1. 4

    Every Python problem the author describes in the article as needing to be solved by with Docker or Kubernetes has been possible without them since long before they were even first released [1]. I think the author also misunderstands the difference between languages that support concurrency well and languages that support distributed systems well, and misses their own point that you should pick languages based on their strengths. The programming model in PHP has seen a resurgence in distributed systems as “serverless”, where stateless applications are used to respond to individual requests (making scaling and state management much easier).

    I think the problem Docker solves is very different from the authors assumption that it’s used to “make the transition to the modern world of cloud computing”. There’s a lot of utility in being able to package and install applications the same way regardless of language. In the various places I’ve worked, it’s been just as useful as a way to deploy Golang and Java applications as it has Python - I’ve found Java applications often come with a mountain of shell scripts intended to discover and configure system state that can be thrown out when using Docker.

    [1]:

    1. 2

      I found the nix explanations in the article really interesting - seeing an example that goes all the way from writing an application to having it deployed and running on a server is really useful. I didn’t know about nixops before and it seems to fill in the gap between packaging and deployment I’ve seen when looking at other nix articles.

      The correct solution would be to talk to the developers and have them implement support, but in the meantime, how should we proceed?

      This line (and a few others) really stood out to me though - I think the author has followed the common misunderstanding that “DevOps” is a type of technology, rather than the culture of operations and development engineers participating together. The process the author hints at looks exactly like a classic engineering team where development writes an application and it gets passed over a wall to the operations team who deploy it.

      1. 2

        That particular section was inspired by an experience I had where there was exactly this kind of split. In my case the development team never got around to prioritising the fix we needed, so we worked around it.

        I completely agree that DevOps is a culture, not a job title, but that unfortunately wasn’t the case where I used to work.

      1. 9

        Was there any reason to write this in the soon-to-be EOL Python 2 over Python 3?

        1. 3

          I’d like to keep compatibility with 3, but I wrote & tested it against 2 because on my system & most others that’s still the default version (and probably will continue to be long after the language maintainers stop support). Forcing the version to 3 would require a bunch of complexity that didn’t make sense in a 1-file 700-line tool.

          1. 4

            You can set the shebang to explicitly call python3.

            1. 3

              If I did that, then all the systems that don’t have python3 at all would be broken.

              The appropriate solution is what I’ve done: set the shebang to python & write code that ought to work on any version a user might reasonably have. And, if I start to have more users I’ll test on python3 more often.

              1. 8

                Okay, I suppose. It just seems the likelihood of a Python user who wants to use this, yet lacks Python 3 on their computer, and installing Python 3 with <package manager> install python3 is nil or approaching nil. People love to support Python 2 but it’s officially EOL in like, 6 months. Sorry if I sound condescending, I’m not trying to. It’s just the one place I’ve not found Python 3 is CentOS 6

                1. 2

                  If halcy drops python2 support for mastodon.py I’ll have to drop python2 support for this. In the meantime, since nothing on my dev machine uses python3, I’m not going to go out of my way to drop compatibility.

                2. 1

                  I don’t think setting the shebang to python is the right decision. Regardless of whether you’re targeting python2 or python3 (and I do agree that programmers should avoid creating new code in python2 now that we are so close to its end-of-life), it’s not consistent from system to system whether the python binary refers to version 2 or 3. I use both arch linux and ubuntu frequently, and on arch python is Python 3 but on Ubuntu it’s Python 2, so I’ve just gotten used to calling python3 or python2 explicitly (and sometimes even python3.6 specifically if I know I need that version of python 3 and not another one). Being as explicit as possible about what version of a dependency you want, and relying as little as possible on what happens to be installed under a given name on some platform, is a good practice.

                  1. 1

                    The thing is, while it’s not totally consistent across systems which version which python is set to, on those same systems, it’s not consistent whether or not python2 or python3 even exist. You can have a system where python=python2 and python 3 is installed as Python3.6 only (or it’s installed but not in the path). Distro maintainers have done all sorts of crazy stuff with how they’ve juggled multiple major versions of python being installed at once.

                    Since a lot of folks don’t have python 3 installed at all, and since part of the point of a curses client is to support systems that really don’t have the horsepower to run the web client, I don’t want to drop python2 support. (For instance, I’ve got a mac mini at home manufactured right after the switch to intel, and it’s been years since it was able to install OS updates or load most websites in its browser, & this ought to work fine on that machine.)

                3. 1

                  maybe he means the complexity of installing python3 when you’ve python2 by default

                  1. 2

                    I mean the complexity of detecting python2, determining whether or not python3 exists, determining its path, and executing $0 with it before executing any other code – in other words, what’s necessary to support cases where python=python2 but python3=python3, cases where python=python3, and cases where python=python2 and python3 isn’t in path but various python3.x or Python3 or Python3.x exist in path.

                    This is a stupid complicated task (I’ve seen it done for Perl & tcl+wish, and done it for shells where sh may be dash or busybox), and it takes a dozen lines to do correctly.

                    I have no need for a dependency on any python3 features, so compatibility makes more sense.

                    1. 6

                      python should always equal python2, at least on systems that comply with PEP394

                      https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0394/

                      1. 2

                        I didn’t know this existed! Cool! :)

                4. 1

                  I understand your simplicity arguments, but honestly the fact that it’s python 2 makes me want to ignore it.

                  1. 2

                    It’s not ‘python 2’ but ‘python 2 / 3’. I’m not dropping compatibility with python3 – just trying to avoid dropping compatibility with the version of python that people actually use.

                    For a small project like this, the main effort involved in supporting both is in switching which interpreter you’re running it with & making sure the dependencies are in both versions of site-packages.

                    Specifically, I haven’t been heavily testing on python 3 because changes to how strings work between 2 and 3 cause my pickled cache files not to work across major versions – in other words, in order to test on python 3, I need to move my cache out of the way to avoid corrupting it. Since this has been my primary client for 6 months, I’m not particularly happy doing that, & I’m happier just taking compatibility patches from folks like @gcupc who run it on python3.

                    1. 2

                      then ignore it

                      1. 1

                        I don’t - understand this reaction. I get wanting to support the wholesale move to Python 3, and I totally get that 3 has lots of improved language syntax and features, but if you might find a tool useful, why reject it over something like this?

                        I mean, I regularly use tools written in Perl because they Just Work even though the idea of dusting off those particular neurons makes me kinda queasy just thinking about it :)

                        1. 1

                          The impression I’m getting (from the many, many people telling me to break compatibility) is that, because the move to 3 was held back so long by incompatible 2.x code that never got ported, folks see 2.x-compatible code as traitorous / counterrevolutionary, and because 3.x has new features that encourage a different coding style, they figure any 3.x-specific code would be written in a fundamentally different way than 2.x-compatible code (and thus, 2.x-compatibility is seen as an awkward and burdensome hack).

                          Of course, the former applies much more than the latter to this code: I made it 2.7-compatible because that’s the default on my system, and because I’m not particularly invested in the progress of the python platform – I don’t care one way or another about the glorious python3 revolution, because I consider python a middling language whose primary utility is its large standard library & online help/documentation system – I don’t feel like I need to help the platform along by encouraging people to upgrade. I’ve got little interest in being pythonic or adhering to the community’s preferred idioms except when doing so makes the code smaller or more readable, but to the extent that I have any kind of python mentality affecting the style and structure of the code, it’s probably even pre-2.7 (since I learned on 2.4).

                          Anyway, this thing is BSD licensed – and TINY. If anybody is invested enough in breaking 2.7-compatibility, feel free to fork it. I’d be interested in seeing the kinds of structural changes that folks think would come out of a pure-3.x implementation, since I don’t really consider it amenable to most of the features that have been added. (In a 3.x-only port, in a couple places, forced casts could be dropped, and a couple lines of unicode handling could be eliminated, and I’ve got some polyfills for simulating library features introduced or removed in 3.x, but aside from that, the only change I could see is maybe a heavier use of functional-style list operations?)

                          1. 2

                            What you’re seeing here is the result of a lot of work people in the community are doing to motivate people to switch. There was and is a fair bit of anxiety over watching what happens when other programming languages (like Perl 5) stagnate and even when the successor arrives only a tiny group of ascetics actually use it because most of the user base has gone elsewhere.

                            So Guido and pretty much the entire community have undertaken a bunch of initiatives to force people to move. Things like stopping security updates, and having library authors drop Python 2 support with newer versions.

                            I’m honestly in favor of all of that - I quite like Python 3 and think it’s a very positive step forward for the community.

                            I’m less a fan of negative or judgemental pressure tactics however (Not suggesting those were in use here) and think that the incentives should be positive in getting people to move over.

                            1. 1

                              Makes sense. In this particular case, positive incentives aren’t going to convince me to drop support because the client is basically feature-complete & I’m not convinced that switching to new features is going to substantially lower maintenance load. The stuff that’s easier in python3 than on python2 (like unicode) is already written & stable.

                              I’ll break compatibility if my (single) dependency does, or if somebody does a fork that is convincingly preferable to my version. (Or, I guess, if one of my major planned features – like fully-featured killfiles that can inject CWs based on filters, or multi-account support with a merged timeline – can be done in 1/10th of the number of lines with a python3 feature.)

                              1. 1

                                Obviously it’s your bat and ball, but if you really want people to feel welcome to fork, you should make it its own repository, that way they can fork and also pull your upstream changes as you evolve the script.

                                Just a thought :)

                                1. 3

                                  It’s in its own repository now. (That’s what triggered me to post it: a couple folks asked me to stick it in its own repo so they could submit pull requests easier.)

                  1. 1

                    Configuration management tooling.

                    1. 2

                      I use the very vague metric “I am proud of the work I do?”

                      For me, this expands to:

                      • Are the users of my software happy with the work I’ve done for them?
                      • Do I think I could have done my work better than I did, given the same constraints?
                      • Has my software caused pain for the people who use it, operate it, or maintain it?
                      • Am I happy to show or talk about my work to other people?
                      1. 7

                        It wasn’t the central point of the article, but I found it very hard to let this quote pass:

                        Go modules took the idea of dependency management and rethought it from first principles, then landed on a much more elegant solution that I think other programming languages will spend the next few years catching up with.

                        Go has certainly started from scratch in it’s design of dependency management tooling, but - at least to me - feels very far behind other languages both new and old. It makes some of the painful parts of other systems much easier, especially in it’s attempts to minimise the impacts of updating dependencies, but makes a lot of things much harder that are already elegantly solved by other package managers (swapping implementations of dependencies or getting them from other sources, showing outdated packages, separating source code from distribution, providing an interface for other tooling to be built on top of the dependency manager, and so on).

                          1. 14

                            INI does not support hierarchies.

                            1. 10

                              INI files have no well-defined spec, and very few parser implementations work the same way.

                            1. 19

                              Urbit’s innovations have stood in the dark shadow of moldbug’s neofeudalist writings. Every time Urbit comes up in conversations among crypto people here in Berlin, someone in the group says “but have you looked at what Curtis wants the world to look like?” and then the subject changes.

                              I think it’s good for the project that people can say “yeah but he’s gone now, what do you think about the ___ mechanism?” since there are some interesting ideas to examine in there. They built everything from scratch. A VM, a language, a filesystem, etc etc etc…

                              But still, this is kind of like if Terry had stepped away from TempleOS.

                              1. 7

                                The whole concept as I understand it seems pretty interesting, but come on - the entire ecosystem of Urbit is still absurd. Hoon, the weird new pronunciation scheme you have to learn, the obtuse naming schemes…

                                1. 3

                                  I found the weird names annoying as well, but Curtis does come up with a valid reason for this, in that everything gets rewritten and refactored multiple times, so “…it lets the hard problem of naming get solved later, and hence better.” As the system gets more mature, and actually usable, it would be nice if they came up with some meaningful names for the bigger components (e.g. rename Ford to Build System). He also admits his biggest mistake was assigning 1 to false and 0 to true. I’m sure this was a result of his habitual contrariness.

                                  1. 4

                                    I’m sure this was a result of his habitual contrariness.

                                    Or perhaps cognitive contamination from /bin/sh.

                                2. 10

                                  Every time Urbit comes up in conversations among crypto people here in Berlin, someone in the group says “but have you looked at what Curtis wants the world to look like?” and then the subject changes.

                                  And I find this quite baffling. It’s deeply disappointing that people whom I respect default to this gossip-driven analysis instead, that a project as ambitious and worthy as Urbit gets buried in “foogate” style rumors.

