license exemptions to telecoms. Oh yeah!

                                                                                                      2. 3

                                                                                                        Except GPL would actually allow you to make money as a creator by selling a dual license. If you released it as MIT, then well, too bad.

                                                                                                        1. 0

                                                                                                          Care to explain this a bit? MIT is a permissive license, so you can sell your work, as can others. What’s “too bad” about this?

                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                            Let’s say you have a library you wrote with MIT license that a company wants to use. You can’t sell them a license but you can sell them support. Most companies will simply not pay you.

                                                                                                            However, with GPL, companies are afraid to use your library for free because GPL would force them to open source. You can say “look, I can sell you a license and you won’t be forced to open source”. This is a dual license scheme where companies pay you for the right not to have to open their own code.

                                                                                                        2. 3

                                                                                                          you’re effectively banning your software from being run in large enterprise environments

                                                                                                          Are you ? AFAIK, you are not allowed to modify it privately or use it as an integral part of another solution. If you just use the tool as an end user on your own, I am 99% sure you can’t be approached by the layers. If I am wrong, I would also like to know :)

                                                                                                          1. 12

                                                                                                            The point is that these companies don’t actually care what the true legal implications are and just run away out of GPL phobia.

                                                                                                            The GPL is used commercially in many places, so if you think you can’t do business with the GPL you’re either mistaken or your business is shady.

                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                              The point is that these companies don’t actually care what the true legal implications are and just run away out of GPL phobia.

                                                                                                              I see it more as paranoia, but in some cases, paranoia grounded in cold hard fact. When you are the biggest target, your legal department needs to figure out how to protect said target from attack. In order to do that, it MUST set incredibly paranoid boundaries to protect the company’s liability.

                                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                                Sort of. Apple forbids all GPLv3 but Google doesn’t. Both of these have comparable legal departments and are equally attractive targets and ship about as equally important software. They shouldn’t come to different conclusions on GPlv3.

                                                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                                                You and @feoh are talking about different thing which I don’t care for. I talk about legal stuff only, not about human psychology here. Please focus on topic.

                                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                                  No, this is the topic. You’re “effectively banning” your software because those companies have internal rules to ban any GPL software. They don’t care what the actual rules are, because effectively they have decided to interpret them their own way.

                                                                                                                  Legal stuff is human psychology anyway, you have to convince a judge and a jury, who are fallible, biased, manipulatable humans.

                                                                                                              3. 1

                                                                                                                You are. Speaking from my personal experience at one such large corporate enterprise, use of GPL licensed software is straight up banned.

                                                                                                                1. 6

                                                                                                                  I don’t know where you work, so I can’t comment on specifics, but I have found at other places I worked many coworkers thought “using any GPL’d software was banned” but all ran Bash on their MacOS laptops… now maybe you’re all Windows all the time and really have a ban where you work, but in my experience such bans are not quite so total as is sometimes perceived.

                                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                                    So you’re banning stupid people from using your software (stupid, because apparently they can’t read a license and estimate its effect). I’d call that a net win because it reduces customer support requests: stupid as they are, they’re probably of the “you must fix the issue I have, now, for free” kind, too.

                                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                                      FSVO “stupid people” which includes “smart people who’ve chosen to work for people who make stupid decisions”, sure. But it’s not an invalid point.

                                                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                                                        Respectfully, you’re both being a bit elitist here. There are limits on what we can conceive of based around our previous personal experiences.

                                                                                                                        I have been thorugh the process of thinking something was stupid, only to learn that no really it’s NOT stupid and there were honest to god good reasons behind this or that restriction which I just wasn’t aware of at the time.

                                                                                                                        Are they decisions you’d make? Possibly not. Are they decisions I’d make under the circumstances? Maybe and maybe not. I know I don’t have all the answers, and I’m arguably in a better position to have a wider view than some.

                                                                                                                    2. 2

                                                                                                                      One person already pointed out FAANG are known to do this. What they do doesn’t generalize to most enterprises, though. Heck, their success has a lot to do with being opposite of most enterprises. You should probably just say the specific companies, esp if it’s SaaS like Amazon.

                                                                                                                      1. 5

                                                                                                                        FAANG are known to do some of that.

                                                                                                                        I work at Google and editing GPL code (not just using, actually changing and distributing an external project, coreboot) is what they hired me for, so the GPL is certainly not “banned”. There are bans though and the list is public: https://opensource.google.com/docs/thirdparty/licenses/#banned

                                                                                                                        1. 0

                                                                                                                          No but as someone else explained in more detail, it’s walled off from the mono-repo to protect the main code base from the viral nature of the GPL.

