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    I’m going to start reading William Gibson’s “Neuromancer” novel. If I can find the time, I also want to begin reading Katsuhiro Otomo’s “Akira” manga series, published back in 1988.

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      If you make it through Neuromancer, you might want to check out his anthology Burning Chrome. Probably my favorite works of his.

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        That’s certainly the plan, going through all of Gibson’s work. Thanks for the recommendation.

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          Oh no, don’t read all his work. The gems are:

          • Burning Chrome (short story collection, 1982)
          • Sprawl trilogy
            • Neuromancer (1984)
            • Count Zero (1986)
            • Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988)
          • The Difference Engine (1990), an alternative history novel Gibson wrote with Bruce Sterling

          Personally, when I do a re-read, I stop there. If you’re still really keen, go on to:

          • Bridge trilogy
            • Virtual Light (1993)
            • Idoru (1996)
            • All Tomorrow’s Parties (1999)

          Just beware that they totally lack the lyrical writing that people find so gripping in the Sprawl trilogy. All of his works after 2000 take place in the very-near-future or the present and have straightforward stories and themes. I don’t find them compelling whatsoever and they generally get mixed reviews (in contrast with the universal acclaim of his earlier work).

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            That makes depressing sense - cyberpunk dystopia is no longer fiction, nor is it in the future. Though I haven’t read his work so that’s easy for me to say.

            Thank you for the recommendations, it’s good to know where to start!

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              Thank you. I’m gonna do what you suggest, and will dive into his other stuff in case I feel curious.

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                I agree with your summary but I’d like to add that I really enjoyed one of his modern books as well: ‘Pattern Recognition’

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                  Heh. Horses for courses I suppose! It’s been a while since I read them now but I remember liking the bridge trilogy (though not as much as the sprawl ones) but I hated Difference Engine and found it a dreary slog that I struggled to get through.

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              great choices, Akira is epic. I want to finish reading Snowcrash at some point!

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                I am amazed you could put Snowcrash down.

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                SUCH a good set of books!

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                  Thank you. I’m really excited by Gibson’s. Considering the fact it was the first time the term “cyberspace” was used.

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                  Neuromancer is amazing. Enjoy :-)

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                    Great! I’m even more excited about it.

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                    I am so jealous you have not read Gibson yet.

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                      I know that feeling to experience great things for the first time. It’s certainly a grateful experience.

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                    Debating I started after realising that I sometimes struggled to articulate myself as well as I’d like to during meetings at work, and I thought debating might help me to simultaneously think (i.e. formulate arguments) and speak (i.e. articulate them clearly). It turned out that I love debating; not only does it help train your public speaking skills but since we debate motions about a wide variety of topics, it’s great simply getting a more nuanced view of things that happen in the world. Also, the people are great.

                    Sustainability I spend time reading about, pontificating about, or acting around sustainability. I’m particularly interested in environmental sustainability but also in any system that is ‘unsustainable’ too. I feel a responsibility to try and contribute positively to these kinds of problems (plus it’s fun, if approached with a non-cynical mindset). I try hard to live a holistically sustainable life, not just environmentally, but also socially and politically.

                    Keeping healthy Keeping fit and healthy is a really high priority for me, I usually exercise three times a week, and pick between circuit training, bouldering, running, stretching and strength training. Eating well is also really important to me. I’m not sure if these class as hobbies because I’m not really willing to compromise on them if life gets busy in other areas (so they’re more like essentials), but I do enjoy them :)

                    Reading My favourite genre is fantasy; I love the feeling of becoming immersed in the ‘world’ of a story. Having said that, I’m currently trying to branch out a little, particularly to read books that will give me a different perspective somehow (e.g. classics or books written from an interesting point of view). I’m currently reading The Kite Runner. Book recommendations are welcome :)

                    Gratitude journal Every night, I wrote down things I’m grateful for in a journal. When I first heard about gratitude journals I thought they sounded pretty lame. However, I think it’s really useful to acknowledge that generally, I live in a great time and am incredibly lucky compared to many. Spending ~5 minutes to actively recognise the things that I have in life (as opposed to what I don’t have, i.e. the consumerist view) definitely makes me a happier and more contented person.

