1. 1

    Also why reseting some elements if you are not using them in your project. Example: If you don’t have forms in your project don’t reset them.

    This makes me think there should be a pre-processor tool for including resets only for the HTML you include in your website.

    1. 1

      I was thinking that, but the problem isn’t important enough for the amount of work that would be.

    1. 4

      There’s not much to see so it’s difficult to judge. I think it was Bootstrap that started the trend of a-lot-of-dashes which I’m not a fan of (although it’s a very popular style of writing CSS).

      I would highly encourage anyone who is looking to switch to a Flexbox layout to first learn how to use it (and there is a lot to learn) and then using a framework like this if it seems more convenient.

      Of course the spacing on the example website is no bueno, but I know that’s in part because you haven’t finished the content part of it yet.

      1. 1

        Yes, you first should know what is Flexbox, then you can use my framework to speed up your work.

        About spacing…I want this spacing to separate items, but the framework does not create it…it’s mine style. Remember, Strawberry does not add graphic style.

      1. 3

        It’s a good thing that Firefox now allows users to preemptively disable all future notification requests.

        So what is the end goal of this type of hack? I assume the assumption is that someone will just say “yes sure fine”, but then they could easily go into their system UI(?) to disable the notifications after they leave the browser. Notifications in browsers don’t exist in iOS so I don’t know the mechanism for how Android handles this.

        1. 5

          but then they could easily go into their system UI(?) to disable the notifications

          What you’ve just described is beyond the technical abilities of most people, in my experience.

        1. 1

          The funny thing about this post is that this is the most positive take I’ve seen on Gnome 3 in a while.

          1. 5

            It looks cute, but I can’t imagine playing games with that. I can feel my hands getting cramped just looking at that demo video.

            1. 2

              I’m more worried about my fingers hurting from the tiny friction, with the PS1 I remember my fingers hurting from the D pad. I’m not sure if my eyesight will be able to appreciate all the magic either.

              1. 1

                Their OLED display is native “96 x 64 px, cropped to 5:4 ratio”, so actual display area is 80x64 pixels. The Game Boy LCD resolution was 160×144. So if the picture seems blurry and cramped, it’s not just your eyesight. I’m sure it’s fine for Tetris, though.

            1. 6

              I don’t think this advice is particularly applicable because it’s only a few services like Medium that actually take a personal blog post and turn it into a multi-megabyte mess.

              Anyone using a standard Wordpress theme or writing their own template is likely not to incur that much bloat because most of the bloat comes from unused widgets (that Medium thinks are neat), ads, useless analytics, random JS garbage that Medium thinks is neat, and preloading gigantic images.

              1. 2

                The website feels snappier

                1. 2

                  Standard warning that Tedu self-signs his SSL so that’s why the error comes up.

                  1. 4

                    Standard rant that this breaks both archive.org and archive.is

                    1. 2

                      Non-standard effect that 3 out of 3 comments are about the self-sign instead of content. He’s achieved his intended milestone of 100% tangent in a submission about something on his site. I’m going to do something about that in next comment.

                      1. 1

                        I totally agree with his reasoning though… Me reading his blog doesn’t need third party approval to be ‘secure’ when unencrypted http between the same two people is fine according to the browser.

                    1. 6

                      The comments section of that article is a good example of what to remove with such tech. Also why I stopped commenting there. Amazing how much a combo of paid trolling and Slashdot-style influx can change a site.

                      1. 2

                        Wow, that comments section is like reading something out of Infowars. I’m surprised he doesn’t just close that off.

                        1. 2

                          If yall are wondering, here’s how the discussions looked years back when I hosted my essays and designs there:

                          https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2011/06/court_ruling_on.html#c552667

                          That topic is banking security where a court ruled substandard security was OK. I designed a solution to the problem based on my prior work. A bunch of people jumped in with ideas. Such peer review and people adding enhancements was common enough on Schneier’s blog that I just dropped anything I had there first. People left one by one until a handful remained… buried in noise of paid trolls and low-quality comments. Such a loss.

                      1. 5

                        I lost my Telegram account when I lost my phone number so it’s difficult to take the argument about backups and message histories seriously. Apps like Telegram seem nice until you realize you’re at the whims of your phone company when it comes to a third-party app’s sensitive data.

                        1. 3

                          “Unscathed” is the nicest thing you can say about the development of Virtualbox. I think about projects like Vagrant that exist because people don’t like using Virtualbox’s CLI and I think about the paid alternatives that aren’t cheap, but people are willing to shell out for something with a better UI.