                                  Urbit is fascinating. It is the only project I know of designed to address distributed problems (viz. community moderation, censorship, identity, ownership) from an incentive-based approach instead of the typical GNU-style “sheer will and religion” approach.

                                  1. 34

                                    Since Curtis apparently wants the world to be in a certain manner and more or less spun up his own world in Urbit, maybe it’s prudent to consider what Curtis’ opinions on things are before adopting the project that likely embodies them?

                                    I’m not sure myself, but in a project like this, it may be hard to meaningfully separate creator and creation - even after the creator left (as the fundamental architecture is still shaped in his image).

                                    1. 5

                                      I think the new primer https://urbit.org/primer/ makes a good case that there is nothing actually feudal about Urbit in practical terms. Once you own a planet, the personal level of Urbit entity, you are free to have its traffic routed by any star, the network routing level, that will accept you. This could be a problem it Facebook or some government buys up every star in the system, which is unlikely for the foreseeable future.

                                      1. 6

                                        Once you own a planet

                                        Of which there will be - by design (“Any reputation system needs scarcity of identity.”) - fewer than there are people on this planet right now (4 billion in total). Given how these systems work, it will be interesting to reclaim “lost” ones, reducing supply even further over time.

                                        Will everybody else be a sharecropper? Or will they have to spin up their own network?

                                        Now these identities can be subpartitioned (“moons”, again 2^32, and they’re bound to their “planet”), but if global network size doesn’t matter, why setup such limits in the first place? This isn’t the 1970’s anymore (as they correctly state in their marketing material).

                                        This could be a problem it Facebook or some government buys up every star in the system

                                        They merely need to control the galaxies: “The galaxies form a senate which updates the logic of the Ethereum land registry by majority vote”. The platform doesn’t seem to design elections for this “senate” into the platform.

                                        “Tlon remains the guardian of the urbit.org galaxies. We have always wanted the address space to be widely distributed.” - address space, yes. But Tlon owns the right to repartition the entire platform as they “bought back” galaxies. Even if you “own” a planet, that’s only one of Tlon’s decisions away from not being yours anymore.

                                        Since control over your data is bound to a planet, which is contingent of (at some point) a galaxy “sponsoring” you, and they can make up all the rules, it looks like just the same kind of sharecropping to me as any of the big vendor-lock platforms that make up the modern internet. Just with more obscure ownership.

                                        1. 5

                                          and they can make up all the rules

                                          This is just dishonest. The “rules” are voted on by a senate, the same way the rules of the internet are voted on by the IEEE currently.

                                          Tlon owns the right to repartition the entire platform as they “bought back” galaxies. Even if you “own” a planet, that’s only one of Tlon’s decisions away from not being yours anymore.

                                          False. Owning Urbit addresses is like owning a bitcoin wallet. Tlon can’t take it away from you any more than Satoshi can.

                                          (edit:)

                                          if global network size doesn’t matter, why setup such limits in the first place?

                                          Global network size does matter, as you quoted, “Any reputation system needs scarcity of identity.” It seems to me like you are giving Urbit a bad-faith reading. If you try a good-faith reading, try the “principle of charity”, you might find that you agree with Urbit more than you realize.

                                          1. 3

                                            The “rules” are voted on by a senate

                                            Who or what makes up the senate? I quoted the part of their marketing material already and to me it looks like absolute rule by whoever controls a majority of galaxy nodes, so 129 hosts. The rules they vote on make up the “land registry”, from which, apparently, everything else is derived.

                                            “Any reputation system needs scarcity of identity”

                                            Yes, I quoted that.

                                            But how is a reputation system relevant to what you can or cannot do to your append-only data log? I prefer scuttlebutts solution to approximately the same problem: you keep your log, I keep my log, and if I decide to trust you, I also look at your log (and parse the bits you decide to share with me by giving me the keys).

                                            No need for reputation except the reputation that already exists in the real world, that makes me decide whether to trust you.

                                            [edit to add: the Urbit folks claim elsewhere that galaxies and stars are entirely meaningless, but since they’ve been made part of the fabric that makes up the platform, by having them spawn each other and planets, they can’t be that meaningless. Otherwise, why add them in the first place?]

                                            1. 3

                                              Who or what makes up the senate?

                                              Galaxy owners. See the bottom of https://urbit.org/primer for the distribution. I don’t think anyone really knows exactly how this will work yet, the owners are pretty well distributed with nobody owning 51% of the address space.

                                              But how is a reputation system relevant to what you can or cannot do to your append-only data log?

                                              It’s not. A reputation system is relevant to how valuable my Urbit is. If I start spamming people with my planet, then the star that is my supervisor can stop sending me packets. I could move to another star, but if my reputation gets bad enough, nobody will want to send/receive my packets, and my Urbit will become worthless, I wouldn’t even be able to resell it. This is not the case with e.g. email addresses, which spammers can create ad infinitum. That is the only reason for the scarcity of addresses.

                                              Re: the append log, only I can write to that, no different than scuttlebutt.

                                              Also, nobody claimed galaxies and stars are meaningless; they are network infrastructure responsible for routing packets. They are arbitrary in that a planet doesn’t really care which star it’s getting packets from, just like you don’t care which AWS data center is serving you a website.

                                    2. 18

                                      Paraphrasing a comment I made about Jordan Peterson’s work - learning Urbit and the weird way it is structured is a significant time investment. A simple heuristic to determine whether something is worth your time is to check what the creator of this thing is like.

                                      In the case of JP, my impression is unfortunately only 3rd hand.

                                      In the case of Jarvin, or rather his alter ego Mencius Moldbug, I have read some primary material, such as the following blog post:

                                      https://www.unqualified-reservations.org/2013/01/how-bitcoin-dies/

                                      Imagine that the BTC/USD market is perfectly liquid with no exchange overhead. Imagine also that there are two types of BTC users: Jews, who speculate (holding BTC long-term with the expectation that it will appreciate against USD); and Aryans, who only trade (and sweep all BTC balances into USD at the end of every day). These are simplifications, of course—but edifying ones.

                                      Jarvin was (in my imperfect recollection) criticized for the use of these terms, and (again, iirc) replied that he was only being “provocative”. Fair enough, I’m sure Jarvin (and people of his ilk) have plenty of experience in discussing whether what they’re writing is only provocative or if they’re genuinely anti-Semitic (Jarvin identifies as a Jew, I believe). It’s a depressingly common occurrence online.

                                      But from a step outside, looking at something to invest time and effort in, and seeing that a project is closely identified with a person I would never want to be associated with, it’s quite easy to choose not to delve too much further.

                                      I also happen to believe that he (along with many cryptocurrency enthusiasts) are fundamentally mistaken about how economics work, and I discount Urbit for that reason too.

                                      1. 1

                                        In the case of Peterson, his work is philosophical, so that heuristic makes a large amount of sense. Although when dealing with someone so, uh, misrepresented by various groups, I’d think it would be more sensible to actually look at the (readily, freely available) source material.

                                        I agree that it is a significant time investment to fully understand, but I think you can get a good approximation of his basic mindset by watching one of his non-combative interviews, or one or two of his (non-biblical) lectures .

                                        1. 1

                                          Thanks for the suggestions!

                                          I was a bit unclear when I wrote:

                                          In the case of JP, my impression is unfortunately only 3rd hand.

                                          I meant it in the narrow sense that I cannot offer any first-hand critique of his work. I’m really hesitant to parrot statements like “Person X holds Y views” unless I’ve verified this personally.

                                          (I’d love to post a link to my comment but it’s really hard to find on the site, I’ll try to update if I can find it)

                                          However, there’s a limit of how much time I’m prepared to spend just to be able to defend or criticize someone. In JP’s case, my desire to engage with his work is minimal since his most well-known public stance is vociferously anti-trans.

                                          1. 1

                                            In JP’s case, my desire to engage with his work is minimal since his most well-known public stance is vociferously anti-trans.

                                            This is a good example of why it is worth going to the source. Peterson is not anti-trans, which he has stated many times and demonstrated by having respectful, productive interviews with at least one trans person that I can think of (Theryn Meyer).

                                            The popular narrative conflates his objection to compelled speech in general with his objection to trans people (who were the subject of a particular piece of compelled speech legislation).

                                            1. 2

                                              I was prodded by your comment to read up a bit more about the entire Canadian controversy that I referred to.

                                              You’re correct, based on the reporting I’ve read JP can’t be denoted as anti-trans. Thanks for encouraging me to learn more about this issue.

                                              1. 2

                                                Thanks for being open to revisiting your views; that’s a remarkably rare virtue.

                                        2. -1

                                          if they’re genuinely anti-Semitic (Jarvin identifies as a Jew, I believe) … are fundamentally mistaken about how economics work, and I discount Urbit for that reason too.

                                          What? You seem confused. Urbit is a technological structure, not a political one or economic one.

                                          1. 15

                                            Urbit is a technological structure, not a political one or economic one.

                                            The entire premise of Urbit is the ownership of “scarce resources” (analogous to physical land) where one can seek rent. That’s both economic and political.

                                            1. 4

                                              Ok, but that’s no different from DNS.

                                              Also:

                                              Urbit’s distribution and sponsorship hierarchy of galaxies, stars and planets is not designed as a political structure, or even a social structure. The actual social layer is in userspace – one layer up.

                                              Socially and politically, Urbit is a flat network of planets. Galaxies and stars are plumbing. No one cares which star is your sponsor, any more than your Facebook friends care who your ISP is, or you care what data center Facebook is in.

                                              1. 5

                                                Ok, but that’s no different from DNS.

                                                DNS is absolutely a politic, economic and technical structure.

                                                1. 3

                                                  You’re misunderstanding structures and the downstream implications that these structures cause. DNS is a techincal structure that has implications which are technical, political, and economic.

                                                  The US Congress is a political structure which has implications that are political and economic (and sometimes technical, in the case of, say, regulating Facebook data privacy or whatever).

                                                  1. 6

                                                    DNS isn’t just a technical structure. The distinction between structures and implications (which I don’t think is useful in this context anyway) does to economics, but DNS does make political/social choices - for example, the number of root servers, control being hierarchical rather than distributed, and so on. All of these are both technical and political choices that the project makes, and that’s after generously excluding the organisations, committees, and documents that make DNS work.

                                                    Urbit’s choice to have “scarce resources” is an intentionally different political choice from the one DNS made, which never intended to hit the resource limits we currently have with IPv4 - which is why we now have IPv6, and an address space where addresses becoming scarce is almost entirely implausible for the foreseeable future. Urbit’s choice was made with full knowledge of how scarcity effects these systems, making it absolutely clear that the design decision is political, not technical.

                                            2. 7

                                              Is there an example of a technology that doesn’t have political or economic implications? Considering the potential scope and impact of Urbit beyond its technological contributions seems especially important since it seems to me that it’s trying to alter the current conventional paradigm for internet services.

                                              1. 3

                                                Is there an example of a technology that doesn’t have political or economic implications?

                                                No. And I didn’t say it doesn’t have political/economic implications, in fact it definitely does. But in my opinion, the Urbit political implications are better than what we currently have. Consider:

                                                Socially and politically, Urbit is a flat network of planets. Galaxies and stars are plumbing. No one cares which star is your sponsor, any more than your Facebook friends care who your ISP is, or you care what data center Facebook is in. … Because sponsorship has an escape mechanism, it is not a feudal bond (like your relationship to Facebook).

                                                Urbit is a decentralized network of social networks. No one can regulate it. Urbit is made to blossom into an endless garden of human cultures, each of which must regulate itself, none of which can bother the others. The soil in which these flowers grow must be level and neutral.

                                          2. 7

                                            I agree. It’s a kind of politics that makes people weak centered on our basic instincts of us vs them. The better route is to separate the two, ignore whatever bullshit he writes on his blog, focus on his technology, identify what good/bad can come out of it, and (if good) then either adopt or clone plus compete with it. The adopt or clone decision is where you consider the person. Even then, it’s not their political ramblings so much as what they do in a development and business context day to day. A person with strange beliefs who acts civil and hard working around others in a business is fine with me.

                                            Edit to add: Work in diverse company with piles of people each with different beliefs, some diametrically opposed. We somehow still function and mostly get along with each other. Different mindset with effort put in is all it takes. Makes job more interesting, too.

