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    Ah, OSNews, it used to be my home-base in early aughts when the idea of the alternative OSes getting some mainstream acceptance weren’t so crazy.

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      These days it’s mostly rants against Apple - which I do not mind - but often unfortunately based on incorrect knowledge. Some unnecessary and unwelcome “woke” politics have crept in, too.

      It’s sad how it degraded, but there’s still interesting posts once in a while, so I still track it via RSS.

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      So by now everyone here knows I was/am a big Amiga guy.

      E was my favorite language on the Amiga by far. It started out as limited shareware (I can’t remember what the limitation was…a maximum number of lines compiled or something?). I remember how excited I was when the full version of E was released on some Amiga magazine’s coverdisk (Amiga Format IIRC).

      (I was almost certainly the only Amiga user in small-town east Texas in 1992. Those coverdisks were a lifeline.)

      E was my primary language on the Amiga for a while. I wrote a utility that would periodically flush unused modules from the Amiga’s memory and delete unlocked files on the RAM disk to save on memory. I wrote PEEK and POKE commands to do memory manipulation/dumping from the shell (the OS had no memory protection). I wrote a little mail program that read…I cannot for the life of me remember what it was called. The bundled mail format used by BBS’s back then. I wrote a little menu-driven choose-your-path text adventure (“The Rift”, which had all of the terrible writing that could be produced by an angsty teenager. It was pretty short but its plot was a fairly blatant ripoff of Dreamweb).

      E had a really nice system called EasyGUI (I think EasyGUI was also written by Wouter but I don’t remember). EasyGUI was a breath of fresh air on GUI programming. It was what passed for declarative back then (and it still pretty good today, IMHO). You used E’s fist-class list types to layout the GUI in nested lists-of-lists; the first element of each list declared the widget type and the remaining elements were arguments. It did automatic layout and handled resizing and font size differences (a real problem on the Amiga). If you had ever written a GUI in raw Intuition (or with GadTools, which was easier but extremely limited), EasyGUI was a revelation. EasyGUI got you 80% of the way to MUI with 10% of the code.

      E deserves a renaissance, a compiler for modern systems or something.

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        The bundled mail format used by BBS’s back then

        QWK packets?

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          YES! Thank you!

          Also…the fact that a user named “xmodem” gave that answer made my day. :)

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            that brings back so many memories…

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          Man, I’ve spent so much time writing in E. I still sometimes come across (and cringe at the quality) some old source codes of my small tools. All praise EasyGUI, I remember writing terrible “layouting” code in Intiution that always came out badly in different resolutions/fonts sizes. I was too stupid to grasp MUI, so EasyGUI was it for me.

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            You should be writing E in tine. :)

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              I remember when I discovered c:ed and wanted to wrangle it. It scared me from line editors for life. ;)

              Cygnus and later GoldEd were “good enough”. I even tried using Vim with GeekGadgets but the experience was meh.

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            Do you have any more links or information about EasyGUI? I’m not able to find anything except a Python project, which I assume is entirely unrelated.

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                Thank you!

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            Huh… it’s not this E. Any other programming languages with single-letter names out there? I mean, besides C, D, and J?

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              I think that’s why it was normally refered to as AmigaE.

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                There is at least one for every letter of the alphabet. https://beza1e1.tuxen.de/one_letter_proglangs.html

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                This is a really great talk, highly recommended even if you don’t care about graphics or game development.

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                  All Casey’s talks are awesome.

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                    His sense of humour is all sorts of absurd and lovely. He’s the same way on the Handmade Hero stream.

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                      You should hear Jeff and Casey show, it’s the best podcast ever.

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                        I think I prefer Idle Thumbs and the Diecast, although I do skip to the bits I like, anything mentioning Far Cry 2 for example :) So I actually only listen to about 50% of each episode for each of those.

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                          I tried that a month ago, actually, and I didn’t find it enjoyable in the same manner. Not sure why.

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                          You should hear Jeff and Casey show, it’s the best podcast ever.

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                      I’m really confused, is this satire? How does an image appear in a source code file? I’m unable to verify any of these by looking at the project’s source code.

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                        I had to stop and work this out too. It’s a sad reality when you can’t quite work out whether some JavaScript developers really did decide to embed the entire Encyclopaedia Britannica in their library.

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                          Such an article that is not obviously satire (it doesn’t read as such to me) can give a lot of people the entire wrong impression about the projects listed.

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                            On the other hand, if people have trouble figuring out this is satire, maybe it doesn’t even give a wrong impression - as in, yes this is hyperbole but not far from reality so it reasonably approaches reality. So concluding that “this is madness” from such a satirical article is not completely wrong as reality is already “this is very close to madness”.

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                          It is.

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                            The node.js file from babel for reference: https://github.com/babel/babel/blob/master/packages/babel-core/src/api/node.js

                            It’s a really well-done satire that many people will believe is true. Only thing, the twitter like part was the weakest part since you need twitter credentials to “like” stuff.

                            I was hoping for a discussing on how to minimize the dependencies. Maybe agreeing on some meta-package included with all new npm releases containing the most commonly used libraries in one solid and well-integrated library.

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                              The twitter liking came close to making a very good point, but it’s a little opaque. The issue here is not just about bloat and wasted resources and slow startup times, but how well do you understand what it does? This is code that’s running, doing something, but what? Do you trust it?

                              As satire, maybe the weakest part, but probably the most important lesson.

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                                When I started reading the article I assumed the author had used node’s request library to interact with twitter in the past and had their credentials saved in some kind of global cookie jar.

                                The Encyclopædia Britannica one was the best though, I can seriously see that happening.