                    [Not a hobby] Work I work as a software engineer, and really enjoy it. I don’t think of work as a hobby because I recognise that there’s a contract between myself and my employer, but, a happy side effect of that contract is that I derive enjoyment from a job well done and getting to collaborate with great colleagues.

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                      I share a lot of these (except debating!). I just heard about gratitude journals, and my brother has started writing one. I’m really interested to see how it works out for him. It does seem to make a lot of sense!

                      Exercise is so important for my mental state. I play badminton, and for the 2 or so months of the year when it winds down, I can really feel myself getting more stressed and anxious.

                      And living sustainably, and continually searching for more ways to do so gives my life meaning. I feel like it’s my biggest responsibility, and there are still so many ways to improve. What I love about it is that many of the changes I’ve made have not been about giving up on convenience. In many ways my life is more simple, and it makes more sense. I feel like I’m regaining control over my life!

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                        Debating sounds interesting! How do you practice that? Are there clubs or similar?

                        (I know debating is a quasi-academic activity in the US and maybe other Anglo-Saxon milieus but it’s almost unknown in Sweden outside people who are semi-pro politicians).

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                          I do British Parliamentary Debating (BP) at a local club. I just googled ‘debate club [my city]’ and found a great club :)

                          We debate all kinds of things, motions I can remember include “This house regrets the rise of satire in politics”, “This house, as the government, would subsidise bank loans for poor people” and “This house, as the Chinese government, would give up all terratorial claims to the nine dash line”.

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                            Not exactly debating, but you can hone some related skills by doing Improv theatre, and to my understanding you can find lots of meetups and clubs everywhere.

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                            Got any good book recommendations? I started reading more fantasy recently and am always on the lookout for new stuff.

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                              For Fantasy: Malazan Book of the Fallen series is very good Also I quite liked Joe Abercrombie’s The First Law Trilogy

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                                I love Brandon Sanderson; I’d recommend any of his series really :)

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                              Trying to finish an update for my regular expression game, since people have been mentioning that it’s too easy.

                              Already got rid of 1000 (out of 1900) lines of code over the last few days.

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                                Your project homepage link gives me a 403 from the github README.

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                                  ^^ Well, I am still working on it. I’m going to set the homepage up as soon as I have a more or less stable version I can properly document.

                                  Until then, the old README might help.

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                                you had a problem with the output format of du, so you rewrote the whole thing in a different language and your version is 4x slower

                                free software exists for the exact reason that people can improve upon it and change the bits they don’t like

                                don’t get me wrong, i like the final product, it looks very nice and human friendly

                                it just feels like you wrote it in rust for the sake of it, instead of trying to achieve a better design or fix some flaw deeply rooted in the fundamental design of the existing implementation

                                by doing so you threw away all the work that others made available for free, and ended up with something with sub-par efficiency

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                                  I did write it rust for the sake of it. I like working in rust I dislike working in c.

                                  I also contributed several fixes to the rust port of du in coreutils. The rust port of du is also a lot slower than the original c du. I do not know why. This is something I want to look in to without starting a c vs rust speed flamewar.

                                  I guess to me du and dust are different tools and adding the dust features to du wouldn’t be accepted (the point of dust is to remove the need for - h flag and to autosort for you).

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                                    du is part of POSIX. coreutils, which includes du, would not accept output format change.

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                                      Not to mention that large, mature projects, like coreutils, are not super easy to augment with functionality like what dust provides, not to mention the social challenges of actually contributing a change to such a project.

                                      The whole assumption of @izabera’s comment, that people need to not write whatever software they want and instead only contribute to existing projects, is incredibly stuck up its own ass.

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                                        I don’t think that’s what izabera is saying. What is argued is that it is better to contribute to du than to write dust. It is like saying helping the poor is better than enjoying the beach; that does not mean people shouldn’t enjoy the beach.

                                        When you hear such things, replying that people can do whatever they want, while true, is unproductive. My reply is more akin to pointing out why donating to certain charity will not actually end up helping the poor.

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                                          When you hear such things, replying that people can do whatever they want, while true, is unproductive.

