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    Thanks to all the people running this site!

    1. 1

      I think the discussion about the implications of this AI is super interesting, but let me tell you fellow lobsters, this blew my mind. And I enjoyed getting my mind blown, and encourage you to do the same. Just reflect on this fascinating technology and stop other thoughts in your brain for a few minutes. Just wow.

      1. 12

        A while back I bought two of these USB Thinkpad keyboards, using the old (good) keyboard layout: https://www.newegg.com/lenovo-thinkpad-usb-wired/p/N82E16823218006

        I have used the crap out of them. They are the absolute best.

        Internally it’s just a USB controller attached to the same keyboard that shipped in older Thinkpads, so I’ve already fixed up at least one keyboard with parts from eBay.

        Despite things like Vimium or i3 or other ways to reduce mouse usage, most folks still need a mouse from time to time. Reducing the travel time from your keyboard to your mouse seems really high value to me, and I’m lost why most of these custom or fancy keyboard people don’t focus on having a nearby mouse of some kind?? I’m not the OP of this thread, but I highly empathize: https://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicalKeyboards/comments/626sga/how_about_trackpoints/

        These Thinkpad trackpoint keyboards are perfect. The mouse is right there.

        1. 10

          I love my shinobi tex, a mechanical homage to the thinkpad design: https://tex.com.tw/products/shinobi

          1. 4

            Just got yesterday mine. Such a pleasure to have again some key travel, and feeling the fingers match the keys. Really nice to alternate with the laptop keyboard (X1E Gen1) and is an incentive to work more at the desk with a big screen. For me the trackpoint on the shinobi work much more precise and easy. I was expecting a little more pressure resistance from the keys, but in the end I think it is quite comfortable. It’s really nice too that there is a deeper mold in the keycaps. Was expensive, but I’m definitely happy about this purchase.

            1. 4

              oh my gosh i’ve never seen this before, this is amazing!

              1. 4

                Woah! This is the first keyboard I’ve seen in years that tempts me…

                1. 3

                  How are the key symbol printings holding up? I got mine a week ago and I’m already noticing L-Ctl, Esc, and frequent letters fading. It’s not a big deal since I don’t really look but I’m surprised.

                  1. 3

                    I’ve been using mine for ~9 months daily, and while it’s true that some letters started fading very quickly, they seem to have reached a “plateau”. Definitely the discolouring has slowed its pace or the keycaps would be blank by now.

                    1. 2

                      Same here. Fading on frequent used keys. Been using it since last november.

                  2. 5

                    Thank you for your comment. I feel the same way about trackpoints, and your comment made me order a ThinkPad USB keyboard :)

                    I really like the newer chiclet design, so I’ve picked a more recent model. Luckily they seem to be designed with a similar concept; reuse of the existing laptop keyboard design (see https://dontai.com/wp/2018/09/06/thinkpad-wired-usb-keyboard-with-trackpoint-0b47190-disassembly-and-cleaning/ for disassembly). The number of key rows don’t really bother me, and for all I’ve tried I don’t feel comfortable on keyboards with mechanical switches. Too many hours on a ThinkPad, I think.

                    1. 4

                      i am very happy lenovo is still making these keyboards, even if it’s the new layout

                    2. 4

                      I have one of these and I love it! I’m a sucker for the trackpoint and I love the pre-chiclet key design. It’s super portable too - I can easily throw it in my backpack with my laptop if I’m going to be out of the (home) office all day.

                      It’s a little sad that these version seem to be so unavailable these days :(

                      1. 4

                        I’d recommend ThinkPad TrackPoint Keyboard II because it is wireless - via Bluetooth or Wireless Nano USB Dongle.

                        1. 5

                          I own the first generation as wired version and the micro USB socket is absolute garbage. Two out of three keyboards lose USB connection when the cable is moved slightly. But, this problem can be fixed pretty easily by disassembling the keyboard, bending the socket back to normal shape and then adding a large solder blob to the socket case such that it can’t bend that easily anymore. I fixed both keyboards reliably with this procedure.

                      1. -4

                        What is this?