                          1. 4

                            It makes me sad there there are so many different instant messaging platforms in common use today and they are all proprietary and unfederated walled gardens.

                            • iMessage
                            • Skype
                            • Facebook messenger
                            • Snapchat
                            • Google Hangouts
                            • Google Allo
                            • WeChat
                            • SnapChat

                            I would like for something like XMPP to be successful, but it seems more and more unlikely as time goes on.

                            1. 4

                              I until recently would have agreed. However, I think that Conversations on Android showed that you can make a good client that people seem to be able to agree upon. Having something like that (a dominant, fully featured, yet simple to use) application, maybe web application could make things better again when using XMPP.

                              If not I hope that Matrix picks up some steam. It looks promising, however I think it’s too early. Currently the clients are very rough around the corners and only techy people seem to use it. That’s not a complaint, other than against myself, for not helping out - or not having time to.

                              This is all based on the assumption that the major reason for not using XMPP is the lack of easily working desktop/mobile sync, especially in combination with encryption. OMEMO to me is the best thing that has happened in a while.

                              1. 3

                                I’ve sometimes thought that the only reason we have good email interoperability is because there was no profit in running email systems back when the standard was written.

                                It seems that there’s no way to create a commons once a market develops. (I’m happy to be proven wrong, and would love to see counterexamples!)

                                1. 3

                                  XMPP is evolving with the times. You can now get end-to-end encryption, and mobile-friendly optimizations that minimize polling and save battery life.

                                  Android client: https://conversations.im/

                                  iOS client: https://chatsecure.org/

                                  Eventual codebase unification: https://chatsecure.org/blog/chatsecure-conversations-zom/

                                  Riot/Matrix isn’t XMPP but is similarly open: https://matrix.org/docs/projects/client/riot.html

                                  1. 3

                                    Not to mention KakaoTalk, WhatsApp, and LINE, which are crazy popular in places that aren’t the US.

                                    1. 3

                                      You listed Snapchat twice!

                                      1. 2

                                        I think there is a slight difference with iMessage. When it comes to the Mac app, you could plug in all sorts of services that had XMPP as their baseline. This fell apart over time as Facebook, Google, etc. all closed up and in the High Sierra version of Messages you can only add smaller Jabber/XMPP services.

                                        For a lot of those services, they did start out as open XMPP services, but it’s likely the case that they realized they didn’t want the competition on the client side.

                                        1. 1

                                          I think part of the issue has been XMPP’s lack of adoption of new market features, and how hard it’s been to keep up with the pace of innovation throughout the entire XMPP federated network. If those challenges can be made simple, I’d expect there to be an increase in adoption. I don’t know if that would be enough to start chipping away at the network effect however.

                                        1. 27

                                          Even as a web developer, I haven’t heard of this browser until now. If you visit the website with an ad blocker then you get this warning:

                                          We love ad blockers as much as you, but we depend on ad revenue to fund various sites and services. We use responsible ad services to keep your visit to our websites a safe and uninterrupted one. To ensure our continued operation, please disable your ad blocker for this site or support us another way.

                                          Why would an open-source browser use advertisements on their main website? The worst part, these ads are definitely not safe or responsible.

                                          http://i.imgur.com/neimpSW.png

                                          http://i.imgur.com/yOZyWJM.png

                                          1. 7

                                            I don’t think ads on the website is necessarily an evil way for an open source project to fund itself, but asking to disable your ad blocker under the pretence that your website has only responsible ads, only to try to trick users to install malware when they disable the ad blocker, is definitely not okay.

                                            Neither is blacklisting an add-on for that matter. At least you can disable the blacklist in the configuration, but the argumentation from moonchild was extremely weak, even trying to argue that the add-on in question is malware because it makes the user part of a “botnet”.

                                            Pale moon never really struck me as my kind of browser, but I tried it once and thought of it as a nice project which could be an alternative to Chrome if Firefox ever went down the drain. I gotta say I don’t think quite as highly of it anymore - but crucially, they at least don’t try to prevent you from disabling the blacklist.

                                            1. 2

                                              I wouldn’t say “evil” necessarily. It’s a word that is too easily thrown around by GPL supporters.

                                              But if you want people to support your open-source project then you have to do so in the clearest, most honest way. It’s part of the open-source culture.