                                            1. 4

                                              Except Urbit is deeply rooted, in its design, by Jarvin’s beliefs about politics and economics. A technology can’t stand in isolation from its context when its a deeply social technology like Urbit.

                                              1. 5

                                                That’s a statement of faith, not proof. Assuming no patent risk, I can literally take his tech, distill out ideas useful to me, and use it for those things. I could’ve done that without ever knowing what his political beliefs are. I can do it while knowing what his political beliefs are. I can even do it to support things he opposes. Therefore, they provably don’t matter if I’m not partnering with him.

                                                They matter to you or others like you who feel a need to combine a person’s political beliefs or statements with everything they do. You’re limiting yourself voluntarily for ideological reasons. I intentionally avoided limiting myself that way since it reduces what I can get done with no value in return. My opponents who control the world in damaging ways also don’t limit themselves like you: they’ll work with or fund people whose beliefs or personalities they can’t stand if it achieves common goals. Got them where they are. Defeating them to stop real damage (vs crap people write on Internet) will take all kinds of people working together despite differing beliefs.

                                                1. 5

                                                  Oh don’t get me wrong, I’m all for appropriate parts of technology for uses outside their design. My statement wasn’t about restricting yourself. What I mean is that (and this is especially true in software) the design of a technology is better understood when looking at the “whys” and not just the “hows”. For example, why does Urbit limit its address space? It’s not a technological limitation. In fact, there are lots of parts of the system built around the idea of artificial resource scarcity. Without understanding this system “top”, which covers many lines of code in various components, how are you going to properly take what you need if say, you don’t want that silly limitation?

                                                  A person with strange beliefs who acts civil and hard working around others in a business is fine with me.

                                                  I find that a person with “strange beliefs” (to put it nicely) is also a strange person to work with. Most work is communist in nature ( in the Graeber definition of “from each according to their ability, to each according to their need”). When you ask for a code review, your colleague typically doesn’t say “I will do it but what will you do for me?”. If you need a wrench, the guy next to you doesn’t go “Only if you give me $1”. If the friction is low enough, or need great enough, people will typically do it. Any strange beliefs that stray away from this kind of work ethic typically make all work far less efficient, and even unworkable.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    In fact, there are lots of parts of the system built around the idea of artificial resource scarcity.

                                                    Ok, now I agree with you there. What you’re talking about, though, is design goals. I’m all for understanding them since I need to understand the rationale behind the decisions. I think I avoided Urbit when I saw cryptocurrencies or something mentioned. The rationales might have a political component. I can still ignore that if I choose. Sometimes, I learn from it like with privacy techs whose features might be inspired by sneaky behavior of companies or governments. One can still separate design requirements from political motivations in most cases just by filtering and/or generalizing.

                                                    “is also a strange person to work with. “

                                                    Now, now, that’s jumping to conclusions. A person should be judged on what they actually do rather than hypothesizing. I only read a little on this guy with some people saying he’s really nice at conferences with informative talks. Some people said there were problems but those posts weren’t as specific. If he’s actually disrupting people, then he’s not a good guy to have around. If he’s not and is helpful, then he is potentially a good guy to have around. That’s how I do it with coworkers. It works with some being weird on occasion but they usually just avoid uncomfortable subjects if they know it bothers someone. Unless they’re assholes which is a different thing entirely. ;)

                                                    “When you ask for”

                                                    Since I know little about him, I’d say whoever you’re describing is a person that demands something in return for his work. Presumably, the employees aren’t working for free. They’re doing that, too. I’m also aware of, experienced a lot of, people trying to be users getting others to do their work for them or get something from nothing. They’re not give and take people so much as take, take, take. One strategy for dealing with that is to be a no, extra, free work by default person who is selective about their generosity. I just read an awesome article about such a transition recently.

                                                    Now, that said, a person that acts like that can also be a drain on a business or not right for its culture. Not even political culture so much as performance standards. If they’re paid to do an app, the best team will always be supporting each other to get it out the door in whatever state the business needs. I’d not hire such a person that made everything a trade if they were already getting paid for an outcome that required that minor thing to achieve. I’d rather them be helpful by default covering for each others’ weaknesses and helping them improve on them. I’m sure you’re of the same mind on that, too. :)

                                                    1. 6

                                                      “is also a strange person to work with. “

                                                      Now, now, that’s jumping to conclusions.

                                                      Re-reading what I wrote I was definitely a little obtuse. Let me elaborate, I find people with his kind of ideas usually hard to work with. But that’s just my experience. I didn’t mean strange ideas in general, but “strange ideas” as in, his ideas. Reading previous articles, it seems his co-workers basically seemed to have done what you would do, basically tiptoe around those issues to maintain a polite atmosphere. Which is fine and probably the most appropriate thing to do in that situation.

                                                      However, I think we can agree that we should not entertain asinine ideas. If he was a flat earther and designed his software to have a 2D address space because the plane is the way to go, we would certainly find that a strange design choice that introduces complexity. But for some reason when someone thinks some races are a better fit for slavery and that democracy is bad and incorporates those ideas into his design by having an ownership model based on those ideas, we seem to say “I can work with that guy, he is fine, he likes cats as I do”. To me, that’s just a form of support and validation. Maybe you are able to compartmentalize these things, but what if the person can’t and finds your support validation of the other stuff. I’m going to call in Godwin’s Law here and say, yes, Hitler also loved his mother and painted some nice stuff, but would I work with him on chemistry projects?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        If he was a flat earther and designed his software to have a 2D address space because the plane is the way to go, we would certainly find that a strange design choice that introduces complexity.

                                                        I don’t know about you, but I would judge the idea as strange if I would not see the benefits of it, not because its author has different political views. If 2d addresses would solve many issues than it might be a good idea regardless of who came up with it.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          “But for some reason when someone thinks some races are a better fit for slavery and that democracy is bad “

                                                          Those are actually specific examples where I’d consider not working with someone. Especially if the project was about individual empowerment and decentralization. I’ve still worked with people who had a white supremacist background. We’d occasionally have to call them out on their behavior if a discussion between them and black folks involved race. They’d make an advance which we sane, white people would block. They almost always walk off. Then, it’s done. They and the black folks usually get along day-to-day with one we just fired being missed a lot. Might shock you with the stuff you read on tech forums about what blacks, Jews, etc believe and need for inclusive environments, eh?

                                                          “To me, that’s just a form of support and validation. Maybe you are able to compartmentalize these things, but what if the person can’t and finds your support validation of the other stuff.”

                                                          Which brings me to this. Down here in the South, we know there’s lots of racists on each side. As we might say it, we know everyone has a bit of bullshit or crazy shit in their head. With a Christian majority, we’re also taught that people are inherently sinful with us needing to admonish it, be forgiving, and be patient in helping them get better. So, what of these people who think other races are inferior and individual decisions are worthless? How to get them further away from these beliefs?

                                                          There’s only one thing that works that I can tell from observing where the South was and is today. That’s getting different people in one place forced to be around each other, tolerating each other, for long periods of time. For us, it starts in public schools where racist whites and blacks along with people in the middle are stuck together. Then in the workplaces. The process over time lowered that racist bullshit down to tolerable levels where the KKK-style people are fairly uncommon or rare depending on the area. They mostly hide from us. Even they often like black people where they are compartmentalizing what they learned to like vs what they were taught to hate.

                                                          What you’re advocating is essentially enlightened people pushing out those who still need to learn stuff away from those who will teach them. Then, they cluster into groups of racists who continue reading garbage, hating on people, plotting, and planning. Many such shunned groups ended up voting for Trump last election since he was only one pretending to care about them. There was no way to reach them since the radical-leftist liberals succeeded in censoring them off as many forums as possible. They similarly created their own recruiting locals and drowning out opposition. Division and siloing at an all-time high on the net like it used to be in meat space in the South. (slow clap for radical liberals)

                                                          We’re not showing support for these idiots: we’re showing them that people are better than they think. We’ll call them out where needed. If they disrupt too much and ignore warnings, we’ll eject them from that position so they know we mean business. They’ll have another chance to do better. Contrast that to radical-liberal doctrine behind CoC’s where statements on any medium or place will get people blocked from all places with similar CoC. See paragraph above for where that shit leads. My reaction is more patient and measured with a chance for people to learn over time. And it always takes time.

                                                          1. 3

                                                            That’s getting different people in one place forced to be around each other, tolerating each other, for long periods of time.

                                                            I think this is absolutely right. I’m not advocating for people to splinter of and shun each other. What I’m advocating is people should not ignore bad ideas and make sure the other party knows. I’m not a moral relativist. And you are right about Trump folks feeling left out. You are also right that the liberals basically ignored them.

                                                            However, You are wrong that radical-leftists are liberals because they are not liberals. Radical leftists despise liberals just as much as the right does. But you won’t find that kind of discussion on Fox News or NY Times.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              I forgot about the definition dispute. My bad. Yeah, OK, your position seems a lot more reasonable. I like that. :)

                                                            2. 1

                                                              I’m a lot less patient and tolerant than I used to be: particularly of stupid stuff directed at someone else.

                                                        2. 1

                                                          The reason for network address scarcity is to make spamming cost-ineffective.

                                                          Compare that with the state of email spam, where email addresses are basically free.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            Alternatively, they could do something like bank-level verification checking government ID’s and requiring a deposit to create an account. Then, maybe fining whoever is spamming. Then, it should go down. Worst case with low or now fines, whoever is compromised will find out about that changing their credentials or reinstalling their system.

                                                            Jumping from “there’s spam cuz addresses are free” to “need network address scarcity” is the kind of unnecessary, risky solution that crowd is fond of. Better to just fix the problems in existing systems or design new ones with methods proven in existing ones. They have an irrational aversion to doing that for some reason.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Relying on government ids is a centralized solution. Urbit is decentralized, thus needs a decentralized reputation system.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                It could be bootstrapped that way. The different organizations become part of the reputation system. Hell, it might even become a new service from banks and credit unions. They already often act as notaries.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Yeah, I’d rather not have banks regulating my computer usage…

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    Are you using burst transmission or a mesh network not connected to the Internet (doubtful)? Otherwise, you already use a centralized service via one of the big ISP’s that ID’d you and took payment with centralized currency. They also regulate your computer usage far as the network goes. Although they got issues, they’re still less volatile than most of these decentralized systems. The most popular ones, esp Bittorrent, operate over the centralized ones, too, for their benefits. That’s despite decentralized options being available for a long time. They’re too slow and unreliable.

                                                                    It always interests me that you rely on centralized services on one hand with justifications but tell me in other areas there can be no justification for relying on centralized service. Make up your mind. Meanwhile, the inconsistency suggests to me that we can leverage centralized services as a component in these decentralization schemes.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      Decentralized computing infrastructure is something valuable we should work toward. We’re not there yet, but Urbit is a step in the right direction. Ofc sometimes its better to centralize some things, but in computing I’d rather have decentralized infra.

                                                            2. 0

                                                              Spamming is not the main motivation. The main motivation is to provide a source of funding to the company by selling the space. Oh, and the designer was a neo-feudalist which probably inspired the whole enterprise.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                The main motivation is to provide a source of funding to the company by selling the space.

                                                                I’ll add that I’m skeptical of all companies that look like pyramid schemes or at least just funnels of money to the creators in exchange for tech that’s highly risky. Throw in any cryptocurrencies to that list since they’re usually structured in an elitist way for founders. If it’s a money system, I want it done fairly by non-profits or public-benefit companies whose incentives will protect the currency, exchange, and so on. Preferably one that’s already profitable from another revenue stream where they don’t have to worry about trying to monetize the financial project. It can just breakeven with a slight surplus or donations to cover expansion.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  You are right on the money here.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    Great pun haha.

                                                    2. 7

                                                      Lol no one owes moldbug respect

                                                    3. 5

                                                      Whatever his political stance he’s still as excellent a writer as he was one the old Usenet. One of the more memorable flames on talk.bizarre was from his hand.

                                                      1. 11

                                                        I found him self-aggrandizing and subject to an inescapable superiority complex. When he writes philosophy he is unnecessarily verbose, so everything said seems tainted by trivial matters such as the author ego and it leaves me wondering whether the actual ideas expressed are self-sufficient or tainted by this ego: trying to project, to present himself: keeping at the marketing speak level and building an idea of himself, instead of leaving his ideas laid bare.