                        1. 4
                          1. 2

                            Not 100% sure on what the this is referring to, but if it is Gemini, here is more info on that: < https://gemini.circumlunar.space/>

                            The tl;dr is that Gemini is a relatively young protocol somewhere in between http and gopher for serving text.

                          1. 21

                            Agree that CPU and disk (and maybe ram) haven’t improved enough to warrant a new laptop, but a 3200x1800 screen really is an amazing upgrade I don’t want to downgrade from.

                            1. 6

                              I love my new 4k screen for text stuff.. Sadly on linux it seems to be pain in the ass to scale this appropriately and correctly. Even more with different resolutions between screens. So far windows does this quite well.

                              1. 4

                                Wayland can handle it ok, but Xorg doesn’t (and never will) have support for per-display DPI scaling.

                                1. 3

                                  I don’t see myself being able to afford a 4k screen for a few years but if you just scale everything up, what’s the advantage?

                                  1. 4

                                    The text looks much crisper, so you can use smaller font sizes without straining your eyes if you want more screen real estate. Or you can just enjoy the increased readability.

                                    Note: YMMV. Some people love it and report significantly reduced eye strain and increased legibility, some people don’t really notice a difference.

                                    1. 2

                                      I use a much nicer font on my terminals now, which I find clearer to read. And I stare at terminals, dunno, 50% of my days.

                                      This is a Tuxedo laptop (I think it’s the same whitelabel as system86 sells) which don’t feel expensive to me.

                                      1. 1

                                        Which tuxedo laptop has 4k?

                                        1. 1

                                          I can’t find them anymore either. They used to have an option for the high res display. I go this one a bit over a year ago:

                                          1 x TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 v4  1.099,00 EUR
                                           - QHD+ IPS matt | silber/silber | Intel Core
                                          i7-8565U
                                          ...
                                          Summe: 1.099,00 EUR
                                          
                                          1. 1

                                            how was your driver experience ? I’ve had to re-send mine twice due to problems with the CPU/GPU hybrid stack. Though mine is now 3? years old.

                                            1. 2

                                              Drivers are fine, it all simply works. Battery could last longer.

                                          2. 1

                                            Yeah ok. I just ordered a Pulse 15. Also wanted a 4k display but didn’t see it anywhere. thanks

                                          3. 1

                                            hah I’m also using a tuxedo one, but the font is far too tiny on that screen to work with everyday

                                          4. 1

                                            well you have a much sharper font and can go nearer if you want (like with books). I get eye strain over time from how pixelated text can appear at evening to me. Also you can watch higher res videos and all in all it looks really crisp. See also you smartphone, mine is already using a 2k screen, and you can see how clean text etc is.

                                            You may want to just get an 2k screen (and maybe 144 FPS?) as that may already be enough for you. I just took the gamble and wanted to test it. Note that I probably got a modell with an inferior background lighting, so it’s not the same around the edges when I’m less than 50CM away. I also took the IPS panel for superior viewing angle as I’m using it for movie watching also. YMMV

                                            My RTX 2070 GPU can’t play games like destiny on 4k 60 FPS without 100% GPU usage and FPS drops the moment I’m more than walking around. So I’ll definitely have to buy a new one if I want to use that.

                                          5. 1

                                            I also just got a new 4k monitor, and that’s bothering me also. It’s only a matter of time before I fix the glitch with a second 4k monitor… Maybe after Christmas

                                            1. 2

                                              I ended up doing that. It sucks, but Linux is just plain bad at HiDPI in a way Windows/macOS is not. I found a mixed DPI environment to be essentially impossible.

                                          6. 2

                                            This is where I’m at too. I’m not sure I could go back to a 1024x768 screen or even a 1440x900 screen even. I have a 1900x1200 xps 13 that I really enjoy which is hooked up to a 3440x1440p ultrawide.

                                            Might not need all the CPU power, but the screens are so so nice!

                                            1. 2

                                              And the speakers.

                                              I love my x230, but I just bought an M1 Macbook Air, and god damn, are those speakers loud and crisp!