                                              I can tell what the web devs were thinking “oh, Google is a big ad company. Of course they are going to filter out the worst ads!” And Google think so themselves which is why they have placed themselves on the good side of their initiative against sneaky ads in Chrome.

                                              The problem of course is that Google actually isn’t great with filtering advertisements. It’s (relatively) easy to publish something on DoubleClick which can spread malware. And that was obvious when I visited the Pale Moon site and saw two DoubleClick banners.

                                          1. 35

                                            Focusing heavily on how it makes a robot computer feel, these posts ultimately neglect what will be the deciding factor in Electron’s success or failure: how it feels for most people to run Electron apps day-to-day.

                                            This is my favorite line because it doesn’t have any resemblance to reality. I nearly threw my tea at my laptop screen at the idea that people enjoy Electron apps especially the idea that they like those apps more than native applications.

                                            Slack is widely thought of as an application people have to deal with. Atom is an okay application, but when push comes to shove, they have to use native code to get decent performance. Basic things like resizing a window will make Slack drop frames. The writer must have a really low bar for what counts as an enjoyable application. I receive some great emails, but that doesn’t make my email client any better.

                                            I can speak for myself when I say Electron runs like a dream. On a typical day, I’ll have about three Atom windows open, a multi-team Slack up and running, as well as actively using and debugging my own Electron-based app Standard Notes. I’ll also have a bunch of other non-Electron apps opened or running, like Adobe Photoshop, three Terminal windows with 3–4 tabs each, Sequel Pro, Google Chrome with on average 4–5 tabs, Apple Mail, iMessage, Little Snitch, Dropbox, and iTunes/Apple Music.

                                            I also really enjoy this one because the long list of apps is made to sound like there’s a bunch of usage going on, but maybe this writer doesn’t realize how little consumption goes on in the background with these standard macOS apps when they’re “open” (Messages, really?). Photoshop also uses very little RAM if you don’t actually have anything open. This is also supposed to be bragging about using all of these applications on a computer with 16GB of RAM. That is quadruple the amount of RAM that most people use on a typical laptop.

                                            1. 11

                                              To those who run the slack desktop app, my question is… Why? Why not just use it in a web browser where it belongs? If people need you, they’ll find a way to contact you.

                                              1. 11

                                                The brilliance about Slack’s business is that it’s both a business application and an instant messaging platform. Both of those together create an evil combination where the people who need to use it are those who need to use it all day long.

                                                For any number of reasons, people generally like to be able to open/close browser tabs & windows without worry that some important business application wherein people expect a response from you within minutes (if not seconds) will be lost. This is especially true if you’re a web developer who will need to close all windows or restart the browser on a regular basis.

                                                Slack has just become too important in the lives of many (thus all the consternation about how terrible the app is) and using it as a separate application makes things a lot cleaner and simpler.

                                                1. 5

                                                  Pinned tabs?

                                                  Also does Slack support web push? If it does, you should be able to just close it and get notifications.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Luckily, it doesn’t (I get enough notifications while I’m working, no need to spam me even more when I decide to focus and close the browser tab)

                                                2. 8

                                                  I couldn’t find a way in the browser to be able to stay logged in to multiple slacks at once, so I have to run the desktop app.

                                                  1. 6

                                                    When you run things in a browser you lose really basic command-tab functionality in OSX

                                                    You also have browser chrome to deal with , as well as all the browser UI cruft (don’t need to see that URL all the time)

                                                    I think voice chat doesn’t work in Slack on the web either?

                                                    I think some of this is solvable , but I haven’t ever found much reason to not just use the slack app that works

                                                    1. 5

                                                      You also have browser chrome to deal with , as well as all the browser UI cruft (don’t need to see that URL all the time)

                                                      Not necessarily. With Chrome you can create chromeless “applications” from any URL. This is what I do with Spotify, Outlook 365, and HipChat. Spotify in particular is much faster that way than “native.”

                                                      1. 2

                                                        oh is this possible? How do you do this?

                                                        1. 4

                                                          On Windows it’s Menu > More Tools > Add to Desktop. Then make sure that you check “Open as Window.” Voila! Your web page is now a standalone application!

                                                          1. 3

                                                            Just had a look at Chrome on Mac OS and couldn’t find anything like this.

                                                            I’ve been using Fluid to turn web apps into standalone apps, works quite well (aside from the resource usage of course).

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Yeah. A little searching shows that option is only available on Windows and Linux, not Mac OS.