                                                        It’s not precise, and he just reads like an insufferable prick. I found Urbit rather interesting though, but I can only rejoice that the project is now without this guy.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          I tried reading the linked post and couldn’t make heads or tails of it. Maybe because it’s written “in-universe” so to speak and therefore addresses those people familiar with the specialized terminology of the Urbit system.

                                                      1. 6

                                                        I was learning SQL over the summer, and I found the venn diagrams very confusing. Unlike /u/pab, I think the visualization from this article explains it much better.

                                                        1. 8

                                                          Referencing users on lobste.rs is done with @, not /u/, e.g. @Forty-Bot.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            hm, well profile pages are still at lobste.rs/u/<username> so I don’t know why they changed it.

                                                            1. 6

                                                              What do you mean changed it? @ is the de facto standard way to mention usernames. It has always been that way on lobste.rs and everywhere else I can think of, the only place /u/ works is reddit.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                @ originated on Twitter & has been widely copied but I suppose that Reddit is actually now more widely used than Twitter.

                                                                1. 5

                                                                  @username format predates Twitter.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    @name was around before Twitter (as plaintext markers in emails), and @name references are common on many social media sites (including Facebook).

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      What’s a plaintext marker in email? Never heard of it.

                                                                      Some MUAs with html email allowing you to embed simple text or something?

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        I mean literally including @Name in the text of an email when sending a message to a group of people and including parts directed at specific people. Not specially parsed by software at all.

                                                                      2. 1

                                                                        Facebook copied it from Twitter, as I said.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          My point is that @name is in far, far more common usage than /u/name. I should have been clearer.

                                                                      3. 3

                                                                        I suppose that Reddit is actually now more widely used than Twitter.

                                                                        Citation most definitely needed.

                                                                        Maybe in raw “engagement numbers” or whatever weird metrics ad people use to track site sizes, but Twitter is more mainstream than Reddit. A lot of Redditisms don’t even make sense to people outside it: the /r/ and /u/ prefixes, the distinction between link and self posts, and the threading (believe it or not, most people find threading super-confusing).

                                                                        The gosh-darn POTUS has a Twitter account. I doubt he’s even heard of Reddit.

                                                                        And in any case, it’s not whether /u/username or @username is more “popular”, the plain fact of the matter is that this site uses @username, and nothing else. As does Twitter, Discord, MS Teams, and for all I know Slack. Reddit is the outlier in this case.

                                                                        And finally, there’s no reddit,com/u/username page, it redirects to reddit.com/user/username.

                                                                        (Edit removed over-use of the word “definitely”).

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          You are correct on all counts. I was even mistaken about my belief that Reddit is more popular than Twitter; evidently that’s only true in the US: https://www.alexa.com/topsites/countries/US

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I appreciate your response.

                                                                          2. 1

                                                                            And finally, there’s no reddit,com/u/username page, it redirects to reddit.com/user/username.

                                                                            Writing /u/username in on reddit does several things. First, it sends a notification to that user. Second, it is displayed as if it was written [/u/username](https://reddit.com/user/username). There is similar behaviour for referencing subreddits with /r/subreddit. This native support strongly suggests that reddit considers reddit.com/u/username as a valid way to refer to a user’s profile, and to mention them on the website.

                                                                          3. 2

                                                                            But lobsters is written in ruby like Twitter and Reddit is python.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              I’m pretty sure there’s an implied sarcasm identifier that’s not printed there.

                                                                              At least I really hope there is.

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                                                                    The counter argument would be Moxie of course:

                                                                    One of the controversial things we did with Signal early on was to build it as an unfederated service. Nothing about any of the protocols we’ve developed requires centralization; it’s entirely possible to build a federated Signal Protocol-based messenger, but I no longer believe that it is possible to build a competitive federated messenger at all.

                                                                    So the big challenge will come when users expect some new feature which ActivityPub currently does not provide.

                                                                    1. 15

                                                                      Mastodon and the ActivityPub community have been iterating and pumping out new features on a rapid basis. On a protocol levle, ActivityPub itself is an iteration on the Activity Streams and ActivityPump protocols; themselves an iteration on OStatus. And there are plenty of ActivityPub instances that weren’t initially envisioned: PeerTube, MediaGoblin, NextCloud, … and chess?

                                                                      I suppose moxie would argue that Mastodon isn’t or won’t be competitive.

                                                                      I argue Signal, just like Twitter, will run out of money.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        Signal will become what WhatsApp was meant to become. WhatsApp could have been a secure messaging layer for businesses and consumers but Facebook made them an offer they couldn’t refuse so that dream wasn’t realized.

                                                                        Signal now has a foundation and they have one of the original founders of WhatsApp bankrolling the operation. I don’t think they will run out of money and might even realize the original WhatsApp dream.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Want to longbet?

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Sure.

                                                                      2. 10

                                                                        That quote is not really a good counter argument, it basically reads like “federation is bad because I said so.” You have to read the rest of his post to tease out his arguments:

                                                                        • federation makes it difficult to make changes
                                                                        • federation still favors a service single provider (e.g. gmail and email)

                                                                        (Note: I don’t agree with moxie, just posting his counter argument for others to read)

                                                                        1. 8

                                                                          The counter argument would be Moxie of course

                                                                          I’d have a lot easier time taking his arguments seriously if he hadn’t threatened legal action against a free software project simply for trying to build an interoperable client.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            Mastodon seems to cope quite well with this, possibly because there are few implementations and upgrading the server application isn’t too hard.

                                                                            But I think the counter argument is entirely correct - it’s not possible (or at least very hard) to build a competitive federated messenger - and that’s completely fine. Competition is one of the parts of the centralised model that leads to de-prioritising users needs so that platforms can be monetise to keep it alive and “competitive”.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              Wait, what about matrix though?

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                To clarify my opinion a bit - I’m suggesting that federated networks won’t succeed by the metrics used to measure if something is “competitive”, not that federated networks don’t work. I think Mastodon and Matrix are both really good projects that will be much better than the alternatives long term, since there won’t be many incentives not to prioritise the needs of their users.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  Matrix from what I heard has scaling issues; we’re talking “three people on a single server massively increases load” bad. I think it’s due to protocol flaws?

                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                    Any of matrix’s scaling issues come from federation (trying to sync room state across many different homeserver instances) and the poor state resolution algorithm they were using up until this past summer. Three (or thousands) of users on a single server participating in a room is not a concern, as that is a centralized instance.

                                                                                    Highly recommend following the matrix blog and TWIM for project updates, especially for anything about synapse (their reference homeserver implementation). It was recently updated to python 3 and the memory footprint has drastically reduced. Keep a lookout for the “next generation” homeserver implementation, Dendrite, sometime after the Matrix 1.0 spec releases.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      I remember reading that this was because the current reference server implementation is simply not optimized. They’re rewriting it in Go (IIRC the new server is called Dendrite), but we’ll have to wait and see how performance changes.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                npm does locally cache packages these days so they only need to be downloaded once, but you might be more interested in looking at the next generation package management tools the npm team is currently working on.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  With an inaccurate resolution or system used to synchronise time we’d see much higher differences between time on systems, which could easily lead to differences bigger than the few minutes other systems are willing to tolerate.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    I get the impression this isn’t quite ready - sounds like something I’d find very useful, but not much in the way of screenshots or documentation.

                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                      The repository has been made public few hours ago… It’s not a release per se, and for now the project has still some way to go.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        I’m looking forward to seeing it’s future :)

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                                                                                          There is more info in their website https://grafana.com/loki

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Deleted my original rant response because, as @sgreben rightfully pointed out, my rant was exactly the kind of thing i ranted about.

                                                                                      But, yes, I’d like to see a freeze in new users for a while, to avoid lobste.rs from collapsing under its own weight.

                                                                                      I’d also suggest:

                                                                                      1. Culling users who have been new members for X months and never posted (but once you post/comment once, you’re in for forever?)
                                                                                      2. Requiring more than one invitation for joining?
                                                                                      3. Moving to a subscription model. I get enough enjoyment out of this site that I’d be happy to pay for it.

                                                                                      But, that’s just my USD$0.02.

                                                                                      1. 15

                                                                                        Culling users who have been new members for X months and never posted (but once you post/comment once, you’re in for forever?)

                                                                                        I will note that there are people who primarily lurk in any online community. This site has a private message system and possibly other features of value to members who never post publicly.

                                                                                        Original research I was privy to in my first moderating position suggested that about 20 percent of users were active participants who posted regularly or semi regularly, another 10 percent posted only once or very rarely and the rest lurked. Anecdotal observation suggests that these figures probably are fairly representative of other communities I have engaged in.

                                                                                        1. 8

                                                                                          Lurkers are harmful to communities like this, because they have influence in shaping the site but also don’t bother to engage beyond being a silent majority that can be pandered to (purposefully or not) they amplify any democratic issues the site might have.

                                                                                          Better to purge them and leave control of the site (what little there is) in the hands of the people who bother participating.

                                                                                          Edit: lurkers here being those who have accounts but don’t post.

                                                                                          1. 7

                                                                                            Hi friendlysock, I’m malxau and I’m a lurker.

                                                                                            The reason I ended up like this is because the technology landscape is very broad today (and getting broader), and I have firsthand knowledge or experience with a tiny fraction of topics that get discussed. So the best way I can see to keep the signal-to-noise ratio high is to read about things that I don’t know, including comments from people more familiar with them, and avoid contributing to or moderating those posts.

                                                                                            Occasionally there will be something I know, but something I deeply know and have firsthand knowledge of is still rather rare. (In my case, I’ve spent the last 14 years working in Windows kernel mode; I’m an active practitioner, but looking at submissions you’ll see why I don’t feel like I know the breadth of topics being discussed, including things like the Palantir thread.)

                                                                                            Do you still think I’m a problem? Do you think the site would work better if I commented or moderated more?

                                                                                            1. 4

                                                                                              I can’t see your upvotes or flags, so I can’t comment on that front. That said, I think the site would definitely be improved by your participation and submissions of things relating to your background with Windows arcane programming!

                                                                                              Thank you for giving your perspective here.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                Your site was refreshingly different since it covered stuff I don’t usually see on Lobsters. Doing low-level kernel stuff, I bet you ran into both content and lessons learned that Lobsters might have found interesting regardless of you writing on Windows. There’s also Lobsters on Windows. There’s also a lot of Lobsters that hate Windows.

                                                                                                I have no idea how well your stuff would’ve been received. There’s a chance people might have found it interesting, though. If it’s Windows-like as someone said, an easy example is Minoca OS getting lots of appreciation. Another thread on its documentation had 10 votes. So, there’s potential.

                                                                                              2. 6

                                                                                                Hey there. That seems like a fairly strong opinion. Any research or data you can point me to? I’m not aware of evidence that lurkers are somehow harmful in most cases.

                                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                                  Have you seen HN or Reddit? I’m serious. It’s called hivemind for a reason.

                                                                                                  People that care enough about a site to post content, or even comment, are, by definition, more involved in the site than users who maintain accounts but don’t do anything but vote up and down.

                                                                                                  Lurkers who just vote and flag look an awful lot like slacktivists. They’re freeloaders, contributing no content of their own and no discussion, but they can still screw up conversations by voting with a knee-jerk reaction.

                                                                                                  One of the things that sets Lobsters apart is that is made up quite largely of people that actually write code frequently (instead of, say, being growth hackers, or bloggers, or marketers, or bankers, or whatever else) and that those people are given transparency and tools for interacting with the running of the community. Lurkers run counter to at least the latter of those key characteristics.

                                                                                                  1. 11

                                                                                                    Yes, I’ve seen both HN and Reddit.

                                                                                                    I don’t think I’ve ever seen a forum that didn’t have a lot of lurkers. Do you know of any forums where “post or leave” is actual policy? Do you know of any research on this angle?

                                                                                                    I’m not making any recommendations here. I’m just seeing people saying “I think we should do X!” and the things I’m seeing don’t fit with my understanding of best practices. But I certainly don’t know everything, so I’m trying to share what I know concerning actual (pertinent) data and asking if anyone knows of any supporting research for their positions.

                                                                                                    To be clear, I’m absolutely not trying to tell anyone how lobsters should be run. I was given an invitation by a coder who wants to start a discussion board and he asked if I would consider taking on the role of lead moderator. I tentatively agreed.

                                                                                                    So I’m not actually a programmer, though I have some technical training and so on. I’m genuinely interested in learning if there is good data and research supporting the various proposals in this discussion because I’m looking for, among other things, stuff pertinent to the project I’m trying to collaborate on.