                                              1. 1

                                                For me it’s also screen size and brightness that are important. I just can’t read the text on a small, dim screen.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Oh I’d love to have a 4k laptop. I’m currently using a 12” Xiaomi laptop from 2017 with 4GB of RAM and a 2k display. After adding a Samsung 960 evo NVMe and increasing Linux swappiness this is more than enough for my needs - but a 4k display would just be terrific!

                                                1. 2

                                                  My last 3 phones and my last 3 laptops were hand-me-downs or bought in good condition.

                                                  I agree with OP that the second-hand market for Thinkpads is excellent. My second-hand, seven-year-old x230 is the laptop I enjoy using the most, even if it’s a bit slow nowadays.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    Do we really want polarising posts like these on lobsters? Seems like a hacker news kind of thing to me, and I don’t think anyone would miss the arguments.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I feel like if we restricted the site’s posts to “things unlikely to be contentious between programmers” there would be a quick decline in content…

                                                      But in all seriousness, I view things here as more tightly focused and reasoned discussions than HN, not a place where things that are broadly on-topic but controversial are off-limits. That said I think some pushback is good - I wouldn’t want the majority of posts to be so deliberately provocative.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Yeah, you make some good points. Thanks

                                                      2. 2

                                                        I was wondering whether to post it.

                                                        I did it because I found it was a good article (even if structured to be controversial) and I wanted to read informed retorts. We have some graybeard unix wizards here on Lobsters, and I thought the discussion would be good.

                                                        In any case, as @cepheus mentions, I don’t think that a restriction of controversial articles would be positive for a news site, as long as the controversy is technological and not pure drama or tech politics.

                                                      1. 4

                                                        When would someone prefer OpenBSD to FreeBSD?

                                                        1. 12

                                                          For me, better defaults.

                                                          I just installed it, the only configuration change I needed to do was to activate apm.

                                                          1. 9

                                                            The minimalism is appealing, simply because there’s less you need to understand to feel confident in your systems. (same reason why I prefer to run OpenBSD over Linux.)

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Security, cohesion.

                                                              I would probably use openbsd (rather than freebsd) if not for zfs.

                                                              1. 4

                                                                All the time? ;D

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  FreeBSD is I think the right choice if you want to have a good base with ZFS and every software out there packaged and up to date.

                                                                  OpenBSD is like a study in simplicity. I really enjoy things like how they manage wireless networks, no networkmanager or wpa_supplicant, sound without pulseaudio (you can use sndio on FreeBSD as well but you need to compile your own packages).

                                                                  OpenBSD feels more like things done right/simple, while FreeBSD for many purposes feels more like “a better linux distribution”, with both stable base and up to date packages, without having to deal with third party repositories

                                                                  Another differencen for the decision can be whether you want to use just base. While on FreeBSD you can do some basic stuff like running an NFS server without any packages, OpenBSD will give you an httpd server, complete with the means to get a letsencrypt or other acme based certificate, you will also get a pretty nice smtp server (no imap server though) and also typical user facing things, like tmux, X with a couple of window managers are part of the base system.

                                                                  But then again very big reason for choosing any general purpose OS is taste.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    OpenBSD is simpler in all the good ways, but lacks some important tech. Jails and ZFS at least.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      ZFS

                                                                      There was talk of porting HAMMER from Dragonfly years ago. I expect this to happen with HAMMER2 at some point.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        That would be very cool indeed. Figuring out an openbsdy way to do jails would be amazing as well.

                                                                  1. 5

                                                                    An interesting take. Glad to see Linux is still an option and really surprising that perceived performance between KDE and Gnome have flipped.

                                                                    • Surprising to hear that there isn’t a Google Drive client on Linux (as I recall there used to be one), don’t many engineers at Google use “Goobuntu”? Perhaps they don’t open source the client for public use.
                                                                    • I know that Steam works on both, do you find that your OS dictates what games you play most, or no?
                                                                    • OP didn’t mention the screen quality or eyesight issues, curious if there is a noticeable difference between the two? As I suspect there would be.
                                                                    1. 9

                                                                      Goobuntu (Ubuntu) was replaced by gLinux (Debian) a couple of years ago for maintainability reasons. They’re functionally the same though.