                                          izabera’s comment in the first place is unproductive. I had some asshole say the same thing to me in the past. They can bugger off. Free software very clearly does not exist just for the sake of small iterative improvement. There are many reasons and benefits of free software, and picking a single one and lambasting folks for it is… Well… @nebkor got it right: stuck up its own ass.

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                                            Yeah… I disagree with lambasting, but I still think it is a fair game to discuss strategic aspect. Say, if your goal is to help users, is it better to contribute to existing popular C implementation, or to start Rust one? As bootandy already said that the goal was to write Rust, and since that goal can’t be fulfilled by contributing to C implementation, it is a moot. But if the goal was to help users, it would be relevant.

                                            As another example, the goal of Mozilla is much closer to “help users” than to “write Rust”. So the strategic aspect of what is the best way to achieve that goal, whether it is to work on existing C++ codebase or to rewrite it in Rust, is a very real question. For another, if someone’s goal is to, say, improve the security of world’s computational infrastructure, it is a very real question whether it is best to improve C++ or to work on Rust. And if and only if two people agree on the goal, it is legitimate to argue by one to the other that “you are wasting your time with Rust”. (I believe this is roughly why Daniel Micay is now working on Copperhead OS instead of Rust. I tend to agree that if one’s goal is to improve security, Rust is currently not the best bet. I work on Rust because my goal is not to improve security.)

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                                    Question:

                                    What about it is more “intuitive”? Programmers tend to use that term a lot and assume that it will be clear what they mean. I use du sometimes but not often. It’s not clear to be what about Dust is more intuitive. When you have time, I’d suggest updating that first paragraph to explain more fully rather than hoping folks understand what you mean by “intuitive”.

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                                      Great point. @bootandy is the author of the tool, and was gracious enough to accept some of my PRs for it a little while back (my laptop is named “djin”, if you look closely at the readme).

                                      I’m posting this here because it’s the point of jumping off for what follows; I’ll probably add it to an issue or PR or something, but really, Andy’s the author and has the best ideas about what it’s for. But as someone who happens to use du and other tools like it frequently, I was instantly hooked on dust (ha!).

                                      1. I use du and friends when I notice, for some reason (hopefully because my eye caught a number that was not yet too small), that a partition is not as empty as I thought it should be, or something like that; maybe I’m really just curious. But the fundamental mystery to be solved is, “What is eating all my disk?”

                                      2. du has a number of ways of showing you what it finds, in terms of disk consumption, but really, there are only one or two ways you invoke it: with -h for “human readable” units, like 100G or 89k, or with -b for “bytes”. The former is used for a quick survey of a directory with a small number of things in it, and the latter for when you have a bunch and need to sort the output numerically, and you’re obligated to either further pass it into something like awk to turn bytes into the appropriate human-friendly unit like mega or gigabytes, or you just do some rough math in your head and use the ordering to sanity check. Then once you have the top offenders, you recurse down into the largest one and repeat the process until you’ve found your cruft or gems and can move on.

                                      3. dust assumes that’s what you wanted to do in the first place, and takes care of tracking the largest offenders in terms of actual size, and showing them to you with human-friendly units and in-context within the filetree. Huzzah!

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                                        For what it’s worth, sort has a mode for sorting “human” numbers with the SI-ish suffixes: -h or --human-numeric-sort. Not to say the other reasons for dust aren’t good ones!

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                                          I’ve been doing this kind of thing for more than twenty years, and I’m still learning things like this :)

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                                          Those are awesoe reasons for using dust. I think something like that should be front and center. It would certainly get my attention as a only occassional user of du.

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                                          I think @nebkor answers it very well.

                                          Intuitive is a subjective thing. But here are the reasons I made the tool :

                                          1. I don’t want to remember that -h is for human readable output.
                                          2. I don’t want to have to sort and head things. (you need to remember to use -h with sort too)
                                          3. Once I have found a big directory I usually want to look inside it straight away to see why it is so big.

                                          I’ll add some more text to the reader.

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                                          Fixing up my sql tutorial so it worked better on mobile and adding a few more questions. http://www.windowfunctions.com/