                                                                                                    I’m genuinely curious and open to seeing good information on such things. I’m aware these questions may be unwelcome here, both because I’m new and because people will tend to interpret my comments as intent to shape policy on lobsters the very day I joined.

                                                                                                    A best case outcome is that my comments and questions serve to be helpful and thought provoking for people here who are trying to shape lobsters while I get useful resources to support my project. But a less nice and more likely outcome is that people decide my questions are somehow bad behavior and I get told to gtfo of the discussion or something.

                                                                                                    1. 7

                                                                                                      I’ve never thought about how lurkers skew voting until this thread, but it seems commonsensical now. You end up with the posters performing for a silent audience, instead of interacting with each other.

                                                                                                      Maybe a half-measure we could try is giving people a pool of votes that’s replenished when you post, and you spend from that pool when you up or down a story or comment; one post (submission or comment) could earn you 10 votes or something. That way votes come from the people who are actually engaging with the site, but we’re not kicking anyone off for not being chatty.

                                                                                                      1. 10

                                                                                                        Maybe a half-measure we could try is giving people a pool of votes that’s replenished when you post

                                                                                                        No no no no no no no. That would result in users creating a large number of low-effort comments in order to refuel. It’s bad enough that internet users will do almost anything to make a number go up. It’s even worse when you attach actual incentives to that number.

                                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                                          We could do something like requiring a comment/post have at least +3 or something before it counts towards your vote pool; that might be enough to frustrate a lot of the system-gaming, no?

                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                            The low-effort posts on popular topics get lots of votes. Probably won’t work.

                                                                                                        2. 2

                                                                                                          I’ve never thought about how lurkers skew voting until this thread, but it seems commonsensical now. You end up with the posters performing for a silent audience, instead of interacting with each other.

                                                                                                          This is an empirical question worth empirically validating before believing. There is also a plausible just-so story that older users feel more confident voting strategically to enforce their political opinions, etc. Form your hypothesis, write a query, decide how to interpret possible results, and then send it to me to run.

                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                            That’s a neat idea and I’d be in favor of trying it. I don’t know to what extent that would affect the upvote/downvote dynamics of the site, but I’m interested in finding out, and I don’t think it’s an onerous requirement on people.

                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                              a pool of votes that’s replenished when you post, and you spend from that pool when you up or down a story or comment; one post (submission or comment) could earn you 10 votes or something.

                                                                                                              I think that this is great idea. Personally I would go with 1-2 votes per submission but whatever the number I think we should try it.

                                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                                Yeah; I originally said 10 because voting serves a real purpose, and I’d worry that only getting one vote per comment could reduce the quality of the front page, because people would hoard their precious votes. I’m no expert on this stuff, though.

                                                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                                                This idea sounds great. I’m not sure what the dynamics would look like, but it’s be interested in trying it out.

                                                                                                              3. 6

                                                                                                                but they can still screw up conversations by voting with a knee-jerk reaction

                                                                                                                Yes, voting does screw up conversations. If I had my way, lobsters wouldn’t have votes on comments, exactly because I don’t think that meaningful conversations should be democratized like that. Lobsters isn’t a very good system for conversations in my very humble opinion (I keep linking to Discourse.org as the model to live up to for a reason). But I don’t think lurkers are necessarily any worse at knee-jerk voting than active commenters.

                                                                                                                Lobsters is, however, pretty much the gold standard for link aggregation, for surfacing content from elsewhere. Voting, flagging, and submitting articles without ever commenting is something I think we should be encouraging, because that’s what the Lobsters software is actually good at. Less conversations, more stories.

                                                                                                            2. 5

                                                                                                              voting satisfies the “me too” impulse. absent that, I suspect you’d see a lot more actual me too comments.

                                                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                                                If you change the rules to ‘post or get out!’, I suspect you will see:

                                                                                                                1. People who are slow to integrate into the community but will eventually post good stuff lose their connection to lobsters and go elsewhere instead of slowly ramping up from just looking to joining to voting to commenting/submitting.
                                                                                                                2. Lots of comments along the lines of “I have nothing to say right now, I’m just trying to say something so I don’t get purged”
                                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                                  Voting lurkers could indeed be problematic. Perhaps adding a min-karma-threshold for upvoting (similar to flagging), could be a useful experiment.

                                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                                    Is the problem with vote lurking the up or down votes?

                                                                                                                  2. 3

                                                                                                                    Downvotes are inaccessible until a user reaches a certain karma threshold. Would it make sense to do the same thing for upvotes too, reducing the pool of users that can vote?

                                                                                                                    I don’t think outright purging users is very helpful, since reading for a while before posting is a common practice (and probably not something that should be discoraged). I agree having a silent voting majority is potentially quite harmful to a forum.

                                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                                      reading for a while before posting is a common practice (and probably not something that should be discoraged)

                                                                                                                      You don’t need an account to read.

                                                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                                                        You don’t, but there are features that are useful for people who are only reading (tag filtering, hiding stories).

                                                                                                                      2. 1

                                                                                                                        That inversion is worth thinking on more. The political folks currently do more upvoting of political stuff than submissions or comments. It isn’t limited to them. We see the same thing in the technical threads for some people or types of comments.

                                                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                                                          I was under the impression votes were anonymous, is this not correct?

                                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                                            The site won’t tell other users what your votes are, but it needs to know, both to prevent multiple votes and to show you what you’ve voted on. Obviously the site administrators, who have direct database access, can query that information.

                                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                                              This is accurate, and I’ve written elsewhere in this thread about that access and the practices around it.

                                                                                                                            2. 1

                                                                                                                              They usually vote and comment together. So, you know who some of the likely voters are.

                                                                                                                        2. 2

                                                                                                                          how about limiting the votes one has? dota2 does that for reports to keep the reporting system valuable. one of:

                                                                                                                          • fixed number of votes per time-unit (easiest, but limited impact i think)
                                                                                                                          • votes per time-unit limited by karma, eg. votes * karma / maxKarma (could become a lobsters ingame currency)
                                                                                                                          • votes per time-unit limited by submission count (facilitates spamming)
                                                                                                                          • votes per time-unit limited by combined submission count and karma (i don’t have an idea for a good function to do that ;)

                                                                                                                          this should at least limit the lurker influence. i for one wouldn’t care if i’d have to manage my votes a bit.

                                                                                                                          edit: haldean had posted this idea before me, i should have read this thread more thoroughly :)

                                                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                                                            If the intent is to limit the effect of upvotes, and avoid knee-jerk voting, one could also make it mirror the current downvote choices and simply make a user think about why they are up-voting a comment. So an upvote arrow should offer choices such as [technical|meta|..].

                                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                                              Or “MAS” for “mutual appreciation society” ;)

                                                                                                                          2. 2

                                                                                                                            Wouldn’t that just cause stupid posts like “not lurker” or “first” to trigger account “lock in” – possibly even on very old threads.

                                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                                              My concern with a negative eye towards people like myself who don’t post much is that it suggests posting is mandatory regardless of quality or relevance. I am a lurker, but only because I don’t want to clutter up threads with poorly informed or nontechnical content. I wish I had the depth of experience that some more frequent posters have; should I be excluded for being more of a generalist?

                                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                                          I really like the way this looks, though it took me a couple attempts to realize that the pairs dots on A-R aren’t important. It’d be very cool to use these for decorating a spellbook - I’ll be trying to remember this when I next create one.

                                                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                                                            Thanks! The font is designed so it can be easily sight-read at the table if necessary. All of the capitals are double dotted and the lowercase are single dotted just to indicate the center of each letter (and for show). You’re free to edit the source to take them out, though ;)

                                                                                                                            The font should still be unambiguously readable if characters share horizontal strokes, but I was having trouble getting Metafont to shift the baseline of each character so they would overlap. Not the greatest documentation :-(

                                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                                              Oh, that makes a lot of sense! I don’t think they look bad at all though, I just assumed they carried information and changed between letters when I first tried to understand how the letters. I missed them representing upper and lowercase in the examples below, which on a second look definitely helps trying to read them.

                                                                                                                          1. 6

                                                                                                                            Can we please stop using the “Make X Y Again” schema for advertising things? I know there is no ill intent behind this but some of us are directly affected by the policies and rhetoric that comes out of the very much sincere desire to roll back progressivism by decades.

                                                                                                                            1. 12

                                                                                                                              Your comment is off-topic.

                                                                                                                              You reasonably observe that the name of the project is derivative, acknowledge that the author bears you no ill intent, but nevertheless suggest the project name is harming you and yours.

                                                                                                                              You don’t address the author, you don’t talk about Medium as a platform, you don’t talk about blogging or anything apparently connected to the article. Your comment is a generic complaint. (Applies to any submission matching your pattern.)

                                                                                                                              We’re a community of practitioners. We show (create, invest, fix), rather than tell (scold, beg, demand).

                                                                                                                              1. 26

                                                                                                                                The title of this project is a riff on a political slogan that itself is a riff on various fascist slogans throughout history. Making a joke of it by using it as the name of a browser extension is, at the very least, in poor taste. The commenter you responded to made a polite request to the community to stop doing this thing that is in poor taste. There was no need for them to address the substance of the project because the comment was only concerned with the choice of title. In terms of scolding/begging/demanding, I see more of that in your comment than in the one you responded to.

                                                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                                                  Apologies for the off-topicness, but are Mel Brooks’ Hitler jokes/comedy in bad taste? Can something horrible be alleviated by ridiculing it?

                                                                                                                                  This is a philosophical question that doesn’t wven account for the author’s intent with the naming.

                                                                                                                                  And on the other side, would “Medium we can believe in” or “Medium we can” be more acceptable or less, and to whom?

                                                                                                                                  A rose by any other name… It seems to be a somewhat useful browser addition regardless.

                                                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                                                    Can something horrible be alleviated by ridiculing it?

                                                                                                                                    Yes, somewhat, and only if actually done well. (And even then, sometimes the supposed object of ridicule can miss the point entirely and embrace whatever the “joke” was about.)

                                                                                                                                    I guess the point is, naming entirely unrelated things with the same pattern (“Make X Y again” here) is not comedy! It’s literally just spreading the slogan.

                                                                                                                                2. 19

                                                                                                                                  You can’t ignore politics when they are no longer ignoring you. However much you may think that Lobsters is a domain of pure, unadulterated reason and everything unreasonable is offtopic, the linked software decided to make a political slogan ontopic.

                                                                                                                                  You’re grandstanding here about how neutral Lobsters is, but there’s no neutrality on this moving train, and telling people to shut up about the politics that affects them isn’t nice.

                                                                                                                                  1. 9

                                                                                                                                    We’re a community of practitioners. We show (create, invest, fix), rather than tell (scold, beg, demand).

                                                                                                                                    I like this a lot! The internet would be a better place if there were more places that followed this philosophy.

                                                                                                                                    1. 0

                                                                                                                                      Yeah, wouldn’t that be something…

                                                                                                                                      :-/

                                                                                                                                    2. 8

                                                                                                                                      I also happen to feel playful takes on MAGA is putting googly eyes on swastika, and was about to post similar comment. Didn’t post as the earlier exchanges OT exchanges like this on Lobsters suggest ethics is a taboo subjects to many here.

                                                                                                                                      But seriously, screw this.

                                                                                                                                      1. -6

                                                                                                                                        Fine, let’s discuss ethics.

                                                                                                                                        Calling a playful riff on the MAGA slogan”putting googly eyes on a swastika” is bullshit. It’s the same authoritarian communist rhetorical technique that the East German government used when they called the Berlin Wall the “anti fascist defense wall”. I’m not a huge fan of Trump myself, but I’m even less of a fan of the anti-Trumpist faction in American politics characterizing Trump’s policies as literally Nazi-like so they can feel justified in weaponizing the social norm that “Nazis=bad” in western society against their poltiical enemies.

                                                                                                                                        Nothing the Trump administration is doing is in any meaningful way close to the bad things that the Nazis did - frankly most of what he’s been doing are the same things that every post-WWII American presidential administration has done, just with less high class verbiage to describe it. The people who claim otherwise are doing so in order to make themselves feel like they’re morally-righteous crusaders instead of people having ordinary political disagreements in the American political system.

                                                                                                                                        Lobsters isn’t a political discussion forum, but if people are going to say that nonpolitical articles that happen to reference the current US President’s campaign slogan should be considered forbidden, you’re already bringing politics into the space, and you shouldn’t expect that your particular poltics must go unchallenged. There’s nothing wrong with the title of the article, and people claiming otherwise are making a backhanded political argument that Trump is Bad on a technical forum.