                                                                      The machines that we develop on is about what we think gets the programming job done, not as an indication of the target platform.

                                                                      My guess is that the numbers were crunched and found that Linux users would not have made up enough share to warrant a client. I’ve never missed it, I do all my office work directly in the browser, and we have company-wide disk snapshotting for backup purposes. On my laptop (which isn’t snapshotted) I use RSync.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Ahh interesting, thanks for the update.

                                                                        The machines that we develop on is about what we think gets the programming job done, not as an indication of the target platform.

                                                                        Of course, but I’d imagine that some engineers would want to have native document sync with GDrive. I also use GDrive, but honestly found the syncing annoying when the usage flow is nearly always New tab > drive.google.com > search doc. But certainly someone on gLinux wanted to keep it? :shrug:

                                                                        What exactly are you rsync’ing against?

                                                                        1. 4

                                                                          Laptop (not snapshotted) > Desktop (snapshotted)

                                                                          But yeah, we just use the web interface for all docs writing stuff. For documentation (not documents), we have an internal Markdown renderer (think GitHub wiki with internal integrations). No one writes documents outside of a centralized system, and so has no need to back them up with a client.

                                                                      2. 6

                                                                        (I’m not OP) I recently started playing games on Linux via Steam. For reference, I’ve never been a Windows gamer – had been a console gamer up to that point. To answer your question:

                                                                        do you find that your OS dictates what games you play most, or no

                                                                        Pretty much. I play only what will work, so that means the game must either officially be supported under “Steam OS + Linux”, or work via Proton. But this is just me. Others are free to dual boot, which, of course, vastly broadens their spectrum of available games.

                                                                        1. 5

                                                                          I used to be a dual booter, but since Proton, so many games have been working on Linux that I stopped booting to Windows. Then at some point my windows installation broke and I never bothered to fix it.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            That’s cool. However, I think we’re a ways off from totally being on par with native Windows. Several anti-cheat systems are triggered by running under Linux. And protondb shows that there are still many games that don’t run.

                                                                            That said, things are improving steadily month by month, so that’s encouraging.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              That’s true, I didn’t mean to imply that all games I would like to play work on Proton now. But enough of them work now that instead of dealing with Windows for a game that doesn’t work on Proton, I usually just go and find something else that does.

                                                                              If you have a group of gaming buddies, that obviously won’t work, though. It won’t be long before they get hooked up to a Windows-only game.

                                                                          2. 2

                                                                            Same here, I find the biggest area where I need to switch back to windows is for multiplayer. I used to lan a lot and still have many of those contacts. I find a lot of games that have a host/client multiplayer, for example RTS games, have issues on linux even if the single-player works flawlessly. This means I have to keep dual boot available.

                                                                            Even though linux does strongly influence which games I play, the range and variety is amazing and it is not reducing the quality or diversity of games I play at all. There are just a few windows only titles that I might play slightly more if they were available on linux.

                                                                            While we are on the subject, what are people’s recommendations for a gaming distro? I am on Mint at the moment which is good, but I like to have options.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              I don’t know if I’d call it a gaming distro, but I have been using Gentoo for many years, and it seems to be doing just fine with Steam (which I just installed a couple months ago).

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                Frankly, I’m not sure you need a gaming distro. I’ve had little issues running Steam and Wine (using Lutris) games on Void Linux, Debian, etc. (Mind you: always using Nvidia.)

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  I actually phrased that really badly, thanks for the correction. I tried out a dedicated gaming distro and it was rubbish. Mint is a variation on Ubuntu.I was looking at Debian to try next.

                                                                                  It seems like the thing to look for is just something well supported with all the common libraries, so most big distros appear to be fine for gaming. The reason I am not entirely pleased with Mint is that they seem a bit too conservative in terms of adding new stuff to the package manager when it comes out. On the one hand that makes it more stable, but on the other games use a lot of weird stuff sometimes and it makes things a bit messy if you have to install things from outside the package manager.