                                                                                                                          Google has wisely chosen to put enough resources into play that it can safely play with fire safely.

                                                                                                                  2. 3

                                                                                                                    Rather than being outraged, software authors should choose licenses that will do what they want and mean, and save their energy for creating more awesome software :)

                                                                                                                    You’re missing the important case where one’s ethics does not necessarily align with what one thinks should be enforced by law. For example, you might think that cheating on your SO is wrong, but it is generally not illegal to do.

                                                                                                                    Just because I share similar goals as the FSF, does not mean I agree with their desired means to accomplish those goals.

                                                                                                                    Effectively, you’re espousing a form of “the ends justify the means.”

                                                                                                                    (You don’t need to ask me why I disagree with using copyleft as a means. Just go look up arguments against the use of intellectual property.)

                                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                                      “Support Intellectual Prosperity, Not Property!”

                                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                                        You’re missing the important case where one’s ethics does not necessarily align with what one thinks should be enforced by law. For example, you might think that cheating on your SO is wrong, but it is generally not illegal to do.

                                                                                                                        So then get involved with activism efforts to change said law to more fully align with your desires?

                                                                                                                        My point is simple - we live in a society awash with outrage, and honestly I think it’s becoming a canned response to way too much, so I’m suggesting the channeling of that energy into something more useful. That’s all.

                                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                                          All I’m saying is that your outlook on how to choose licenses is extremely short sighted. And you aren’t the only one falling into this trap. Lots of people, for example, think it’s entirely unreasonable to be upset with someone plagiarizing your work if you put it into the public domain. And you’re effectively making the same argument, and it’s ridiculous.

                                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                                            I don’t agree. You’re making analogies that don’t work, at least in my world view. I’m sure you have information or background that I don’t, but can you please help me understand how writing some code and then putting it under a license which is explicitly designed to allow it to be copied, sold or otherwise used in a particular way is equivalent to plagiarizing someone’s written work which was explicitly designed NOT to be copied etc?

                                                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                                                              Sorry, but I don’t see what you’re missing. My last comment had zero analogies. The first analogy in my initial comment (cheating on SO) was merely used to demonstrate that laws and ethics are not the same thing. That is, just because I don’t want to use the full weight of the law to force you to do something (e.g., the GPL) doesn’t mean I thinkI don’t agree with the motivation for the GPL in the first place (reduce the amount kf proprietary code).

                                                                                                                              In other words, saying you should choose a license based on its effect neglects the fact that one may disagree with the means by which the license achieves said effect.

                                                                                                                              For example, I might choose to publish my source code in the public domain. In the eyes of the law, it would be legal for anyone to do anything with that work without restriction, including plagiarizing it. If you argue that one should choose a license only by its effect, then you’d think this was completely reasonable since I chose to put it into the public domain and knew this could happen. But what I’m saying is that this is a fairly shallow way to interpret license usage, and that it would be completely reasonable for the publisher to be upset at someone plagiarizing their public domain work. Because laws and ethics are not equivalent.

                                                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                                                For example, I might choose to publish my source code in the public domain. In the eyes of the law, it would be legal for anyone to do anything with that work without restriction, including plagiarizing it. If you argue that one should choose a license only by its effect, then you’d think this was completely reasonable since I chose to put it into the public domain and knew this could happen. But what I’m saying is that this is a fairly shallow way to interpret license usage, and that it would be completely reasonable for the publisher to be upset at someone plagiarizing their public domain work. Because laws and ethics are not equivalent.

                                                                                                                                I see where you’re coming from now, and you’re right. I am a citizen of the US. In the US, putting something into the public domain says that you can do whatever the hell you want with that code. If you copy the code and claim it’s yours, then I would think that is morally bankrupt of you to do, but you wouldn’t be violating the law.

                                                                                                                                The law is what it is, and we have to live by it, or break it and face the consequences. When I have discussions with people, my assumption is that generally speaking “we will act within the boundaries of the law” goes without saying.

                                                                                                                                I guess if you think people’s outrage is just and warranted, then that’s fine. I don’t know that I agree with you, but I also suspect that we are coming at this from two very different perspectives and I’m unsure whether it makes sense to try to have a meeting of the minds in this forum.

                                                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                                                  I’m not advocating breaking the law. I’m not sure how I could be clearer unfortunately, and I don’t know why you think I’ve abdicated the assumption that one should generally act within the law. This is about choosing licenses and the reasons for doing so. i.e., It can be about the means as well as the ends.

                                                                                                                      2. 2

                                                                                                                        IMO this boils down to whether or not you think capitalism is inherently exploitative at its base or whether it can also be a force for good.

