Threads for breul99

  1. 5

    It’s strange for me to get a professional audio and at the same time settle for an integrated GPU.

    A tape for backups is a nice idea. I have to check it out, because it seems really cheap.

    1. 19

      They don’t have a GPU at all.

      There’s lots of strange choices here:

      • Gigantic gaming case
      • Even back in England a UPS would be pretty useless
      • Xeon but no ECC
      • I’m not convinced NVMe drives are practical yet - most software is not built for such fast disks which just moves the bottleneck to decompression. In particular, games are made primarily for consoles, and PS4/xbone come with HDDs
      • A DAC that’s probably worse than the one on the mobo
      • A hardware mixer for no reason
      • Expensive video input and microphone
      • No Noctua fans :)
      1. 12
        • 1080P monitor! While I personally love multimonitor setups, I get the author’s objection, but you can do so much better than the U2417HJ. Dell’s P2715Q is 4K, edit: 60Hz, IPS, 27 inch, rotates to portrait for those long source files, and is reasonably priced.
        1. 11
          • UPSes are never useless; every storage medium everywhere prefers a steady stream of clean power to an abrupt spiked shutoff. Always have a UPS on desktop machines (or carry it around yourself in the form of a laptop).
          • it turns out that games (and everything else) are bottlenecked by bandwidth and latency from the file system; SSDs, and NVMe in particular, are the best investment you can make for any computing purpose in 2017
          • almost any external DAC is going to be better than the one on the motherboard, because motherboards are a boiling stew of high frequency, erratic electrical signals and high power lines
          1. 3

            almost any external DAC is going to be better than the one on the motherboard, because motherboards are a boiling stew of high frequency, erratic electrical signals and high power lines

            Better perhaps, but does it make a difference in practice? I remember when the cheap integrated audio 15 years ago would whine loud whenever you move the mouse or stress the CPU. I think we have improved a lot since then. The noise rejecting circuits in modern op-amps can be pretty darn nice, and I think they might be using some shielding too. On my new board, the audio chip is stashed away in the lower left corner, pretty much as far away from everything as you can get.

            I can hear my mouse and SSDs whine, and my monitor buzz, but there is no sign of such noise on the audio output, which is connected to an external six channel phone amp, with sennheiser hd 650, hd 800, akg k701 and k812.

            1. 1

              I get buzz and whine on my onboard DAC; I suspect it’s down to how much a particular motherboard company cares. Interesting to hear that decent onboard DAC is possible, though. Who’s your vendor?

              1. 1

                My new board is some ASUS Crosshair whatever, AM4, for the Ryzen CPUs. That said, I’ve been using Shuttle mini PCs for a few years now (DS437 and DS57U7) and the output sounds ok to me. I don’t recall having noisy outputs on my laptops either (ASUS and Lenovo).

            2. 2

              Yeah, UPS’s wouldve helped me during numerous power outages and distortions back whdn I thought they were unnecessary. I always recommend them. Especially given problems tend to happen at worst moment.

            3. 5

              I do zero gaming, no bitcoin mining, and mostly use boring apps and the command line, so a GPU didn’t seem useful for me. But willing to change my mind if you think I’m wrong there.

              The case is actually smaller than it looks in the picture, it’s a “mini tower” that fits the Micro-ATX mobo form factor.

              The crazy audio stuff was presented a little bit out of context, I want to use my computer in conjunction with a cd player and ham radio, and possibly GSM phone bridge, and mix them all together.

              Nice fan suggestion.

              1. 7

                This set up will not work. The integrated graphics capabilities of that mobo relies on the processor having an integrated graphics chipset. Which yours does not. Alot of the choices for this build do not make much sense. If you haven’t purchased this yet I’d highly suggest rethinking your hardware/software choices as they really don’t line up with an optimal-developer machine.

                1. 1

                  Nope, haven’t bought anything yet. Can you suggest what hardware might be better?