                                                                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                                                                          Now this is an off-topic comment.

                                                                                                                                          1. 10

                                                                                                                                            And yet despite being in good company, it is the only one flagged to death, because it comes from the perspective of the wrong tribe.

                                                                                                                                            You see why I object to politics and “ethics” discussions? This is sort of the reason why–people don’t get a fair shake.

                                                                                                                                            1. 0

                                                                                                                                              This is a tough problem to solve, for sure.

                                                                                                                                              I am among those who have flagged it as off-topic, as per @alynpost ’s comment here

                                                                                                                                              https://lobste.rs/s/f4t0y2/make_medium_readable_again#c_ty2pp6

                                                                                                                                              (based on my understanding, posted here: https://lobste.rs/s/f4t0y2/make_medium_readable_again#c_szkkme)

                                                                                                                                              As both this downvote and the one I made on the other post were made in affect, I have removed them both.

                                                                                                                                              1. -1

                                                                                                                                                This whole discussion is a response to unnecessarily politicised title. Ironically, it’s the objection to the title was attacked by no ethics pls crowd.

                                                                                                                                            2. 2

                                                                                                                                              I’m not taking the bait. Would just remark that my reply, and your rant could be precisely avoided if the author stuck to fucking technicals for technical write up.

                                                                                                                                          2. 6

                                                                                                                                            How does one show, create, invest or fix in response to a negative pattern like the “Make X Y Again” headline?

                                                                                                                                            1. 4

                                                                                                                                              Indeed. I suppose one could suggest an alternate name for the project, in which case I will propose “Readable Medium” as a straightforward name for a browser extension that would entirely avoid any political connotations that only serve to distract from the substance of the project.

                                                                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                                                                I like that also because I find it humorous – a medium is a person who may do a “reading”, so “readable medium” sounds backward to me.

                                                                                                                                              2. 0

                                                                                                                                                If the title of the project bothers you, open an issue and try to convince the author of your point. If not possible, fork it.

                                                                                                                                              3. 3

                                                                                                                                                I downvoted this comment as “incorrect” but I have since reconsidered and removed my downvote.

                                                                                                                                                I initially read the comment to mean “never discuss anything political, (as defined by us the community*) on this site”.

                                                                                                                                                I know hope it reads “please feel free to discuss things political, but the focus should be on the technical contents of the submitted post”.

                                                                                                                                                In this spirit, I will submit a comment that both reflects my opinion on the linked content, and will serve as a template for an acceptable comment that also addresses the political/ethical implications.

                                                                                                                                                [start comment]

                                                                                                                                                This project strikes me as useful for now, but ultimately reactive. It’s easy for Medium to redesign their site to defeat the circumvention, and the developer and users will engage in a game of whack-a-mole to keep up.

                                                                                                                                                It’s a similar situation with ad blockers, with the significant difference that the market for ad-free browsing is much larger than the market for reading Medium without a bunch of banners.

                                                                                                                                                This segues nicely into the problems with Medium’s business plan. Ultimately, it’s just Wordpress.com with a nicer editor and draconian rules about CSS. There’s really no reason to pay for Medium apart from the content, and the content, for me personally, seems mostly to be cryptocurrency boosters nowadays. Essentially it’s content as a commodity… there has to be a critical mass of writers who are only available on Medium for it to be worth paying for.

                                                                                                                                                If Medium promised a cleaner reading experience as part of a paid tier, that would maybe help?

                                                                                                                                                As to the name of the linked project - it’s unfortunately hard to detect irony on the web, and considering the “alt-right” has had some success in shifting the conversation by “pretending” to be racist, saying it’s for the “lulz”, I am prepared to automatically assume that someone who seems to do the same is either on the same side as this political faction, or insensitive to how they appear by choosing this name.

                                                                                                                                                Personally I would add the name choice as a negative in evaluating this project.

                                                                                                                                                [end comment]

                                                                                                                                                If anyone upvotes or downvotes this comment, please let me know if it was because of the content, or the presentation, or the meta-narrative on how to handle political/ethical/sensitive submissions to the site.


                                                                                                                                                * who represents this community is another question that deserves discussion but that’s for another time.

                                                                                                                                                1. 0

                                                                                                                                                  Good comment, upvoted. You address the content of the article first, make good points and analysis, and close with minor but reasonable speculation and an opinion–and you don’t go on a screed.

                                                                                                                                                2. 2

                                                                                                                                                  @gerikson, @jamesmacaulay, @JordiGH, @varjag I’ll reply to all of you at once in the interest of my time.

                                                                                                                                                  I have had folk observe that I’m prone to understatement. I may have done that here describing the project name as derivative, when I could have said political slogan (h/t jamesmacaulay) or dog whistle (h/t gerikson). Both would have been more accurate.

                                                                                                                                                  The de minimis statement I made supporting my off-topic claim was “Your comment is a generic complaint.” I then provided a test so the claim can be falsified: “[Your comment] applies to any submission matching your pattern.” This same test holds without regard to the sentiment of the comment. A similarly context-free comment supporting, rather than detracting, this political slogan, dog whistle, or derivative name would also be off-topic.

                                                                                                                                                  We know that naming things is hard. The problem is featured in a widely known joke. (“There are two hard problems in computer science…”) We also know that names can be chosen because they’re provocative. (“There’s no such thing as bad publicity.”) Discussing names gets the benefit of the doubt regarding topicality. The comment in question is off topic qua a kind of behavior.

                                                                                                                                                  Thank you all for your replies.

                                                                                                                                                3. 1

                                                                                                                                                  I suppose to a progressive, the title would sound like “make medium awful again” – the exact opposite of what the author is trying to convey!

                                                                                                                                                  (I didn’t even pick up on the political reference until you pointed it out.)

                                                                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                                                                    Can’t speak for others, but to me the original intent was clear given the context. But it’s hard to divorce the connotations of opression and hate from it. As @JordiGH said so eloquently, at this point it’s impossible to ignore politics as they won’t ignore you. Using this language will hurt people. I assume this wasn’t anyone’s intention by choosing this name, so I’m just trying to point this out hoping that when the next time comes around people can make a more informed decision.

                                                                                                                                                1. 98

                                                                                                                                                  I’m sorry to bring this up, and it’s probably considered off-topic here on Lobsters, so feel free to flag this.

                                                                                                                                                  I know that OpenBSD and SQLite and lots of great pieces of software have been funded by the US military, and computing and military have a long and complicated relationship, but where do we as developers draw the line as to whom we are willing to accept contributions from?

                                                                                                                                                  This is from Palantir, the company providing the technology for Trump’s deportation machine. I don’t think that this is a black/white issue, and I guess it may be possible to work at a seedy company and still do good stuff. But the docs include a FlightSearch example; is that really appropriate given the context?

                                                                                                                                                  Regardless, thanks for releasing this as free software.

                                                                                                                                                  1. 37

                                                                                                                                                    Thank you very much for saying it. I think making sure these ethical topics aren’t ignored is the very least we all have a responsibility to do. It’s also entirely possible that there are people here who didn’t know about it, so it’s always worth saying.

                                                                                                                                                    1. 37

                                                                                                                                                      Thank you for saying this. I’m troubled by the cavalier attitude of techies toward ethics lately, and it’s nice to know I’m not alone.

                                                                                                                                                      1. 24

                                                                                                                                                        I don’t think a forum where this response is off-topic is worth participating in. The tech industry spends too little time thinking about the ethical implications of it’s products.

                                                                                                                                                        1. 25

                                                                                                                                                          Even today, we debate the ethics of using the data gathered from unethical experiments in WW2.

                                                                                                                                                          I agree that there is a massive ethical issue working for Palatir - and I am not sure it’s ethical to use the work they have produced. Particularly if it’s a Swagger-like clone not yielding substantive value to humanity.

                                                                                                                                                          1. 10

                                                                                                                                                            While we’re at it, you probably typed that on a machine made by highly-exploited workers in a corrupt country that does far worse, added to the lake in the process, probably paid a surveillance-enabling company in a police state to send it over the network, and possibly wearing clothes made by kids in a sweatshop. And you did all this to get online suggesting moral folks maybe shouldn’t contribute to a HTTP/JSON thing that’s open source since a bad company might misuse [more] open source. Seems hypocritical to me.

                                                                                                                                                            Where to we draw the line on how our consumption and contribution harms or helps others? And do you regularly do that for every product and service you buy? Most of them? Have you been active in government on laws, treaties, court cases, etc? The stuff that stops things like you describe. Or just some quick, social signaling on Lobsters getting feel-good points? If you care, I encourage you to put time into legal reform or bootstrapping alternatives to each of the things I mentioned. Maybe make for better opportunities for immigrants in whatever your country is, too. Maybe host some coding bootcamps or something for those in the slums. What you’re doing here is adding to the noise but not helping Trump’s victims or your country’s immigrants in any way.

                                                                                                                                                            1. 71

                                                                                                                                                              I feel like this is a great example of whataboutism.

                                                                                                                                                              I think that if this approach was applied to tech, we’d never fix a bug because “what about the other bugs that could crash the app, this is just virtue signaling because physical compromise means game over”. Why fix a bug when you can say “What about the terrible state of security education in general, why fix a security bug when developers are just adding more?”

                                                                                                                                                              It’s ok to make a judgement call and improve one thing in this messy world. It’s ok to try and reduce your footprint/total harm while hypocritically still participating in the system that feeds you. In fact that’s sort of core to improving those systems in a democracy.

                                                                                                                                                              Sorry if I misinterpreted your statement, I greatly enjoy your comments across the internet.

                                                                                                                                                              1. 11

                                                                                                                                                                Whataboutism is a common reply on HN or Lobsters when a popular group decries their outgroup’s activities, third party points out their actions are contrary to their own beliefs, adds that the biases indicate they’re scoring political points rather than really care, and someone pops in to say third party is whataboutism to silence those views. Thing is, whatever 3rd party brings up is almost never on these forums, getting crowd support, or whatever. Always absent. Rather than likely-intended purpose, the whataboutism claim just reinforces specific types of people supporting/rejecting specific activities by silencing dissenters. I mean, if commenter really cares about Trump’s horrors or not contributing to evil organizations, why the hell are they funding evil, slaving companies to buy toys to spend so much time on the programming projects? So, they probably don’t care or are acting like it now. Then, I do to them as they do to others.

                                                                                                                                                                Far as what I’m doing, I’ll tell you straight up. There’s been an increase over time of political comments that are about shaming people into behaving certain ways for a perceived, social good. Almost all of them are coming from hypocrits and/or slactivists. I mean, they’re talking on a forum no politician reads with low views. It’s not going to change Palantir’s or Trump’s practices. They know they avoiding stuff that can get results to spend time on Internet forums. So, they’re just getting an emotional high off attacking their opponents, looking like they’re responsible, or getting meaningless votes from people that agree with them. They also tie up our threads with that shit. So, as a real activist doing real-world work, I just call out their selfish, hypocritical bullshit to (a) deter more comments like that here and/or (b) encourage them to actually work on the causes they claim to work on.

                                                                                                                                                                Disclaimer: In fairness, people could (and do) call me out for not putting more time into actually building and deploying secure goods rather than high-level designs posted online. Although I defended my choice, I’m probably guilty of screwing up on a reasonable ratio between the two. Anything above zero code might be better. I plan to work on that more next year after I change circumstances.

                                                                                                                                                                Disclaimer 2: I say “almost all” cuz a few people here are legit activists or doing things at a loss to address the causes they’re talking about. I respect them a lot.

                                                                                                                                                                “It’s ok to make a judgement call and improve one thing in this messy world. It’s ok to try and reduce your footprint/total harm while hypocritically still participating in the system that feeds you. “

                                                                                                                                                                I totally agree with you. That’s not what the person was doing, though. It won’t stop Palantir’s contracts, it won’t stop the government’s activities, and proliferation of HTTP/JSON libraries will continue. The latter will even be FOSS so anyone, including Palantir, can use them. Maybe person complaining should start an alternative to Palantir that’s more ethical, organize boycotts of their products, get in a HR office poaching all their smartest talent (or delivering idiots), make enough money to pay off politicians to change government policies, and so on. Stuff that actually affects Palantir or Trump’s agencies.

                                                                                                                                                                “I greatly enjoy your comments across the internet.”