                                                                                                                        As you mention later a lot of us don’t have a choice whether or not to participate in capitalism, but it is inherently exploitative. For example, you wouldn’t be forced to choose between profit or die unless you were being exploited in the first place.

                                                                                                                        But you raise a really important point, which is that being able to avoid capitalism is a luxury and that’s something to keep in mind whenever we criticize people’s actions.

                                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                                          As you mention later a lot of us don’t have a choice whether or not to participate in capitalism, but it is inherently exploitative. For example, you wouldn’t be forced to choose between profit or die unless you were being exploited in the first place.

                                                                                                                          False dichotomy, every developed country has some form of social welfare for its citizens to fall back on should they absolutely need it. Even in the wacky old free-market capitalist utopia United States.

                                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                                            False dichotomy, every developed country has some form of social welfare for its citizens to fall back on should they absolutely need it. Even in the wacky old free-market capitalist utopia United States.

                                                                                                                            … Have you ever lived on welfare or other state supported benefit / plan? I have, albeit admittedly while I was still under my mother’s roof. I had MassHealth and she lived in survivor’s benefits and SSI to raise me.

                                                                                                                            We got by and I never starved but please don’t put living in such a state forward as a viable alternative.

                                                                                                                            For instance, with the expensive medical care I require, were I living on welfare or something like it, I might not die, but I’d likely wish for death given the hardship such a situation would impose.

                                                                                                                            It’s very easy to make arguments based on theory, but living the reality is something quite different.

                                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                                              I was responding to the grandparent’s statement that I quoted and the fact that he/she painted a false dichotomy under capitalism of “profit or die” and used social welfare systems as a counterpoint. I didn’t say every country’s social welfare systems are perfect, just that by and large, they exist and they keep a lot of people from dying.

                                                                                                                            2. 0

                                                                                                                              I’m not sure what you’re getting at, social welfare is not a capitalist construct.

                                                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                                                But lack of social welfare is not a capitalist construct either.

                                                                                                                          2. 2

                                                                                                                            “ermissive licenses were designed to allow for commercial use of the licensed work, so having expectations to the contrary seem like a recipe for disappointment to me. Rather than being outraged, software authors should choose licenses that will do what they want and mean, and save their energy for creating more awesome software :)”

                                                                                                                            That’s what I keep saying.

                                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                                            This is going to be highly annoying to a lot of people.

                                                                                                                            I can see the rationale behind no longer producing 32-bit x86 installation images for arguably obsolete hardware (which is already the case). Or scaling back the number of i386 packages supported by the distribution but removing all support for all 32-bit software is going a little too far. There are a number of programs that I have to use occasionally both at home and at work that are 32-bit and will never be 64-bit. At $work, there are some hardware management tools that cannot be replaced with anything else. I guess this means that those servers are going to stay on 18.04 for all eternity or get migrated to Debian…somehow.

                                                                                                                            I mean, at the very least they should continue to support 32-bit static binaries. Then at least someone in the community can step in and provide a PPA for some set of 32-bit libraries and programs. I hope they are not going as far as to disable i386 in the kernel, it’s not like doing so will result in any space savings or easier maintenance. All it will do is close a door to those who still need some 32-bit software in their lives. (Which is quite a lot of us.)

                                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                                              Their FAQ has notes about using LXD containers and Snaps (which bundle the required 32-bit libraries while still using the same kernel). This pretty much implies that the kernel isn’t dropping i386 support.

                                                                                                                            1. 40

                                                                                                                              It doesn’t encourage growth. A developer working in Go and only Go will help his business’s bottom line, and the shareholders will be happy, but he will always be a mediocre programmer which is why mediocre coders are so fond of Go.

                                                                                                                              Saying that someone, by deciding to use a tool over other, will be forever a mediocre coder, is just wrong at so many levels, this is disgusting.

                                                                                                                              1. 12

                                                                                                                                Exactly. Growth is not just about coming to grips with terrible programming languages, or with brilliant but complicated languages.

                                                                                                                                It comes from learning to work together with others and learning to build complicated, often interconnected, software. This has inherent complexity, both on a technical and human level.

                                                                                                                                You don’t need to use a terrible language to grow in those things.

                                                                                                                                1. 11

                                                                                                                                  I’m reminded of the cliche, it’s a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

                                                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                                                    The Law of the instrument, may be a relevant concept to bring up though, in conjunction with your noted cliche.

                                                                                                                                    “I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.”
                                                                                                                                    – Abraham Maslow

                                                                                                                                    That said, I do more strongly align with your stated cliche. I think we are lucky to have such a wide range of quality tools to pick from these days.