                  1. 12

                    There are a couple oddities. The choice of a Xeon processor is odd because none of the typical features are being used. Reasons to get a Xeon: ECC ram, multiprocessor/dual socket mobo, getting an 8+ core intel proc, or running a dedicated server. If you aren’t utilizing these get a consumer grade i7 as you’re paying extra for features you aren’t using. If you are adamant on not getting a dedicated gpu, make sure the processor you’re getting as an integrated GPU as they sit on-core not on the mobo. I’d suggest an Iris pro capable processor if you want a more capable one or a 7700k. 1080p is pretty dated at this point, a 4k ips 60hz monitor would be better. For your external PSU, I’d suggest an APC as they have better support and typically are more reliable. The case is a bit expensive for what it is, there are cheaper/better/same looking cases out there. For the ram I’d look at a set with 14 ns for cas lat. I don’t really understand what you’re going for with the mic/mixer/cam setup. I’d get a c920 webcam + an o2 odac and what ever pair of audiophile headphones you want. I’m pretty sure you can grab a cheap sdr scanner off ebay for 20ish bucks. Tape back up is kind of odd, personally I’d go with an on prem NAS/ bluray discs for cold storage. Generating and storing secret keys… I wouldn’t worry that much about that. Most companies don’t even put that much effort into key storage. It’s odd that so much effort was put into getting a minimal desktop set up but that the base system is Debian … It would be easier to do an arch install and add what you need.

                    1. 2

                      This is great, concrete advice, thanks. One question: for the ECC memory would you recommend registered or unregistered?

                    2. 3

                      well, what exactly are you trying to do? What are your ‘boring apps’ and what do you do on the command line? The answer is going to be very different between a video/music editor (which you’re sort of seeming to want to set up like?) and a distributed systems researcher, or between either of those things and an enterprise java coder.

                      1. 3

                        Build Haskell apps (lots of compiling), edit videos, use software defined radio, have people connect remotely for pair programming. Then mostly a bunch of low intensity tasks like writing and email.

                        1. 4

                          You could probably save a great deal of money and time by buying a cheap prebuilt or a laptop, then. That’s squarely in the common case. Something like the Dell XPS13 laptop is famous and widespread enough that linux works quite well, there’s a tremendous amount of community support, and you get a UPS, video, and portability ‘for free’.

                          1. 1

                            Check out Field Programmable, RF Arrays if you’re into SDR. They’re cool.

                            1. 2

                              Several good, open-hardware designs on crowdsupply: https://www.crowdsupply.com/search?q=sdr

                              1. 2

                                Good to see one was funded that…

                                https://www.crowdsupply.com/lime-micro/limesdr

                                …comes straight from FPRF inventor who have EE expertise to deliver it. Might help with prototyping mesh, radio networks.

                    3. 4

                      If I’m not mistaken, you won’t get any image on that monitor, the Xeon 1240 has no integrated GPU and I don’t think that motherboard has one either, even though the page you linked made it sound like it has one. The Xeon 1245 would get you an integrated GPU though.

                      1. 2

                        A GPU is starting to make sense even if you only use the web browser as it will take advantage of it to more quickly render webpages.

                    4. 2

                      Not sure how good audio board support is across operating systems, but video driver support is definitly on the weak side. If you want to start experimenting with different os you might want to skip the video card.

                    1. 3

                      I have a 2014 MBP. Not sure how you would even know this was going to happen, but hopefully it never does.

                      Is this more of a one-off thing or have there been a lot of reports on that model?

                      1. 4

                        My MBP 11,3 has minor battery swelling, which manifests itself in the mouse not clicking correctly.

                        EDIT: Thank you for the concerns for my safety. I live very far away from the nearest Apple store, and am replacing it with a Dell XPS 15 9560.

                        1. 7

                          Please go and fix it, It’s a very, very serious risk. And Apple is very interested in fixing it.

                          1. 1

                            Last I checked, Apple didn’t give a shit about pregnant batteries that are out-of-warranty; went to a couple of stores in SV in 2012, and they said my battery is still “safe to use”, even though it no longer fits within the laptop. It didn’t even have the number of recharge cycles that it’s rated for, and makes the trackpad completely unusable, and even the back cover can be hardly closed when the battery is in.

                            http://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/76797/swollen-pregnant-battery-on-a-macbook-13-aluminium-late-2008

                            I still have it somewhere. Did they change their policy, or what?

                          2. 2

                            This is the only way to tell if the battery is swelling on the newer aluminum models without opening it, I’d look into it if I were you.

                            1. 2

                              My battery had swollen so much that it deformed the bottom case and my retina macbook didn’t sit straight on a table anymore. Apple fixed it even though it was out of warranty.

                            2. 2

                              My MBP 11,3 has minor battery swelling, which manifests itself in the mouse not clicking correctly.

                              Swelling occurred on the original battery in my MBP 9,1 (mid-2012) with similar trackpad problems. I replaced the battery myself with one from One World Computing and it continues to work though one edge of trackpad remains raised slightly above the case.

                              I’m not sure what I’ll replace it with, but Dell and Razor are contenders.