                                                                                                                                                                Thanks and same to you. :)

                                                                                                                                                                1. 25

                                                                                                                                                                  Maybe person complaining should start an alternative to Palantir that’s more ethical, organize boycotts of their products, get in a HR office poaching all their smartest talent (or delivering idiots), make enough money to pay off politicians to change government policies, and so on.

                                                                                                                                                                  This objection is absurd on its face. You can’t ethically compete in a market for unethical services. An ethical alternative to Palantir is an oxymoron, because Palantir’s ethical issues are fundamental to the things that Palantir sells. You also can’t “organize a boycott” of a defense contractor. Your final two points are literally “just have enough money to fix the problem”.

                                                                                                                                                                  How does starting a company which sells the same thing as Palantir to the same customers Palantir sells to, hires the same people as Palantir, has the same wealth as Palantir, and bribes politicians the way Palantir does, stop the problem of companies that behave like Palantir? You’re objecting to someone criticizing the status quo by telling them they should instead… further reinforce the status quo?

                                                                                                                                                                  1. 19

                                                                                                                                                                    I think you misapprehend what is going on here. This is a forum for highly technical people; by raising the serious ethical space Palantir exists in, it directly bears on creating difficulty in recruiting, along with decreasing retention.

                                                                                                                                                                    You, of all people, should understand the power of words on an internet screen to influence readers: you’ve been writing long & grammatically correct essays on security across multiple major internet fora for years. I’ve seen you on Schnier and HN, :) Communication, persuasion, and discussion are an essential activist activity. (And for my money, it is substantially more effective than picketing and marching 95% of the time…)

                                                                                                                                                                    1. 7

                                                                                                                                                                      (I suspect this was meant as a reply to the person I replied to.)

                                                                                                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                                                                                                        “by raising the serious ethical space Palantir exists in, it directly bears on creating difficulty in recruiting, along with decreasing retention.”

                                                                                                                                                                        I agree with you. I actively do that in real life every day for customers and coworkers wanting something better in a lot of areas. I have plenty of results to show for it. That’s because I put the time in where it gets results and consistently do it rather than one-off’s we sometimes see here. Companies like Palantir use recruiting practices that cast a wide net. Anyone wanting to disrupt their recruiting should be posting such comments on sites with massive numbers of page views that are mostly developers. Big, social media sites like Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and Hacker News. LinkedIn, too, if you can do it that way but I haven’t been on in long time. That’s why I encourage them to put political efforts in front of literally millions of developers instead of a hundred or less participating here if aiming for a big wave of change.

                                                                                                                                                                        “You, of all people, should understand the power of words on an internet screen to influence readers: you’ve been writing long & grammatically correct essays on security across multiple major internet fora for years. I’ve seen you on Schnier and HN, :) “

                                                                                                                                                                        You said long and grammatically correct. You gotta be messing with me on second half lmao. I agree with the power of words and persuasion as stated above. Hell, you had to have seen me do it there, esp to “Skeptical” (troll or near-perfect DOD apologist) before I left. That’s why I tell them to use that power where it gets results instead of Lobsters. Then, we keep Lobsters focused on deep, technical stuff with low noise. Anyone wanting to achieve political action can ping Lobsters, via dedicated threads or private messages, to go where the action is to get actual, Palantir-scale results.

                                                                                                                                                                        ““It is what it is”, which is what your comment & Nick’s comment promote, simply promotes apathy; history provides many examples of change taking place. I encourage people to shake off the belief that things will always stay the same.”

                                                                                                                                                                        That’s not true at all. I’ve just followed something like several lifetimes worth of history on the U.S. military and government under both left- and right-leaning leaders finding the military-industrial-complex just got more powerful over time. The politicians of both sides support it. The right supports companies like Palantir overtly. The left’s politicians will support the defense contractors for both payouts and to bring jobs to their districts. So, to change the situation voronoipotato describes, you have to get millions of people to vote out scumbags that take money to improve chances of elections to combat defense industry or get an anti-war, pro-immigration President in office with Congress willing to roll-back legislation.

                                                                                                                                                                        The last election surprised most lefter-than-I liberals that were trying to make people say the correct things on forums, etc in ways we see in some threads here. I doubt they’re capable of achieving that 180 directly if keeping same practices that failed before so hard they didn’t even see what was coming. Fingers crossed that we just get lucky that Trump does so much damage and embarrassment that a reversal happens in swing states after the Democrats get on top of their shit this time. Or we centrists get a President. Fat chance on that one since few listen to moderates. ;)

                                                                                                                                                                      2. 5

                                                                                                                                                                        The person you’re talking to likely doesn’t even think that Defense Contracting is unethical. Being said palantir is going to keep existing, boycotting doesn’t mean anything here because we don’t even buy their products. Even under a proper organized effort if we got a different defense contractor absolutely nothing would be different. The only tactics I’m aware we can do are mitigation tactics of not giving our labor to defense contractors, but this drives up the wages to the point where someone would. You can if you work there do a labor slowdown, but your ability to act in that way is limited, and useless if it’s not a group effort.

                                                                                                                                                                        Palantir is a bad thing but our ability to affect it is extremely limited. Electoral politics is mostly useless here. Their lobbying power affects both parties pretty evenly. IMHO it’s better to put energy into mitigation tactics into problems where it’s easier to have traction. One group has been for example paying for bail bonds for refugees.

                                                                                                                                                                        Defense contractor spending isn’t a symptom of capitalism but rather attached to the heart, a swollen vestigial organ from mercantilism and much like the appendix may kill you if you remove it unskillfully.

                                                                                                                                                                        I think it’s natural to see the biggest problem and try and lock horns with it, but sometimes a smaller problem you can solve is genuinely better than a larger problem you can’t. Obviously don’t work for them, there’s plenty of other places that pay you well and you won’t even have to think about all the bodies when you go to sleep.

                                                                                                                                                                        1. 7

                                                                                                                                                                          The person you’re talking to likely doesn’t even think that Defense Contracting is unethical.

                                                                                                                                                                          Yes, but the person they’re suggesting this in response to does, which was the context of nickpsecurity’s original suggestion to compete with Palantir.

                                                                                                                                                                          The only tactics I’m aware we can do are mitigation tactics of not giving our labor to defense contractors, but this drives up the wages to the point where someone would.

                                                                                                                                                                          I don’t know what your point is. Driving up wage costs for unethical corporations is the point of organizing an effort to boycott employment at specific corporations. The goal is making things like human rights violations untenable to corporations by making them unprofitable. Yes, this is a half measure - but it’s not nothing, either.

                                                                                                                                                                          Defense contractor spending isn’t a symptom of capitalism but rather attached to the heart, a swollen vestigial organ from mercantilism and much like the appendix may kill you if you remove it unskillfully.

                                                                                                                                                                          So your point is, we should leave it alone?

                                                                                                                                                                          I think it’s natural to see the biggest problem and try and lock horns with it, but sometimes a smaller problem you can solve is genuinely better than a larger problem you can’t.

                                                                                                                                                                          On the contrary - refusing to work for companies like Palantir and encouraging my fellow tech workers to do the same is one of my most fruitful opportunities to fight against systemic injustices at the moment. Each of us in the tech industry have far more influence on an our industry’s actions than on the actions of things like the federal government - there are less than four million programmers in the entire US, as opposed to the vastly higher number of voters. We should be adamant about using our privileged place as one of the few labor pools left with real negotiating power to prevent our industry from committing acts of evil, not conveniently defeatist whenever someone dares to suggest the small personal sacrifice of choosing not to directly build the tools of human misery.

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                                                                                                                                                                            Fundamental changes are achieved by many people choosing to not accept what is, and coming together to push towards a major change in the status quo.

                                                                                                                                                                            “It is what it is”, which is what your comment & Nick’s comment promote, simply promotes apathy; history provides many examples of change taking place. I encourage people to shake off the belief that things will always stay the same.

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                                                                                                                                                                              You said it even better than me.

                                                                                                                                                                          2. 20

                                                                                                                                                                            Whataboutism is a common reply on HN or Lobsters when a popular group decries their outgroup’s activities, third party points out their actions are contrary to their own beliefs, adds that the biases indicate they’re scoring political points rather than really care, and someone pops in to say third party is whataboutism to silence those views. Thing is, whatever 3rd party brings up is almost never on these forums, getting crowd support, or whatever.

                                                                                                                                                                            No it’s a common reply when you distract from the discussion at hand to go ‘oh but what about these other unrelated issues?’ Your response is literally at the level of ‘capitalism made your iPhone you’re using to have this conversation so checkmate’ in a discussion about economic systems.

                                                                                                                                                                            There is no ‘popular group’ here, there’s no ‘outgroup’, nobody is decrying anyone’s activities. You haven’t ‘pointed out’ any actions that are contrary to anyone’s beliefs or exposed any biases or virtue signalling. All you’ve done is responded to a post pointing out that Palantir might be an unethical company, accusing them of virtue signalling! They didn’t even say ‘Palantir is bad’. They suggested that it might be, and that it was worth thinking about and discussion. Did you then discuss it? Did you think about it? No, you just launched into an attack, said that their post was social signalling and accused them of hypocrisy.

                                                                                                                                                                            Imagine for a moment the discussion was oil companies, and the person you were responding to had said ‘I think oil companies often act unethically and I think we should consider whether we want to be working with them and contributing to their open source software’. Your response was the equivalent of ‘you don’t have an electric car so you’re not allowed to discuss this’. I hope you can see that that is nonsense.

                                                                                                                                                                            I totally agree with you. That’s not what the person was doing, though. It won’t stop Palantir’s contracts, it won’t stop the government’s activities, and proliferation of HTTP/JSON libraries will continue. The latter will even be FOSS so anyone, including Palantir, can use them. Maybe person complaining should start an alternative to Palantir that’s more ethical, organize boycotts of their products, get in a HR office poaching all their smartest talent (or delivering idiots), make enough money to pay off politicians to change government policies, and so on. Stuff that actually affects Palantir or Trump’s agencies.

                                                                                                                                                                            When someone says ‘where do we as developers draw the line as to whom we are willing to accept contributions from?’ they are opening up a discussion. Maybe the result of that discussion would have been ‘anyone actually’. Suggesting that the first thing you should do is start boycotting companies before the issue has even been discussed is ridiculous. Discussions are fine. Discussions are not slacktivism. Posting ‘#stoppalantir #metoo #stoptrump’ at the end of your tweets and doing nothing else in your life is virtue signalling. Discussing issues is not.

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                                                                                                                                                                              There is no ‘popular group’ here, there’s no ‘outgroup’, nobody is decrying anyone’s activities.

                                                                                                                                                                              A person submitted a HTTP/JSON toolchain that they were open-sourcing. A versatile, general-purpose tool that can be used for good if someone wants to. The comment I replied to ignored the software submission entirely to tell them they’re unethical for working at Palantir since other parts of the company uses its tech to serve an unethical customer. That’s decrying activities. Such reasoning also applies to companies like Google (or other surveillance companies), Apple/Foxconn, VC-funded companies aiming for lock-in, and so on since buying their stuff or contributing to their FOSS might support all kinds of evil. Some people supporting the decrying comment even work at such companies despite other jobs being available for people with that kind of talent. Strange.

                                                                                                                                                                              The fact that this accusation and suggestion to quit their job got 60 votes vs 7 about the submission… on Lobsters with lower numbers of votes to begin with… definitely says it’s popular. The marked difference between the people who support or question that tangent supports the existence of an outgroup relationship. I can’t say as much about what it means here since the outgroup receives more support on a lot of political divides. Lots of folks here hate companies like Palantir regardless of other beliefs. That’s what I’m leaning toward.

                                                                                                                                                                              It’s been an interesting thread to observe, though.

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                                                                                                                                                                                Wholeheartedly agree, there! I suspect I drew different conclusions than you, though.

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                                                                                                                                                                              People can disagree with you without being part of a conspiracy to silence or shame you. Maybe a less emotional response would be more informative.

                                                                                                                                                                            3. 0

                                                                                                                                                                              One of nick’s pastimes seems to be railing against liberal “hypocrisy” on this website, mostly by deflecting into muddy tangential arguments just like so.

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                                                                                                                                                                                Please don’t post ad-hominem attacks here. If you disagree with the argument, pick it apart politely.

                                                                                                                                                                                Lord knows you should have enough practice by now to do so.

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                                                                                                                                                                                  If you disagree with the argument, pick it apart politely.