                                                    2. 6

                                                      Why not just use it in a web browser where it belongs?

                                                      Judgy judgy! :)

                                                      I don’t particularly like running “applications” inside web browsers because my browser is a dynamic place. I open tabs, close tabs, move things around etc all the time and frequently need to restart. In short, for my use case, browsers make AWFUL persistent application platforms.

                                                      1. 4

                                                        I used to use Slack in the web browser. I’m on Linux and wanted to try to use Slack’s voice call features, and the browser version wouldn’t let me select my speaker/mic device, so I couldn’t use it.

                                                        Then I heard there was a Slack desktop app, so I thought, hey maybe that will work. So I tried that. But I had the same problem.

                                                        I never switched back to the browser version because there’s really nothing that has made me want to switch. It’s using about 700MB of RAM right now, and that feels pretty par for the course to me. My gmail tab is using just as much. As a bonus, the Slack desktop app uses my notification daemon that I have running (dunst), which lets me very easily dismiss or recall notifications without touching the mouse.

                                                      2. 5

                                                        Photoshop AND Sequel Pro opened at the same time?! This just reads as someone enumerating the apps installed on his laptop…

                                                        1. 3

                                                          This is my favorite line because it doesn’t have any resemblance to reality. I nearly threw my tea at my laptop screen at the idea that people enjoy Electron apps especially the idea that they like those apps more than native applications.

                                                          Clearly native applications are better in some respects (they may be faster, more conformant to local UI norms, etc.)

                                                          However the key question is - Is having a cross platform electron app to solve a particular task better than not having that niche served at all?

                                                          1. 4

                                                            I was responding to the idea that the writer threw out there that Electron may use a lot of resources, but it’s in service of making a better UX & UI for users. He didn’t actually elaborate on that probably because there is no way to defend that position.

                                                            It’s a lot more easily defensible to talk about the business side of web apps rather than anything technical. In the particular case of Slack, that company has plenty enough money to completely rewrite their web app as a set of native apps, but why would they when everyone is already locked in?

                                                            I also like that he used some strange math to say that his basic note-taking application would cost $500 when, last time I checked, not even the most complicated native applications run by the smallest teams that would need the most money actually charge that much money for their apps.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              not even the most complicated native applications run by the smallest teams that would need the most money actually charge that much money for their apps

                                                              I wish! Have you seen what Autodesk charges? And they’re subscriptions

                                                            2. 3

                                                              To which the obvious response is: does any electron app serve a unique purpose?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                The same question could be asked of any given native technology. This is almost but not quite a troll :)

                                                          1. 1

                                                            If this is the best that the AI field can come up with then we have a long way to go until we have a bot that can be confused for a human.

                                                            I am honestly surprised at how simple-minded this bot can be to actually get tripped up just because a sentence has “good” or “bad” in it.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              I am honestly surprised at how simple-minded this bot can be to actually get tripped up just because a sentence has “good” or “bad” in it.

                                                              It’s nothing more than word-based pattern matching. I’d be surprised if it worked at an acceptable level.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              There’s an argument to be made that macOS is better documented from an average user point-of-view. There are extensive reviews of every piece of UI on macOS and the Knowledge Base articles written by Apple are more detailed instructions on how to use hardware/software than I’ve seen within any individual tech company.

                                                              When are we going to see the 20 page review on the next update of Ubuntu? The Arch Wiki is known to be the best source of Linux documentation because all other sources are lacking.

                                                              The main problem with Apple’s Unix utilities has less to do with documentation than it has to do with the utilities themselves. If Apple isn’t keeping their utilities up-to-date with mainstream then why would they document those utilities?

                                                              1. 41

                                                                I don’t think syntax highlighting is a sign of weakness or not understanding a language.

                                                                1. 7

                                                                  I wonder if someone would see it as a weakness to use proper formatting or to use obviously named variables. It’s just a preference like tabbed spacing or anything else.

                                                                  1. 6

                                                                    On one hand, humans have color perception for a reason, so not using syntax highlighting is consciously handicapping yourselves.

                                                                    On your other hand, the article argues that syntax highlighting distracts you from semantics, so maybe what we should really use is semantic highlighting. But even then you’d still be using colors, so either way.