                              1. 2

                                Good, they should.

                              2. 2

                                Years ago I had a plastic MacBook, and my boss had I think a MacBook Pro, which each had trouble clicking at different times because of battery swelling. This puts it in a whole different perspective. Eesh.

                              3. 2

                                If this is caused by the battery swelling, I think your case will swell as well.

                                But I’m not certain.

                                1. 2

                                  I haven’t seen anything widespread.

                                  The proximate cause here was probably all of the air vents being blocked by the bedspread (on the 2015 model they’re spaced around the bottom of the case in a kind-of U shape). Heat a LiON battery up enough, and this is the result.

                                  1. 3

                                    I don’t think that’s a defensible position for Apple since that is a widespread use case for laptops and with all the tech packed into MBPs why don’t they have sensors to prevent this sort of thing from happening? Before the forced shutdown is mentioned, that was too little too late and was most likely a CPU threshold being hit, nothing to do with the battery.

                                    1. 3

                                      The battery was almost certainly compromised already, causing the overheating. The dropping sounds like it was the final straw.

                                1. 2

                                  You asked about Noctua fans, they are definitely your best bet for ultra quiet/reliable fans. I’m not sure if they make them small enough for the laptop though.

                                  1. 1

                                    And in colours other than brown ;)

                                    But seriously, laptop fans are usually a bespoke thing tightly integrated with the custom heatsinks.

                                    1. 1

                                      Thanks for your input both of you, I plan to open one of my Yeeloongs and evaluate the possibility. This will probably lead to another post with pictures of the internals ;)

                                  1. 1

                                    I fail to see the relevance of this article.

                                    1. 2

                                      His car wasn’t battered. It just had fading paint. So, uh, now you know.

                                    1. 2

                                      Shell may be more appropriate.

                                      1. 2

                                        I don’t think that’s quite the same. While shells are “terminal” programs, there are a lot of other programs that run on a terminal that aren’t shells (even though they probably get started from shells).

                                        1. 2

                                          Yeah. A terminal tag might be appropriate for shell stuff though.

                                      1. 2

                                        I have an Odroid U3; it was a semi-expensive exercise in frustration. It refused to boot; I reflashed with the blob and it still didn’t work; checked support channels, no go. Rinse, repeat, when I had a spare evening. Of course, it was weeks and weeks in, since I had my weekends occupied. So, it was out of the usual couple weeks when you can send things back.

                                        Things that were terrible:

                                        • The support channel is a forum with 1-2 devs with poor english

                                        • The documentation is bad and consisted of snippets from the Hardkernel company mag

                                        • The linux distros seemed to be only some variant of an older Ubuntu.

                                        • Who is Ameridroid? Why can’t this be sold through Adafruit or another reputable dealer?

                                        • semi-custom? memory chip (eMMC) setup.

                                        Now, I could have fixed this…. I could have found and fired up an O-scope, done a variety of debugging analyses on the firmware, etc. But I’m not really interesting in having an electronics bench and faffing about; what I really wanted was a cheap hardware server, which I didn’t get.

                                        So I came out of it really disgusted and wishing I had just bought 2 RPis.

                                        1. 1

                                          Did you try Arch ARM? I’ve found it to be the easiest distro to set up on these arm boards.

                                          1. 1

                                            Well, it didn’t even boot into the kernel. I was weary and didn’t really feel like fighting through the trouble. I think I just went and bought a RPi 2.

                                        1. 1

                                          Every time I try to like Safari I find myself going back to Chrome or Firefox. What advantages over these browsers does Safari bring to the table that make switching worthwhile?

                                          1. 8
                                            1. Battery Life is noticeably better than Chrome and FFX.

                                            2. Integration of bookmarks, history, etc with Mobile Safari

                                            3. It doesn’t record mic audio and stream it to google.

                                            1. 4

                                              My favorite feature is iCloud Keychain, which makes it ridiculously easy to generate & secure passwords across my iPad/iPhone/Macbook.

                                              1. 1

                                                Firefox doesn’t do that either, but I did say FF or Chrome :)

                                              2. 2

                                                Not sure, as I use Safari by default. However, I do use Chrome if I need to use Google Calendar / hangouts. I also use Chrome for Scratch, because of its built-in and self-updating Flash support. (I don’t otherwise have Flash installed.)

                                                1. 1

                                                  That’s part of my issue. I used Chrome for a long time because I need multiple G+ accounts logged in at the same time. I decided that supporting OSS was important so I switched to Firefox and now use multiple profiles for this - it’s not elegant but it works.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    There’s always Chromium, the upstream OSS project.