                                                                                                                                                                                  That only works if both sides are arguing in good faith though which definitely doesn’t appear to be the case with some commenters on here.

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                                                                                                                                                                                    If that’s the case, then arguing further with somebody in bad faith is just going to create noise and antagonize other lobsters. Best just to ignore the posts then.

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                                                                                                                                                                                      I do but it ruins the lobsters experience for me to see people arguing in bad faith without any censure. Some of them even seem to be encouraged as a kind of clickbait/outrage generator. It’s disheartening.

                                                                                                                                                                                  2. 4

                                                                                                                                                                                    Lord knows you should have enough practice by now to do so.

                                                                                                                                                                                    This is an ad-hominem, friendly.

                                                                                                                                                                              2. 19

                                                                                                                                                                                Leaving whataboutism aside, I think you cannot conflate the (delusional) idea of ethical consumption with active usage and contribution of open source software.

                                                                                                                                                                                Ethical consumption doesn’t work for the structure of the market, where the contribution of the individual gives no perceivable feedback to the system.

                                                                                                                                                                                The Open Source world and software engineering are a much smaller world. It is a realistic goal to radicalize enough software engineers inside and outside of Palantir in order to halt their production. Your target audience has contract leverage, money and is highly connected and easily reachable.

                                                                                                                                                                                This is a much easier and realistic goal than convince the management of some big corporation to reduce their exploitation just because a small minority of consumers is unhappy. When they realize this, instead of reducing exploitation, they invest in more marketing to wash their brand, or they simply start a new one. Much cheaper.

                                                                                                                                                                                Don’t conflate your power as a consumer with your power as a producer, because they very different.

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                                                                                                                                                                                  I used to work for Nokia. They did everything in their power to ethically source all their materials. It was the only phone company that did that. Other companies don’t do that because nobody demands it from them. While there is no ethical consumption under capitalism, there is slightly less terrible consumption. So where do we draw the line? As deep into their pocket books as it can go.

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                                                                                                                                                                                    I didn’t know that about Nokia. That’s awesome! Thanks for the tip.

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                                                                                                                                                                                      Now, keep in mind the new Nokia phones are made by a different company that just licenses the brand. I’m not sure if care as much.

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                                                                                                                                                                                    […] the lake […]

                                                                                                                                                                                    That is horrible.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Seems hypocritical to me.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Ok.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Where would you draw the line personally? Do I understand your opinion correctly as suggesting that if you use a computer, then you shouldn’t be discussing unethical behaviour, e.g. racism? It is not my intention to judge here; just genuinely curious.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Maybe make for better opportunities for immigrants in whatever your country is, too.

                                                                                                                                                                                    I agree with this very much, and this is something that I aspire to do. Additionally I do have friends that have been deported, and worry a bit about my own not so distant post-Brexit situation in the UK.

                                                                                                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                                                                                                      Im glad you’re doing real work on this issue. I commend that.

                                                                                                                                                                                      Writing it here likely isn’t is the thrust of my point. Instead, it’s just adding noise to the forum plus sending a jab at one of only folks we know in Palantir doing something possibly beneficial (eg open-sourcing software for data analysis). The people here that would agree with your position already dont work for Palantir, use their services, or vote for folks that support horrible policies on immigration.

                                                                                                                                                                                      Those that do these thing are (a) mostly not on Lobsters where your comments bave about lowest ROI you can get and (b) usually disagree with you with no intent to change their mind based on your comment that states the obvious. So, you’re not reaching them. Goes for similar comments aiming for political impact on government-level stuff in non-political, Lobsters threads. So, I push for people not to introduce them.

                                                                                                                                                                                      Im at work now so responses might be delayed.

                                                                                                                                                                                      1. 5

                                                                                                                                                                                        mostly not on Lobsters where your comments bave about lowest ROI you can get

                                                                                                                                                                                        Yes, you are probably correct in that observation.

                                                                                                                                                                                        I wasn’t really sharing my thoughts here expecting any impact, but rather because I’m interested in hearing what other people think. And you are right that I’m being hypocritical here, because I doubt I’d react the same to an IBM project even though they have a shameful past; and even worse, I used to work on this phone app promoting some agrochem from DOW. At first I just kept my eyes on the code, but I couldn’t justify it to myself after reading about their role in the Vietnam War and the Bhopal Disaster and all that.

                                                                                                                                                                                        So, it was intended more of an open question about where people here draw the line.

                                                                                                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                                                                                                          Well, you seem to be speaking out of the heart on things you’ve been close to personally. I respect that. I still say low-ROI with better results elsewhere. You were bringing it up for good reasons, though. The community response also strongly favored your comment in a way consistent with prior threads on politics showing a shift in what Lobsters wants as a community. I’ll write on that in the future.

                                                                                                                                                                                          And it’s still cool you’re another person reusing older computers with the LiveCD tests and such. Off-topic a bit, but I was wondering if the hardware vulnerabilities they probably won’t patch on 5-10 year old machines have you considering new stuff? I always knew they were there. Now, they’re coming quickly with many eyeballs on them. Might be best reason I ever heard to get the latest and greatest from Purism, Raptor, or whoever. And then most have backdoors for (insert group) but fewer hardware 0-days for (more groups). Wait, I thought this tangent-tangent could lighten things up with easier choices… Looks just as hard… ;)

                                                                                                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                                                                                                            Off-topic a bit, but I was wondering if the hardware vulnerabilities they probably won’t patch on 5-10 year old machines have you considering new stuff?

                                                                                                                                                                                            I don’t know enough about this; what hardware vulns are we talking about here, and how easy are they to exploit? Although it’s not really about hardware, there’s that whole Intel Management Engine issue that is avoided by using somewhat old WinXP-era 32-bit laptops, so newer is not always more secure.

                                                                                                                                                                                            And it’s still cool you’re another person reusing older computers with the LiveCD tests and such.

                                                                                                                                                                                            Oh yes that thread! At least it’s a bit less harmful if we can use computers for longer. A friend of mine has a Mac that can’t get more OS X updates now, so she’s stuck with insecure versions of Firefox and all that. Gonna put Debian on it later this week, hopefully!

                                                                                                                                                                                            Do you know of any somewhat more ethical laptop producers?

                                                                                                                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                                                                                                                              re hardware attacks.

                                                                                                                                                                                              Essentially, the hardware has always been secure with only elite pro’s focusing on it. Now, due to Meltdown/Spectre, hardware attacks have gone really mainstream with all kinds of university research, private research, folks describing stuff on blogs, and so on. All the CPU’s that were highly optimized (esp Intel/AMD) are vulnerable to them needing patches. They’re doing the attacks over the network now. Older systems used to be safer but now they’re not since attacks will get more numerous and effective over time.

                                                                                                                                                                                              About the only things that are immune were simpler, embedded CPU’s. They’re not designed for security, though, with far less attention by defenders. So, that could reduce the hardware risk adding to the software risk. Simpler boards that can run modern, security-updated OS’s might help. I’m not sure. At lot of stuff is piling in.

                                                                                                                                                                                              re put Debian on it.

                                                                                                                                                                                              Ok, you’re already using that strategy. Good thinking and being helpful! :)

                                                                                                                                                                                              re ethical producers

                                                                                                                                                                                              I can’t remember since I was buying used ones like you. The one I see in media most with good things going for it is Purism. They try to disable the ME with software changes, too. Some folks pushing high freedom were using MiniFree to get ME-less, FOSS-firmware laptops. It had downsides. My own Core Duo 2 still handles stuff nicely outside games, highest-def content, and worst of web apps. Here’s a Guardian article I just found with some recommendations. Another said iFixit can help keep things going.

                                                                                                                                                                                              So, not a lot of options for new hardware minimizing harm to self and others. There are options in both reuse and new categories that help us reduce harm. We can at least do that. I stay dedicating slices of my research to solving this problem. Tracking whatever can help for whoever can do it. Maybe something will shake out eventually.

                                                                                                                                                                                      2. 0

                                                                                                                                                                                        Additionally I do have friends that have been deported

                                                                                                                                                                                        Sorry but are we now living in a world where the ‘standard’ left-wing political view in the Anglosphere is that any kind of deportation is bad? Because that’s how I’m reading this comment.

                                                                                                                                                                                        Immigration policy exists for very good reasons. The American political dichotomy that either there should be zero immigration or completely unchecked immigration is, for lack of a better word, moronic.

                                                                                                                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                                                                                                                          I think it’s fair to assume that the poster could be criticising the particular immigration policy that led to these deportations, instead of all immigration policy.

                                                                                                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                                                                                                            It could be fair, if the poster denounced similar and almost identical policies under the previous President. As it stands, the poster is mostly just criticizing immigration policies that seemed totally reasonable and main stream just eight short years ago.

                                                                                                                                                                                      3. 5

                                                                                                                                                                                        You can’t make perfect the enemy of good. Your argument essentially seems to be that if you can’t live perfectly you shouldn’t try living better at all.

                                                                                                                                                                                        It’s virtually impossible to operate in the modern world without using the internet, without having and using a computer. If it were possible to, for a reasonable price that I can afford but knowing I’d have to pay somewhat of a premium, buy a computer that I knew wasn’t made using exploitation of those in the third world, then of course I would buy one. But I don’t know that it is. And there are other competing priorities too, like getting a computer that is free of binary blobs and proprietary software.

                                                                                                                                                                                        I certainly don’t pay a ‘surveillance-enabling company in a police state’ to send anything over the internet. I pay an ISP for internet access, but I don’t live in a police state and as far as I know my ISP doesn’t enable surveillance.

                                                                                                                                                                                        In the same way that I think it’s perfectly reasonable for someone to say ‘I can’t afford to be vegan’ even though being vegan is morally important, I think it’s perfectly acceptable to say ‘I can’t afford to buy ethically produced clothes’. Plus there’s significant evidence that manufacturing things in third world countries has improving their living standards and wages considerably.

                                                                                                                                                                                        Where to we draw the line on how our consumption and contribution harms or helps others? And do you regularly do that for every product and service you buy? Most of them?

                                                                                                                                                                                        I like to have an idea, at least, of what goes into the things I buy, yes. It’s hard to do it with absolutely everything though, because there’s just so much different stuff.

                                                                                                                                                                                        Have you been active in government on laws, treaties, court cases, etc? The stuff that stops things like you describe.

                                                                                                                                                                                        That’s absolutely ridiculous. You do not have to be a member of government to have a political view. You do not have to negotiate an international treaty to have a political view. You do not have to sue someone to have a political view. Your standards are ridiculous.

                                                                                                                                                                                        Or just some quick, social signaling on Lobsters getting feel-good points?

                                                                                                                                                                                        Discussing important issues is not ‘virtue signalling’.

                                                                                                                                                                                        If you care, I encourage you to put time into legal reform or bootstrapping alternatives to each of the things I mentioned. Maybe make for better opportunities for immigrants in whatever your country is, too. Maybe host some coding bootcamps or something for those in the slums. What you’re doing here is adding to the noise but not helping Trump’s victims or your country’s immigrants in any way.

                                                                                                                                                                                        This has nothing to do with immigrants and everything to do with Palantir being a company that operates in an unethical manner. It’s a surveillance company. There’s absolutely nothing problematic about a company producing software on contract for a government that has immigration policies. The issue is that Trump’s policies are violating human rights in how they’re enforcing those laws.

                                                                                                                                                                                        You don’t solve this problem by creating ‘coding bootcamps’ for immigrants LOL.

                                                                                                                                                                                      4. 4

                                                                                                                                                                                        I guess it may be possible to work at a seedy company and still do good stuff.

                                                                                                                                                                                        Regardless, thanks for releasing this as free software.

                                                                                                                                                                                        Every field of endeavor is welcome here. Every field of endeavor is welcome here for technical discussion, free of (without expectation of) moralizing, guilt, or shame.

                                                                                                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                                                                                                          I personally already draw the line at technology coming from uber for ethical reasons, so I will not touch palantir things at all. Thanks for bringing that up!

                                                                                                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                                                                                                          I’m really surprised that they’ve not covered Rust’s “editions” approach in their background section, which aims for very similar goals - avoiding breaking changes by allowing modules built for different versions to work with each other.

                                                                                                                                                                                          1. 22

                                                                                                                                                                                            I think it’s generally worth following the recommended steps to get a project running to get an understanding of what it looks like in a known working setup before trying to configure the application in a different way to the developers.