                                                                            2. 4

                                                                              perceived performance between KDE and Gnome have flipped

                                                                              Gnome Shell is huge and slow. A Canonical engineer (Ubuntu has switched from Unity to Gnome) has recently started to improve its performance with very good results but this also shows how terrible the performance was before: memory leaks, huge redraws all of the time and no clipping, … Now this needs to trickle down to users and the comments might change then.

                                                                              PS: KDE has not gotten a lot more bloat or slowness over the years and I don’t know if Gnome will be faster and lighter or if both will be similar.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                The lack of a Google Drive client is shameful, but I tried Insync and it’s the best money I’ve ever spent on a Linux app. Much better than the Mac version of Google Drive which was super buggy

                                                                              1. 10

                                                                                I’ll be damned. I had some passwords from 2008 there and I had completely forgot about it. Nice writeup and a good reminder that it’s very easy to leave breadcrumbs everywhere.

                                                                                P.S.: it’s extremely inconvenient to delete passwords on the GPM as there is no “delete all” option.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Thanks! It makes for a very nice morning read. Sorting items by popularity is also a good way to discover important issues which tend to float to the top of the aggregators

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    You’re welcome! I’m glad you like it. I’ll also be adding a flat mode where all the news are sorted by date rather than by site. This way you can scroll through all the news at once rather than site by site.

                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                    That was definitely much more enjoyable than I expected!

                                                                                    A bit of history on commonly used terms like “log”, “patch” and “lower case”

                                                                                    1. 16

                                                                                      Well, for one thing, I/O was extremely slow before SSDs.

                                                                                      I agree that latency for CPU-bound tasks has increased, but let’s not forget about saving a document and waiting for 10 seconds of blocking disk drive write access.

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        I don’t remember it being that slow unless your IDE controller on Linux didn’t support Ultra-DMA/66/100/133 and you were forced to use slow PIO.

                                                                                        1. 6

                                                                                          1983 ≠ Ultra-DMA. I’m talking about floppies – in response to the slightly angry title

                                                                                          But even in the HDD era (late 90s/early 00s) we spent a lot of time looking at spinning hourglasses while hearing disk scratching noises.

                                                                                          Sure, nostalgic and comforting, but slow nonetheless :)

                                                                                      1. 8

                                                                                        This might be a good place to ask:

                                                                                        • What is the BSD equivalent of the ArchWiki?
                                                                                        • What is the usability tradeoff between Docker and Jails?
                                                                                        • In what ways (if at all) can users contribute their own ports and make them available to other users?
                                                                                        • How is BSD for gaming these days?

                                                                                        These are genuine questions because I have pretty little clue about the BSD world. Would be cool if somebody with experience could share some insight. :)

                                                                                        1. 6

                                                                                          What is the BSD equivalent of the ArchWiki?

                                                                                          The handbook (which, incidentally, is very good).

                                                                                          In what ways (if at all) can users contribute their own ports and make them available to other users?

                                                                                          There’s not terribly good tooling for unofficial ports. They can be done, and have been done, but generally this will take the form of a whole alternate ports tree with a couple of changes.

                                                                                          How is BSD for gaming these days?

                                                                                          The main person working on this is myfreeweb (actually, I think he uses lobsters, so maybe he can say better than I can)–see here. The answer is ‘not great’, but also close to ‘quite good’. There is excellent driver support for nvidia and AMD GPUs. You can run most emulators natively. However, if you want to use wine, you will probably have to compile it yourself, because the versions in ports come in 32-bit-only and 64-bit-only varieties (no, they can’t co-exist), and you almost certainly want the version that can run both 32-bit and 64-bit apps. There is a linux emulator, but it can’t run steam (I did some work to try to get it running a while back, but it needs some work on the kernel side, which is too much commitment so I gave up on it), limiting its usefulness.

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            Thanks! Do you know if there’s an easier way to contribute to the handbook than to write suggestions to the mailing list? Do you know if small user-to-user tips (for instance for rather specific hardware fixes) are allowed on the handbook? If not, where would those end up?