                                                                    1. 14

                                                                      What I’ve found is that, especially in Vim, because just about everything is highlighted, it ends up just looking like a big jumble of colours and nothing stands out (it’s also very inconsistent and the syntax files are a mess). And then you’ve got issues like native types being highlighted, while custom types aren’t recognized which is just confusing. I’m a fan of minimal highlighting, and I’ve gradually dialed my personal colour scheme right back to only highlighting comments and ‘TODO:’, ‘NOTE:’ (so they really catch my attention), and a few very specific things like function/method definitions to make it easier to visually scan a file.

                                                                      1. 7

                                                                        I think colors are best reserved for marking important things. Splashing the code with a rainbow of colors prevents anything from standing out.

                                                                        1. 6

                                                                          I wrote on this topic; I agree that going without syntax highlighting is making it harder on yourself (e.g., not noticing that the code you are looking at is in a huge comment block or that you used an incorrect escape sequence), but too much highlighting and nothing particularly stands out. I made my own theme where most text is in one color, and I highlight comments, string literals, function definitions and a couple of other constructs. I particularly like the highlighting of function definitions, it helps my to quickly see where one function starts and where another begins.

                                                                          I don’t have any particular talents in art, color theory, design, UX, and all that, and I’m sure that a competent theme designer could take only 3-4 colors and create a theme that really highlights the value of syntax highlighting.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            not using syntax highlighting is consciously handicapping yourselves

                                                                            While understanding that syntax highlighting, like editor and programming language choice, is highly subjective, I disagree with this statement.

                                                                            I personally find that disabling syntax highlighting, and all colors in my terminal, helps me to focus on the actual semantics. I find that I actually read the code more carefully and retain more of the substance than when using highlighting.

                                                                            I also find that disabling highlighting is particularly useful for viewing files written in programming languages I’m less familiar with. While yellow may mean parameter in one language, it may mean class declaration in another. Disabling colors completely removes any chance of information bias based solely on a first glance.

                                                                            I would love to see any studies you have to support the theory that not using syntax highlighting when reading code is an intentional handicap. I would also love to know in what ways you think it is handicap. Is my understanding of the code compromised? Am I slower and less productive? How do you measure how handicapped I am?

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              I personally find that disabling syntax highlighting, and all colors in my terminal, helps me to focus on the actual semantics. I find that I actually read the code more carefully and retain more of the substance than when using highlighting.

                                                                              “On your other hand, the article argues that syntax highlighting distracts you from semantics, so maybe what we should really use is semantic highlighting.” :P

                                                                              I would love to see any studies you have to support the theory that not using syntax highlighting when reading code is an intentional handicap.

                                                                              Here you go!

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                “On your other hand, the article argues that syntax highlighting distracts you from semantics, so maybe what we should really use is semantic highlighting.” :P

                                                                                Yes, that’s why my statement was prefaced with “I personally”. I interpreted your use of “on your other hand” (emphasis mine), to mean you were incredulous of that argument. I was adding my own personal experience and preferences to the discussion.

                                                                                I can’t speak to the papers, as I’m reading them now, but I appreciate the sources. You did not, however, answer how I am handicapped. Simply trying to authoritatively state that forgoing highlighting makes me perform at a lesser degree than someone using highlighting is a broad and vague statement.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  That’s fair. My position is more philosophical: colors are very information dense for humans, so we should leverage that for parsing code. That doesn’t mean any particular syntax highlighting scheme Is Good, or even that our current position on syntax highlighting Is Good- I think it’s helpful, but there’s a lot of room for improvement.

                                                                                  One thing I haven’t really seen, but am really into the idea of, is semantic highlighting. That would be things like “color any function that’s imported somewhere else in the codebase” or “highlight any variable I later mutate.” Those would potentially be a lot more powerful than just coloring keywords and such, but would also be trickier to write a highlighter for, which might be why nobody’s done it yet.

                                                                                  Edit: “your other hand” was a typo :/

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    That’s also fair. I was mostly just wanted to dig into the theory that anyone not using highlighting is intentionally handicapped. I, clearly, disagree there but I definitely accept that feelings around highlighting, like most programming-related meta-things, are highly subjective.

                                                                                    While I do not use highlighting, I’m also interested in seeing how tools can improve to help people perform their tasks to the the best of their ability. I’m not opposed to highlighting existing and would love to see improvement made to make highlighting more useful. Semantic highlighting would be very interesting and I would definitely give it a try.

                                                                                    I just don’t don’t buy that I’m at a disadvantage by not using normal syntax highlighting.