                                              1. 6

                                                Question for you Lobsters. Which should I learn next (after Erlang)… OCaml or Haskell? I can’t decide… I’ve heard good things about both.

                                                1. 18

                                                  Five years ago, I tried to tackle Haskell first, and found it way too weird. OCaml was a lovely way of getting used to a lot of concepts in the space while being able to be quickly productive in it (which is kinda necessary if you want to really learn the thing).

                                                  Learning OCaml then motivated some issues that Haskell addressed, so I was quite ready and enthused to learn about Haskell’s take.

                                                  You may find this route works for you.

                                                  1. 15

                                                    I’ve used both in significant anger and Haskell in production. Both are good next steps and both will take some serious getting used to over Erlang. Your personal goals will dictate the right next moves, so it’s worth noting that Haskell will introduce you much more forcefully to ideas of “purity” which can be very useful. OCaml is made somewhat simpler to understand by avoiding this issue. OCaml will introduce you instead to the idea of “modularity"—which is not precisely what you might think it is based on prior experience—and I’d say you should take a detour though learning that concept regardless of which one you end up investing more time into.

                                                    If your goals are more project-oriented then either can work, but Haskell’s library ecosystem is vastly better developed today. Haskell in production is tricky due to laziness—you will have to learn new techniques to deal with it. OCaml I’ve not used in production, but the challenges there seem more likely to be around getting the right initial momentum as you may have to write some significant portion of library code and work around a bit of ecosystem incompatibility.

                                                    Speaking of ecosystem again, OCaml has a standard library problem in that its genuine standard library is often not what the doctor ordered and there’s a choice of “extended” standard libraries. This choice sometimes feels a little forced which is slightly ironic due to the aforementioned modularity goals of OCaml, but c'est la vie.

                                                    The Haskell community has issues or benefits in that you will undoubtedly run into someone sooner or later who will happily try to explain the solution to a problem as a mere application of recognizing your algorithm as being a catamorphism over an implicit data type or will suggest refactoring your effect stack according to mtl or a Free monad. It might even be me that does this. Jargon aside there’s some significant insight that Haskell can be a gateway drug to. On the other hand, this can be the absolute last thing you want to hear when trying to get your project working. Mileage varies here.

                                                    The OCaml community has issues in that it’s small and sometimes speaks a lot of French.

                                                    Both communities are great in that they’re full of passionate and damn smart folks, though.

                                                    1. 8

                                                      I’ll throw my hat in for Haskell since you’ve gotten mostly “OCaml then Haskell”, “OCaml”, and “Both” answers.

                                                      Learn Haskell. It can be easier and less noisy than OCaml too. The ability to do ad-hoc polymorphism with typeclasses in a way that is more conventionally what people want out of polymorphism without giving up type-safety is pretty nice. If your goal is to learn new things, the overlap-but-different bits between Haskell and OCaml won’t do a lot of good either. Haskell’s built on a simpler core semantically as well.

                                                      tl;dr I got tired of writing .mli files, I prefer my types to be next to my code, and I found modules tedious for everyday work. YMMV.

                                                      You won’t harm yourself by learning both, but you’ve got to make a choice of where to start. I think there’s a lot to be said for learning Haskell first, hitting some limitations of typeclasses, then playing with modules in OCaml or SML.

                                                      Disclosure: I am quite biased, but this is stuff I actually use in my day to day, not night-time kicking around of pet projects. Haskell is my 9-5 and I wouldn’t replace it with OCaml. That said, if Haskell disappears tomorrow the first thing I am doing is writing a Haskell compiler in OCaml and I can’t say I wouldn’t enjoy it :)

                                                      1. 4

                                                        I think these points are totally spot on. I learned Haskell first then learned OCaml for a university compilers course. OCaml was trivial to learn if you’ve already learned Haskell. That sentiment is expressed in the introduction to Haskell for OCaml programmers. The OCaml for Haskell programmers really only covers syntactic differences.

                                                        Haskell is not really much more difficult to learn than OCaml, I estimate, but I don’t really know because I learned Haskell first.

                                                      2. 5

                                                        Why not dip your toes into both and see which you prefer? You’ll only be better for it.