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              @myfreeweb tags them with an email notification. If you’re replying to that person, leave off the @ so they don’t get hit with two emails for reply and @ mention notifications.

                                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                                I’m not really working on gaming all that much, the last really “gaming” thing I did was a RetroArch update (that still didn’t land in upstream ports…) For gaming, I usually just reboot into Windows.

                                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                                How is BSD for gaming these days?

                                                                                                I’d say the biggest effort is being undertaken by the openbsd_gaming community. A good starting point is the subreddit, then you can follow the most active members on Twitter or Mastodon to get more updates

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  In what ways (if at all) can users contribute their own ports and make them available to other users?

                                                                                                  1. You can submit a new port, e.g. https://bugs.freebsd.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=238584
                                                                                                  2. You can update an existing port, e.g. https://bugs.freebsd.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=241769
                                                                                                  3. You can set up a custom category that contains your additions to the ports tree (I have not tried this…), e.g. https://www.amoradi.org/2019/11/12/maintaining-port-modifications-in-freebsd.html
                                                                                                  4. You can set up a poudriere build system to build your own packages from the ports tree, e.g. with non-standard settings (it’s harder to pronounce than do…), e.g. https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-set-up-a-poudriere-build-system-to-create-packages-for-your-freebsd-servers then use portshaker to merge it with the standard tree within the poudriere hierarchy, e.g. https://github.com/hartzell/freebsd-ports.

                                                                                                  I’ve found building packages for the ports that I want, the way that I want and then installing/upgrading them with pkg is a much smoother experience than trying to install directly from ports and then upgrade using one of the ports management tools.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    Thanks for the answer. You seem quite knowledgeable. How do people share build scripts for software that may not be shipped in binary form but that you can build yourself locally if you have the data? I’m thinking about some NVIDIA projects (like OptiX) or some games. Basically, is there an AUR for FreeBSD anywhere? I checked your links and obviously ports can be shared amongst users but I’m just curious whether there’s an index for those user-contributed ports anywhere.

                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                      Sorry for the delay, missed your reply/question.

                                                                                                      I’m not familiar with AUR, but assume you mean the Archlinux User Repository.

                                                                                                      I don’t know of anything similar in the BSD world. At the least-automatically-shared end, people write software that works on the BSD’s and distribute it with instructions on what it needs. At the most-automatically-shared end, people contribute “ports” to the FreeBSD Ports tree. Automation oriented folks like me end up with their own collection of ports that explicitly rely on the FreeBSD Ports tree. I don’t know of anything that formalizes either the discovery of, or dependence on, other people’s personal ports. It hasn’t ever been an issue for me.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        Alright, makes sense. Thanks

                                                                                                  2. 1

                                                                                                    I ran into a thing just yesterday - jails (can) get an IP of their own, which seems to be automatically added to the host’s interface, but they do not (and afaik cannot) get their own MAC. This is FreeNAS for me (with iocage) and this is a little annoying because my fritzbox router seems to have a problem with port forwards now. But maybe I’m wrong and just haven’t solved in properly.

                                                                                                    In this case with docker at least would be possible to just use PORTS/EXPOSE and use the host’s main ip.

                                                                                                    Apart from that I’ve never encountered problems with jails and found them really smooth to work with.

                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                      You can give a jail a whole virtual network interface (epair/vnet) and then bridge it or whatever. You can also just use the host’s networking if you don’t need to isolate networking at all for that jail.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        thanks, that’s a good term to search for. I’m just a little surprised it (suddenly) doesn’t work anymore in my setup. My research so far has proven inconclusive with a lot of people saying that it can’t be done (in version X)

                                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                                    I have a torrent box connected via HDMI to my TV.

                                                                                                    I download stuff, then watch it on my tv.

                                                                                                    The same can be achieved by connecting my laptop, but this is more convenient.

                                                                                                    It has a raspbian + retropie + kodi

                                                                                                    1. 11

                                                                                                      A rss-to-email server. Essentially, a heavily modified rss2email with multi-user support.