                                                                                  2. 2

                                                                                    Neither paper actually says I am at a handicap. What they do say is that syntax highlighting is useful among certain portions of the programming population for quickly identifying certain characteristics about a program. Neither explores whether the users already used syntax highlighting, or the same tools and same colors used in the study, or how the highlighting affects the understanding of a program in someone who normally does not use highlighting,.

                                                                                    I believe you are misrepresenting the data in those papers as “not using syntax highlighting is intentionally handicapping yourself” when in fact the first paper says syntax highlighting can be beneficial for identifying certain program constructs (first paper) and the second paper clearly states that “the magnitude of the effect [syntax highlighting has] decreases as programming experience increase”, though it does say it can reduce context switching.

                                                                                    So, my question is still, why do you think I’m at a disadvantage and how does this manifest?

                                                                                  3. 1

                                                                                    Very interesting links, thanks for sharing. When I was debating a similar subject, I was looking for similar documents but could never find any.

                                                                                2. 2

                                                                                  On one hand, humans have color perception for a reason, so not using syntax highlighting is consciously handicapping yourselves.

                                                                                  I’ve never seen this brought up about IDE’s. That’s a great point. It’s reinforced in many other areas such as UX and marketing materials. Hell, even the milk I buy is always red since many generic, grocery items are categorized by color for instant recognition. It’s proven to be a useful psychological effect in general. So, we should leverage color for categorization in IDE’s. How to best do that is obviously still an open topic but keywords vs functions vs type vs etc have been useful so far.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    keywords vs functions vs type vs etc have been useful so far

                                                                                    I don’t agree with this at all. I appreciate that people like it, but I bet many orders of magnitude more time have been wasted trying to tell the difference between $accountCount and $accountCⲟunt than between private and personal.

                                                                                    Maybe even more when you consider colour fatigue tricking the programmer into thinking there’s no difference between the lines…

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      Hmm. We could make the keywords all one color with the usesr-supplied identifiers on a given page being different colors. How about that?

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        Maybe. It certainly sounds more useful than what vim and sublime editor do. There’s some risk though, and it’s unclear how common purposeful variable shadowing is:

                                                                                        let accountCount=get(); 
                                                                                        do_something(function() {
                                                                                          let accountCount=get();
                                                                                          ...
                                                                                        });
                                                                                        

                                                                                        The two “accountCount” variables above should be different colours, and while shadowing occurs frequently in my programs, in other programs it might be a bug.

                                                                                3. 2

                                                                                  Obligatory quote: http://aiju.de/rant/syntax-highlighting

                                                                                  That is what overly highlighted code looks like to me.

                                                                                  For me, proper indentation / spacing and code layout is way enough for reading.

                                                                                  For writing, highlighting strings reveals to be appreciated to me, but still, in languages such as shell script, you can quote every single word or let it unquoted. Syntax highlighting for strings then become totally pointless.

                                                                                  When I use vim, I switch between :syntax off for less rainbow reading and writing and :syntax on when I have a doubt about a string quote in a shell script or such.

                                                                                  Proper color theme is also a good compromise.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    What I am often looking for with a syntax highlighter is a good linter instead. A syntax highlighter is also a linter that display the result as colours on the text…

                                                                                1. 18

                                                                                  This post is very confusing because it doesn’t actually answer the title. But here are the main takeaways:

                                                                                  • Rails is not dead, it is still very popular and also the best. This is not an opinion. Don’t trust opinions.
                                                                                  • Okay, maybe the project made some bad decisions
                                                                                  • Okay, maybe a lot of people left it for other things
                                                                                  • Other languages are less popular and/or dumb
                                                                                  • People left the framework because they are lazy
                                                                                  • Everyone else is a bad programmer and that’s why they use other projects

                                                                                  This post is meant to be a serious look at the state of RoR, but instead comes out as even more rambling than the other articles the writer criticizes.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    It felt more like a primer on the history of web development in the last 15 years, than to explain why its lazy to badmouth Rails.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    To say replacement instead of alternative is strange because you would expect a utility like ls to be as generalized as possible and building in features like Git is a bit much.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      I offered to take over the abandoned project please.pet so I’ll be going through and closing down any bugs I can and such before the process of taking over maintenance. I ask that any one else help contribute code as it is a very sweet and cute project.

                                                                                      I’m helping out Cuddli as they have launched their iOS app (after so much time!).

                                                                                      On top of all of this, I’m moving many of my things to a different house and preparing for an interview.