                                                        1. 5

                                                          I’ve programmed a bit in both, and I would say either one would do. Personally I’m doing a bit more with Haskell lately, and typeclasses are a nice feature (as others have mentioned). On the other hand, perhaps the very rigid way in which Haskell deals with effects can be a little overwhelming at times, and OCaml would be a little less rigid on this front. Two other things I can think of which might also push you towards OCaml may be the recent excellent O'Reilly book Real World OCaml by Minsky et al (the same author as the blog post), and the similarity between OCaml and other ML'ish languages such as F#. F# is a fully open-source project and Visual F# is a first-class citizen within the .NET ecosystem, if that happens to be of interest to you. In short I would say you are choosing between two excellent and well-designed languages and really can’t go too wrong. You’ll probably want to check out the “other one” (as I have) irrespective of which way you step now. Good luck!

                                                          1. 4

                                                            I personally prefer Ocaml, although I wish it had haskell style typeclasses.

                                                            1. 5

                                                              The good news is that there is experimental work ongoing by Leo White, Frédéric Bour and Jeremy Yallop to provide something like that – more like modular implicits.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                This is relevant to my interests. I’ve been exploring some similar ideas for my pet language, and while I don’t think I’d take this exact approach, it looks like a very good read.

                                                            2. 4

                                                              Coming from Erlang, getting used to either one will require a bit of mental rewiring. Haskell more than OCaml, since with OCaml you’re allowed to throw printfs (not literally) around. OCaml’s type system is not as expressive than Haskell’s but it is certainly very advanced in its own right and it probably is easier to learn.

                                                              Fundamentally, both belong to the ML family, so learning either one first will help in learning the other. If I could choose I would learn Haskell first, because it is stricter in the type system sense. Moving to OCaml will feel like loosening a belt, so to speak. That said, OCaml isn’t a simpler language by any means: it has a powerful OOP system, module functors (think parametrized static classes) and a great record system. Recent versions added GADTs. Concurrent and parallel programming on OCaml is a sadder story, but work is being done on it.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                Both, but start with OCaml.

                                                                Both haskell and ocaml are very similar in many ways. Type signatures, HM-like type inference, etc. However, in Haskell, many things are more “magic”, whereas in OCaml, code is typically more explicit.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  It depends on what you want to accomplish. I would feel much more comfortable deploying Ocaml to production than Haskell. Ocaml (currently) is very easy to reason about how it will perform, as it does not do any super interesting optimizations. The computation model is also much closer to how I feel comfortable thinking (eager evaluation). Haskell on the other hand can be deployed to production (Facebook is doing it), but they also have Simon Marlow on the team so I’m not sure if that is an unfair advantage. That being said, if you want to expand your world of how computation can be, Haskell is well worth diving into.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Haskell, or F# instead of OCaml. You’ll find that F# is more widely used because of Microsoft’s backing.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    Reminds me of StackSort.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      The author complains about not users not auditing installed plugins, but then recommends a new solution by saying:
                                                                      “I haven’t audited it conclusively but its relatively small codebase includes lots of https:// and no http:// or git:// that I could see.”

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        That seems like somewhat of an audit to me ;-)

                                                                      1. 5

                                                                        I’m working on the Ruby JIT portion of this project, and can answer some questions if people have them.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          How Java-ish is the underlying VM?

                                                                          In my experience, the JVM is actually a big pain point because of its complexity (I’ve probably seen more downtimes due to the JVM needing tuning than the application being wrong), and part of that is because the semantics of Java are unfriendly when it comes to creating garbage. As a comparison point, Go and Ocaml have run-times and GC times that are competitive with Java despite being significantly less tunable and significantly less man-years put into them.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            We are integrating directly into the CRuby (MRI) interpreter.

                                                                            The Ruby VM (or at least the YARV bytecode interpreter portion) has certainly taken some inspiration from the bytecode of the JVM, though Ruby’s bytecode is untyped. Pat Shaughnessy’s excellent book Ruby Under a Microscope has some pretty good coverage of the YARV VM, and would be worth perusing if you’re interested in the VM mechanics. As far as object allocation, I don’t have a good feel for how YARV would compare against the JVM, nor vs. Go/OCaml.

                                                                          2. 1

                                                                            Any thoughts on supporting Haskell/OCaml? How many people are working on the project?

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              Hmm. Hard to give a good roll call off the top of my head. I’m not really comfortable guessing outside of the compiler team (mine). On the compiler team, I would say seven developers mostly full time (most developers have responsibilities for pieces outside this effort still).

                                                                              Doing a functional language like Haskell/OCaml would be a really interesting proof point for the effort we’re trying, to make language agnostic compiler technology. For now, we’re focused on Ruby and Python as our proof points, but we definitely want to make it relatively simple to support other languages.