                                                                                                      I subscribe to feeds by sending an URL to a robot via mail, the robots sends me back new articles via email.

                                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                                        That sounds awesome. Are there good software packages to use? Or is this something you fully hacked together?

                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                          I use https://github.com/wking/rss2email because it’s really easy to set up.

                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                            I started by hacking a multi-user version of rss2email, but it didn’t scale well.

                                                                                                            I ended up reusing the rss and xml parsers from rss2email on top of my own user manager and majordomo-like email interface.

                                                                                                            If you want to try it out ask me for an alpha key. I built this in 2016 and it’s been mostly untouched since then. I have about 20 friends in my server: https://feenbox.com/

                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                              If you’re a fan email interfaces and use notmuch, you might like sluk. It works well for single-user setups, and doesn’t require a full smtp server to run (it just dumps rss feeds into a notmuch inbox).

                                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                                            This is already happening with one specifically requiring mails to be sent from another Big Mailer Corp to hit the inbox, or requiring that senders be added to the contacts for others. Any other sender will hit spambox unconditionnally for a while before being eventually upgraded to inbox.

                                                                                                            Anybody knows which bigcorp player he’s talking about?

                                                                                                            1. 14

                                                                                                              My mailserver, for many months, could not send mails to outlook addresses. The outlook server replied “OK” but the mail was transparently discarded. Not inbox, not spam, not trash, nothing. As if the mail had never been sent.

                                                                                                              I believe nowadays outlook “only” send my mails to spam.

                                                                                                              1. 9

                                                                                                                I have had the same experience. With Gmail it was even more difficult to evade their hyper-aggressive spam filters.

                                                                                                                I can’t call any of this “easy” and I had to struggle and learn a lot of new concepts (like DKIM, which is a pain to set up). It’s also very tricky to verify, if it fails it can fail silently; your mail is just dropped or goes to spam. I had that happen when my DNSsec signatures weren’t renewed, for example, and also when I had made a small mistake that made my DKIM invalid or not used (I don’t remember which).

                                                                                                                You need to be an expert at mail before this stuff is “easy”. When you get redirected to the spamfolder, those hosts aren’t giving any information about why this happened, so you’re left guessing. Also, you sometimes don’t even know unless you’re in contact with the recipient in some other way than just e-mail (and sometimes people don’t bother to notify you that the mail got flagged as spam). There are tools out there that can help verify your technical setup like rDNS, SPF, DKIM etc. But it’s still annoying as fuck to get it set up. Once you’ve done the work, it basically runs itself though.

                                                                                                                So I appreciate the article’s attempt to get more people to try hosting their own mail, I would say it’s quite one-sided and assumes a whole lot of technical sysadmin competency that the author has probably simply become blind to himself.

                                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                                  I had a similar problem and my solution was to route all mail to them via a separate, dedicated IP which didn’t suffer the same problem. A solution possible thanks to the flexibility of Exim. As much as these simpler MTAs seem attractive I wonder how they would cope with such scenarios.

                                                                                                                2. 4

                                                                                                                  I had this problem sending from my own mail server to Gmail addresses. After a couple of months I just gave up on my own mail server and went to mailbox.org

                                                                                                                1. 7

                                                                                                                  Nice article and I agree with the sentiment.

                                                                                                                  The only caveat is that modern web browsing is definitely much more taxing than “typing out latex documents.” You are running almost an entire graphical OS in each tab. And, if I’m not mistaken, most frequency managers actually slow down CPUs to a crawl when they’re idle. Other than that, I’m all in on this.

                                                                                                                  In my own experience, disabling Turbo Boost is barely noticeable and extends battery life for about an hour, which translates to around 20% extra life. I actually have a script called lpm.sh, for “low power mode” that essentially stops syncthing, an important source of CPU wakeups, and disables turbo boost to grant me those extra minutes. CPU frequency is properly managed in my case and I don’t have the need to run cpupower manually.

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                                                                                                                    I guess this is the One Thread where me-tooing is acceptable, so have my appreciation too!

                                                                                                                    Thanks to everybody involved in keeping this site running and free of trolls