                                                                              I’ve never really peeked into the intermediate language of a functional language compiler, so I can’t speak to how it would map to our technology, though I can say that our intermediate representation is fairly imperative… so I suspect there could be an impedance mismatch. Not insurmountable mind you, but just more challenging.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            You know an architecture is truly dead when Debian drops support for it…

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              And yet this is actually a port that only runs on sparc64 machines, of which new models are still being made.

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              The only time I use Markdown is when I’m interacting with GitHub, Otherwise LaTeX is just far more superior, I can convert from tex files to pretty much any other format I need.

                                                                              1. 11

                                                                                “curl -Ls http://bit.ly/gh-install-package | sudo sh”

                                                                                No thanks bye.

                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                  Or just read the script, dl it, then run it. But some people don’t care enough to do that.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    You have the steps out-of-order: You have to download the script, then read it, then run it. If you read the script in the browser before runing the “curl | bash” it could serve different scripts to the different user agents (or after enough hits from one IP, etc.)

                                                                                  2. 3

                                                                                    So you trust the strangers that contribute to the package repository you use more so than any other strangers? What makes them different?

                                                                                    1. 9

                                                                                      Are you seriously asking why someone would rather install packages from Canonical or Apple instead of sudo executing a script blindly downloaded from bit.ly?

                                                                                      I’d like to see more projects get called out and shamed for doing this. It’s super dangerous and it’s a stupid idea to get people used to doing it. “I’m blindly sudo executing a script from the internet” should set off huge alarm bells in people’s heads. It shouldn’t be something they’re doing every day.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        But the packages aren’t all made by Apple or Canonical. Surely a package repository is just a centralised spot to run programs from strangers under sudo.

                                                                                        What centralization can bring is the ability to catch malicious scripts before with their first few strikes, but that hasn’t exactly worked with, for example, Android.

                                                                                        In the end, you’re still trusting somebody. And I’m not saying blindly execute it, I’m saying there’s a high probability you’re already blindly executing code under sudo. I don’t wish to pressure anybody into installing like asked, simply to say that those “alarm bells” should be going off a bit more, then.

                                                                                        1. 4

                                                                                          Right. And that gets back to your original question about trust.

                                                                                          The answer is “Yes”, I trust Apple and Canonical a whole lot more than a project I’ve never heard of, asking me to sudo execute content pointed to by bit.ly. Not even hosting it on their own page makes it just that much sketchier.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            That does indeed make sense.

                                                                                            Personally I don’t feel the same amount of trust that you do in companies like Apple or Canonical since usually when I install stuff, they’re only the middle-man in this situation, not the origin of the code (for the package and/or the install script).

                                                                                            That being said, I seem to implicitly trust people and will download nearly any executable I feel is something I want and doesn’t look too shady. :P

                                                                                            Also upon reviewing that script, it seems surprisingly apt-get and yum specific. And bit.ly seems to have been used to shorten a gist URL.

                                                                                      2. 7
                                                                                        1. Downloading over an unencrypted, unauthenticated connection. At least with SSL, someone must MITM the connection or hack the endpoint. Over an unencrypted connection, any chucklefuck anywhere between you and whoever you’re talking to can do whatever they want with your connection, and because you’re piping it into a root shell, they can do whatever they want with you.
                                                                                        2. The script itself downloads a bunch of stuff over http, duplicating the error even if you go to the trouble of downloading ahead-of-time and verifying, or find a secure endpoint to grab it from.
                                                                                        3. On yum-based systems, it circumvents proper dependencies to install either mysql or mariadb. So not only are you instructed to get it wrong, it then behaves wrong, too, which gives me no confidence in it.
                                                                                      3. 1

                                                                                        Requiring root to install software is a horrible anti-affordance we as an industry ought to be working to stamp out. Actually, uid 0 is the real problem, but we have to start somewhere.

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          Looks like there’s a “manual installation” section if you’re interested.

                                                                                        1. 6

                                                                                          I’m not sure I ‘get’ this - how does it improve over RAID, or RAID in a ZFS pool? It tries to use Samba instead of a RAID controller?

                                                                                          1. 5

                                                                                            Its a userspace tool, while RAID/ZFS is kernel space. Each drive is readable on its own without the rest of the pool. There are options on how many different drives to copy each file onto for redundancy, and drives of different sizes are allowed.

                                                                                          1. 4

                                                                                            Garbage article, very little beyond speculation.